Purchase Linux CDs / DVDs / Flash Drives at OSDisc.com

Welcome to Our Community

While Linux.org has been around for a while, we recently changed management and had to purge most of the content (including users). If you signed up before April 23rd please sign up again. Thanks!

  1. Get $5 off your first Lyft ride while helping us pay for hosting Linux.org! --> $5 Lyft
    Dismiss Notice

Introduction to Linux

Discussion in 'Linux Beginner Tutorials' started by Rob, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. Rebecca

    Rebecca New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
  2. atanere

    atanere Moderator
    Gold Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2017
    Messages:
    478
    Likes Received:
    386
    Hi Rebecca, and welcome!

    All of those are good distros, but not all are good for beginners. So if you are new to Linux, I would recommend several on that page (all in the 1st column)-- Ubuntu, Mint, or Zorin. It is good to try out several to see what appeals to you and what seems most comfortable to use.

    Remember that Linux is not a program... it is a complete operating system, and if you are not careful it may erase your current computer operating system (Windows or Mac). So if you have questions first please be sure to ask more about this. Good luck!
     
  3. Eli Taylor

    Eli Taylor New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    So how do i get started
     
  4. atanere

    atanere Moderator
    Gold Supporter

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2017
    Messages:
    478
    Likes Received:
    386
    Hi Eli, and welcome to the site!

    Pick one (or more) Linux distributions to download from here on our site or from DistroWatch. As I mentioned above, some good distros for beginners are Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and Zorin (and Linux Lite is good too)... but there are many other choices available. The file you download will be a .iso file, and you need to use a special method (burn image) to burn the file to a DVD, or you can use some special software to burn the .iso file to a USB flash drive. There are many free programs to burn the Linux .iso to USB, and I'm sure you can find some of them with Google.

    Once you get the Linux burned to DVD or USB, you can boot directly on those and use Linux in a "live" session so that you don't do any harm to your Windows or Mac computer. Or you can install another free program called VirtualBox that will let your install Linux in a special environment called a "virtual machine." This also will not harm your regular Windows or Mac operating system.

    Those are the most common ways to get started. If you have a spare computer that you can erase, you can also do a full Linux installation. The best way to do that is to let Linux have the whole computer and erase Windows, if it's there. There are ways to run install Linux and keep Windows, but that is more complicated for beginners, and you are really at risk of messing up Windows... so you may not want to go that way unless you are comfortable re-installing Windows if things go wrong.

    If you have more trouble or need more advice, please start a new thread in one of the forums and ask questions as specifically as you can so we can focus better on your problem. Good luck!
     
    Esteban Sandoval likes this.
  5. Ptahhotep

    Ptahhotep New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2017
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    11
    Thank you for these, as starter, it's a bit like going to school for the first time, you know where you want to go, but you just don't know how to get there. This takes much of that pain away. Again thanks and I will make my way through them all
     
    Rob likes this.

Share This Page