Introduction to Linux

Rob

Administrator
Staff member
Welcome to Linux.org's "Getting Started with Linux: Beginner Level Course". If you're new to Linux and want to find out how to use the fastest growing operating system today, all you have to do is follow these lessons and you'll be using Linux efficiently in no time.

Getting Started with Linux: Beginner Level Course is designed as a self-study course. One of the things that makes this course unique is that at any point during a course, you can add a note, or comment. This is done in the comments bar on the right hand side of the screen. These comments can be made public or private, and can take any form that you like. Feel free to use them to ask questions, answer other users questions, post code updates, or suggest different methodologies for solving problems.

Linux is a very popular operating system, and this course is followed by thousands of people each day. Due to this, there are a lot of people online who are also in the process of learning it. So please feel free to ask any questions that you have and someone in the Linux Community will probably answer you! Also, this whole site, including the courses are regularly moderated. If you don't get an answer to a question, we will do our best to answer it for you. In addition, please send us your suggestions for how we can improve the courses, any typos that you have noticed, or any errors that you have encountered.

If you're ready to start learning about Linux, you may start at our table of contents or you may want to jump right into lesson one What Is Linux?.
 

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Rob

Administrator
Staff member
Getting Started with Linux: Beginner Level Course is designed as a self-study course. This one?
At one point, the tutorials were meant to be more of a course instead of a bunch of tutorials.. you can just read through all of them in beginner, then intermediate, then advanced. They don't cover everything, but should get you a good understanding of most things.

The link @arochester put is another good read.
 

Sweet William

New Member
Welcome to Linux.org's "Getting Started with Linux: Beginner Level Course". If you're new to Linux and want to find out how to use the fastest growing operating system today, all you have to do is follow these lessons and you'll be using Linux efficiently in no time.
I am hoping to find a quick and easy way to speed up my Sony VA10, using Linux-mint 17.3. As a comparative
newbie to Linux-Mint, 17.3, I'm having problems with the only instruction that I have found; it began "in dash open...."
Since I had no idea where to find Dash, its meaning was lost to me.
 

Sweet William

New Member
I am hoping to find a quick and easy way to speed up my Sony VA10, using Linux-mint 17.3. As a comparative
newbie to Linux-Mint, 17.3, I'm having problems with the only instruction that I have found; it began "in dash open...."
Since I had no idea where to find Dash, its meaning was lost to me.
I 'm sorry. I thought that I had lost my connection, so I left the conversation seeking advice somewhere else.
 

Shivam

New Member
Welcome to Linux.org's "Getting Started with Linux: Beginner Level Course". If you're new to Linux and want to find out how to use the fastest growing operating system today, all you have to do is follow these lessons and you'll be using Linux efficiently in no time.

Getting Started with Linux: Beginner Level Course is designed as a self-study course. One of the things that makes this course unique is that at any point during a course, you can add a note, or comment. This is done in the comments bar on the right hand side of the screen. These comments can be made public or private, and can take any form that you like. Feel free to use them to ask questions, answer other users questions, post code updates, or suggest different methodologies for solving problems.

Linux is a very popular operating system, and this course is followed by thousands of people each day. Due to this, there are a lot of people online who are also in the process of learning it. So please feel free to ask any questions that you have and someone in the Linux Community will probably answer you! Also, this whole site, including the courses are regularly moderated. If you don't get an answer to a question, we will do our best to answer it for you. In addition, please send us your suggestions for how we can improve the courses, any typos that you have noticed, or any errors that you have encountered.

If you're ready to start learning about Linux, you may start at our table of contents or you may want to jump right into lesson one What Is Linux?.
 

arochester

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
@Shivam

Ok. You have quoted Rob's post from the top of this thread. Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
 
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Dror Kobi

New Member
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Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) Complete Video Course | Pearson IT Certification - http://bit.ly/LFCS-Linux

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Linux Admin Online Training | Linux Admin Certification Course | Edureka - http://bit.ly/EdurekaLinuxAdmin

Complete Linux course: Become a Linux professional | Udemy - http://bit.ly/UdemyCompleteLinux

Red Hat Certified System Administrator (RHCSA) and Red Hat Certified Engineer (RHCE) Certification with Virtual Machines, 2nd Edition | Pearson IT Certification - http://bit.ly/RedHat-Linux
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
I have just join Linux and what to learn Linux. try to follow this link.
https://www.linux.org/forums/linux-beginner-tutorials.123/
but no help.
are there video or text on learning Linux,
Welcome Ashraf! There is LOTS of help at the link you gave, so I'm confused by what you mean. Those are text articles, not video, but they give a lot of information about the basic knowledge of Linux tasks and usage, especially from the command line. Of course, you will probably begin in a graphical environment, but it is still very useful to know the underlying basics.

Almost all "introduction to Linux" learning sites will introduce you to the command line. Maybe you are confused because you are not running a Linux distro yet and you can't follow the command examples? The best way to learn Linux is to download it and burn it to a DVD or USB, then boot it up and use it. You can also install Linux into a "virtual machine" using VirtualBox (free) in Windows. Or if you have a spare computer, go all out and install Linux directly on it.

There are MANY different versions of Linux, but many are very easy for new users... some examples are Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and Linux Lite. Try some out, and if you don't like them, try some others! You can search on Google or YouTube to find lots of Linux training videos, but everything kind of starts "in the middle" somewhere, so you need to use it a bit to start to get an understanding. If you really want to start "at the beginning".... you're back to using the command line! :D

If you have more specific questions, please open up a new thread in one of the forums, like General Linux or Getting Started. Folks here are glad to help. Good luck!
 

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