Today's article is about mounted partitions...

KGIII

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Have you ever wanted to list all the mounted partitions on your system? Well, you can - and there are more of them than many folks will think. Sure, you'll know how many you have if you've ever used these commands before - but others will probably expect to just see the partitions they created during installation.


I suppose the commands can be useful if you need to ensure a partition is mounted.
 


Screenshot from 2023-07-25 17-01-15.png


Here is a simple list of the drives I have installed, whether they are mounted or not (the entirety of two drives lol). Mounting it is a simple matter of right clicking on it.

I get what you're trying to do. The terminal method is universal across all distros. However many desktop environments have advanced to the point of having almost windows-esque level of ease of use without any proprietary restrictions placed upon it. Its not always a good thing since it won't stop users from doing anything "stoopid", but I digress...

Like in one of your previous articles, I am once again a click away. PoP!_os is awesome.
 
However many desktop environments have advanced to the point of having almost windows-esque level of ease of use without any proprietary restrictions placed upon it. Its not always a good thing since it won't stop users from doing anything "stoopid", but I digress...

Yup. Pretty much every article I write, probably about 90%, involves opening up a terminal. Readers should be aware of that by now. LOL

Also, those aren't your only mounted partitions. You have all sorts of other partitions that are mounted.

Unless you're troubleshooting, you probably won't need to know about those other mounted partitions, but they exist and their number is much larger than the number you're seeing in your GUI.

By all means, use GUI tools for GUI things. Just don't expect me to write about 'em all that often. ;)
 
.....& don't forget the 'mount' command itself too - it too will show you lots of info. ;)

Code:
~$ mount
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
udev on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,nosuid,relatime,size=3986356k,nr_inodes=996589,mode=755)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,nosuid,noexec,relatime,gid=5,mode=600,ptmxmode=000)
tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=803040k,mode=755)
/dev/sda2 on / type ext4 (rw,noatime)
tmpfs on /run/lock type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=5120k)
securityfs on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw,relatime)
pstore on /sys/fs/pstore type pstore (rw,relatime)
tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,size=1606060k)
/dev/sda3 on /home type ext4 (rw,noatime)
/dev/sda1 on /boot/efi type vfat (rw,relatime,fmask=0077,dmask=0077,codepage=437,iocharset=ascii,shortname=mixed,utf8,errors=remount-ro)
rpc_pipefs on /run/rpc_pipefs type rpc_pipefs (rw,relatime)
cgroup2 on /sys/fs/cgroup type cgroup2 (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,nsdelegate)
efivarfs on /sys/firmware/efi/efivars type efivarfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
tmpfs on /run/user/1000 type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,size=803036k,nr_inodes=200759,mode=700,uid=1000,gid=1000)
 
Yup. This is Linux and there are almost always multiple ways to do something.

That's why I don't expect to run out of articles to write.
 
By all means, use GUI tools for GUI things. Just don't expect me to write about 'em all that often. ;)
No specific GUI tools here, just the default locations folder, packaged in the cosmic variant of gnome shell.
 
No specific GUI tools here, just the default locations folder, packaged in the cosmic variant of gnome shell.

Well, yeah... LOL That'd be a GUI. (It also doesn't show you all the weird partitions you have mounted. And you do have weird partitions mounted.)

I don't have anything against GUIs. It's nothing of the sort. I just prefer to do a bunch of stuff in the terminal because I find it easier and faster. It's also closer to 'universal'.

There's also the part of wanting people to learn "Linux" more than just learn how to use an operating system. I want them to understand what's going on behind the scenes. Make sense?

I spent much of my earlier Linux years learning to use distros and not really learning to use Linux. I was on the "right" path (right for me) at first and all sorts of gung ho. I even did Linux From Scratch and things like that. But, then I got lazy and really just learned to use distros without really using the Linux that lies beneath.

I'm pretty sure that a normal user can use Linux without ever needing to use a terminal - until something goes so wrong that GUI tools no longer work. I'm pretty sure that your regular Linux user doesn't have to become familiar with the terminal.

And that's great. It really is. it has made Linux accessable to those who would find the terminal daunting.

But, that's not who I write for - most of the time. I write for the curious. I write for those needing to accomplish a task. I write for those who need to troubleshoot. I write for those who want to learn more about Linux, bringing them up to speed/making Linux approachable.

I should have stuck with that tagline from the first site. "Making Linux Approachable" is just a great tagline!

Anyhow, don't forget that I happily accept on-topic guest articles. If you want more articles that use a GUI, I'm more than happy to help you have a platform for that. ;)

Also, for the record, you probably don't actually need to know all the weird partitions you have mounted. As a general rule, there's nothing in there that you'll want to go mucking about with. Unless you have a very specific problem, it's not really infomation you'll need to know.
 
Anyhow, don't forget that I happily accept on-topic guest articles. If you want more articles that use a GUI, I'm more than happy to help you have a platform for that. ;)
Sounds like an invitation. Right now I am content seconding your post, showing this particular community that there is a way that doesn't require the "big scary terminal" those beginners are so terrified of... so maybe at some point in the future. Though I think wizard would be much more qualified for that, since he has about 99999999999 distros installed on his computer.
 
Sounds like an invitation.

Absolutely. It sounds like I get a day off, but I always end up formatting and the like.

there is a way that doesn't require the "big scary terminal" those beginners are so terrified of..

Again, absolutely. Unless something breaks and requires using the terminal to fix it, a user may never see the terminal at all. I still find the terminal useful, faster, more consistent, and easier. The odds are good that I realize those benefits because I do quite a bit in the terminal. As a general rule, I have three different terminals open at all times. I do different things in each of them.
 

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