Google's new maneuver against the free internet

Terminal Velocity

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There is this synopsis from the Github:

And then there is this article ranting about it:

I don't understand all the arguments but what I make out of it is that Google will impose restrictions to operating systems and browsers, there will be approved machines and not approved machines, In short (if this goes in full effect in the future) if you want to use the internet, Google must like you first, your OS, your browser, your extensions and you as a person.

What do you think of it?
 


There is this synopsis from the Github:

And then there is this article ranting about it:

I don't understand all the arguments but what I make out of it is that Google will impose restrictions to operating systems and browsers, there will be approved machines and not approved machines, In short (if this goes in full effect in the future) if you want to use the internet, Google must like you first, your OS, your browser, your extensions and you as a person.

What do you think of it?
I mostly use Firefox with DuckDuckGo. Google can sit and spin.
 
Google only got the power to do this because most people use Chromium based browsers causing Google to own most of the web-browser market.
Hopefully the EU and other governments will prevent Google from going through with it.
 
Good article's Terminal Velocity, enjoyed the education:-:)
We should be able to use whatever browser and os we want.

If, like the article says, that engineers and executives at Google are attempting to dismantle what makes the web the web {it wouldn't surprise me} then, this is an action IMO, that should have serious consequences.
 
The thing that worries me is that Google moves at a faster pace than the Legal System does, by the time the courts get around to dismantling this operation, it might have already been in operation for some time, maybe even years, causing untold amounts of damage to the free web.

When I first learned about this, a call to action was made to call one's representatives with these concerns, but seeing as I do not live in the United States, my reach is very limited.
 
The thing that worries me is that Google moves at a faster pace than the Legal System does, by the time the courts get around to dismantling this operation, it might have already been in operation for some time, maybe even years, causing untold amounts of damage to the free web.

When I first learned about this, a call to action was made to call one's representatives with these concerns, but seeing as I do not live in the United States, my reach is very limited.
I'm guessing here:-
Would this be a matter for the Federal Communication Commission?

One can file a complaint online here in the United States.
 
The thing that worries me is that Google moves at a faster pace than the Legal System does,
And even if fines were to be given by governments it wouldn't do much because they have been pocket change so far each time for companies like Google, Facebook, Apple and Microsoft, etc.
 
That's a good one...
The EU has done more for privacy lately than most other governments, even though they have made some bad decisions but I'll leave it at that to prevent breaking the forum rules.
 
I mostly use Firefox with DuckDuckGo. Google can sit and spin. Google's recent move raises concerns about the future of a free internet. The push towards restricting certain content access has sparked debates on digital freedom. In the midst of these changes, consider leveraging the power of social media, buy facebook likes likes for the average user isn't just about popularity; it's a strategic move. Boosting engagement on your posts can counterbalance the challenges posed by evolving internet dynamics. It's a simple yet effective way for users to amplify their online presence, ensuring that their content remains visible and influential amid a shifting digital landscape.
It's important to stay up-to-date and involved in conversations surrounding internet regulations, net neutrality, and the influence of big tech companies on our online experiences. It's worth keeping in mind that Google doesn't hold all the power when it comes to shaping the internet. Ongoing debates highlight the need for a more open and competitive online environment, where users have a variety of options and monopolistic practices are avoided.
 
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While it's essential to stay informed and engaged in discussions about these matters, it's also worth noting that Google alone doesn't have the power to dictate the entire landscape of the internet.

However, there are ongoing discussions and debates about internet regulations, net neutrality, and the role of big tech companies in shaping online experiences. Many argue for maintaining a more open and competitive internet to avoid monopolistic practices and ensure that users have choices.
Was that a ChatGPT reply?
 
I guess everybody missed this disclaimer right at the very start of that GitHub page:
IMG_6938.jpeg


So, it looks like this is a storm in a teacup!
 
EDIT: This turned out much longer than I expected.

Along these same lines, I've been leary of Cloudflare. A large percentage of the internet uses them because they provide a free CDN that's easily configured and has some extra features.

About 20% of the web, that we know of, uses Clouflare:

Cite: https://w3techs.com/technologies/details/cn-cloudflare

You've seen them interrupt you before. You've even seen them here when we've had some network issues. They were the screen that 'checked your computer' to ensure you should be visiting the site.

You've also seen them throw up a CAPTCHA. They have their own CAPTCHA and don't use the service provided by Google. (Where does all that problem solving energy go? I'm sure they're using that data for something. I suspect they're using it for ML models in the image-recognition department, but I digress.)

So, what happens if Cloudflare decides they just don't like you? What if they don't like your ISP? What if your ISP happens to have some abusive people on it and they decide they don't like the whole block?

These days, some ISPs are using NATed public IP addresses. They function just like your NAT in your home router, but it means multiple people are using the same public IP address. (They should just use IPv6 and using NAT in this instance is pure garbage and a horrible idea.) You might also be sharing an IP address because you're using a VPN.

(Not to mention they seem to already distrust VPN traffic, from what I've witnessed.)

While they've never done so as far as I know, they could pretty much blacklist you. They could cut you off from a very large chunk of the internet - and you have no recourse. There's no appeal. I doubt there are even laws that'd stop them from doing so. Even if there were laws, they'd likely have conditions for 'the safety and security of the infrastructure' which is certainly subjective.

They could really screw with someone.

Code:
Name Server: lia.ns.cloudflare.com
Name Server: mark.ns.cloudflare.com

That's this site. That's Linux.org. We're behind Cloudflare's servers. With the uniqueness of our browser footprint (see Panopticlick 3.0), we'd have to switch browsers without leaving any clues that it was still us. So, we'd have to change our browser and IP address - and hope they don't notice us. When they do, they could block us again.

Anyhow, that's enough of a rant I suppose.

If you do want to test your browser's fingerprint, here's the direct URL:


You're pretty unique. You're easily fingerprinted and singled out, should a company wish to do so. (And they do.)
 
Cover your tracks. There will be browsers etc out there thta are much more difficult to track than mine.....Supposedly the various tracking companies will go for the lesser protected ones.

2023-11-05_10-11.png

I must say that even if they do garner some info from me.....how damn boring that would be !
 
Cover your tracks.

Yup. If you want some semblance of anonymity, you really have to work at it. Like security, it's not necessarily the default. It's something you have to learn and incorporate.
 
I think it can be done fairly simply. If you dont want half the world to know certain information, don't contribute that info to the internet. If you have a pathological need to publish info.... Dont.
 

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