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Solved Problem with the Lubuntu Boot

Solved issue

Zorg44

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Hello,
I mounted on an old computer inspiron 1501 Lubuntu and recently it did not start and remained blocked. I reformatted and reinstalled the version "lubuntu-22.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso" but the pc does not boot normally anymore.
At startup I am required to alt F2 to display this menu and choose the line advanced option
IMG_4761.jpeg


Them I arrive on this screen :

IMG_4771.jpeg



If I choose the line "Ubuntu, with linux 6.2.0-34-generic" to start the computer normally.
If I let the computer boot normally it remains blocked
Is there a solution to the problem?
You should know that beforehand I set the boot with the nomodeset option and I am obliged to clean bcmwl-kernel-source and install firmware-b43-installer.
I tried with several different versions
linux-lite-6.6-64bit.iso
lubuntu-22.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso
lubuntu-23.04-desktop-amd64.iso
lubuntu-23.10-desktop-amd64.iso
ubuntu-mate-22.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso
linuxmint-21.1-xfce-64bit.iso
linuxmint-21.2-xfce-64bit.iso
I still have the same problem of blocking at boot
 


Hi,

my suggestion:

  • Boot your os
  • login as root
  • open and compare the options in
/boot/grub/grub.cfg

so you can see that you have to do and what the difference.

EDIT: Have you tried to start default version hit [ENTER] ? I have this problem on an old centos there the boot timeout doesnt work anymore.
 
It is likely that with the newer kernel some support for older components may have been lost, either use recovery mode to try and find/fix any issues, or just use the old kernel.
 
if you have looked in the bios......does this pc support 'Secure Boot'...?

If so, disable it
 
I reformatted and reinstalled the version "lubuntu-22.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso" but the pc does not boot normally anymore.
I'm a little confused by this.

If it's an old machine, why not use the older kernel stack. Ubuntu LTS releases have two primary choices; GA being the most older and more stable stack, and HWE which changes during the first ~two years upgrades to newer stacks, and is best for those using newer hardware.

Lubuntu 22.04 LTS & 22.04.1 media installed with the 5.15 kernel stack, and keeps it for the life of the product (ie. GA kernel stack).

You mention Lubuntu 22.04.2 which uses HWE and installs with the 5.19 kernel as per a picture you provided, but updates over time and currently uses the 6.2 kernel (it'll use 6.5 next). Ubuntu-MATE being another Ubuntu flavor is identical in this regard to Lubuntu.

You mention re-installing the system & it doesn't boot anymore, but here I'm unsure what you're actually describing. If the system was working & after re-install it no longer works; to me that screams a hardware issue & not software.

If the failure was due to updates, you didn't specify what it was running before hand? If it's an old machine, I've had far better success with the older kernel stack as already stated. If it's kernel stack related; as Ubuntu creates new ISOs when the kernel stack changes; there are currently 3 stacks you can try using only the "Try Ubuntu" without install for 22.04 alone. eing 22.04(.1) for 5.15, 22.04.2 (5.19) & 22.04.3 (6.2)
 
thank you for your answers
@guiverc it will be at least 4 months that lubuntu is installed on this computer. there were updates and everything worked well. A week or two ago there were updates and after having switched off the computer it did not boot afterwards
the version I installed is this one: lubuntu-22.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso the file I have was uploaded in July
I will try to boot in root
 
thank you for your answers
@guiverc it will be at least 4 months that lubuntu is installed on this computer. there were updates and everything worked well. A week or two ago there were updates and after having switched off the computer it did not boot afterwards
the version I installed is this one: lubuntu-22.04.2-desktop-amd64.iso the file I have was uploaded in July
I will try to boot in root
Lubuntu 22.04 LTS installed with the HWE kernel stack, and .2 came with the 5.19 kernel from Ubuntu 22.10. That was upgraded to 6.2, which is why your screenshot of grub showed both 5.19 & 6.2 enabled.

(ps: I'll likely refer to your Lubuntu system as a Ubuntu one, as that's how I see it. Lubuntu ISOs are built using a seed that is stored on Ubuntu infrastructure, built by Ubuntu tools & downloaded from https://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ just like all Ubuntu plus Ubuntu flavors - thus why I may use Ubuntu in this response).

I would probably tell your system to boot to runlevel 1 and check out everything is fine from there. I'll provide a link to the Ubuntu recovery mode (https://wiki.ubuntu.com/RecoveryMode) if you want to try that, but as I use more than just Ubuntu, I tend to just hit the E in grub to edit the entry that will boot the system, then go to the kernel line (ie. starts with linux) and add a " 1 " so it'll stop at runlevel 1. I tend to also remove "quiet splash" from the line, so more diagnostics messages can be seen on screen.

Runlevel 1 will boot using text only (ie. no GUI) which will let you explore logs & system details. I'd explore logs look for any clues (any crashes shown in dmesg or particularly journalctl as dmesg only shows the current session details where the systemd journal as shown by journalctl can provide clues from prior boots.

I can't say what you should look for, I usually only look for anything that looks unusual to me, which likely won't be very helpful if you've not looked at what you system looks like when it's working. I'll look for clues such as drive errors, temperature warnings etc. If I see nothing wrong, I'd likely just let the box sit there an hour or so, and see if it does nothing (if the hardware is good, it shouldn't do anything), as if I didn't find clues my next step is usually exploring the hardware for faults (as I'll know if I made software changes, what packages were upgraded during the prior session - as I always read them; and if it was anything kernel related - your selection of an older kernel should boot your system normally).

If you're not familiar with what packages were updated/installed last session, for deb packages you can peruse /var/log/apt/history.log, which is something if I consider the hardware has tested as good, but I can't work out why it no longer boots (and there wasn't a reason such as power-outage or something that may trigger issues; fixed via fsck etc).

If the 5.19 kernel does boot normally; I'd likely use it and install the GA kernel as per the documentation here - https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Kernel/LTSEnablementStack (follow the bit after "To downgrade from HWE/OEM to GA kernel:" and note the GA/HWE & any OEM stacks can co-exist; which is why the instructions tell you to test everything is good before you do the removal stage. Myself I never do the removal & have GA + HWE installed; though some close-source kernel modules (nvidia etc) can prevent multiple stacks from co-existing; but Lubuntu doesn't include any of those by default.

This isn't an answer sorry; just my thoughts.
 
I start in linux so I do not know the commands there what I did I delete quiet splash and at startup it stops there
IMG_4773.jpeg
 
I fixed the problem by installing lubuntu 20.4 with kernel 5.15 and then everything works fine. I disabled updates.
 
turn updates back on. You leave yourself vulnerable by having them off.

Set up Timeshift. If you are (highly unlikely) unlucky enough to get an update that screws things......simply restore to a previous date.

Keep the Timeshift on an external drive. You usually only need to keep approx 4, maximum
you can restrict the number kept in settings/schedule
 


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