Help, please anyone.

davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
By default Ubuntu has Startup Disk Creator (usb-creator-gtk) through the Synaptic Package Manager works with Ubuntu based OS's like Linux Mint, Zorin, and anything else based on Buntu - if your OS is based on something else I use Etcher https://www.balena.io/etcher/

I see you are missing several public keys bust most are for Groovy which is expiring soon here is how to fix them
How to fix missing public key

Code:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys COPIED-NUMBER-HERE
example the Google Earth Key is 78BD65473CB3BD13

Code:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys 78BD65473CB3BD13
Hi I'm at my screen now. With me updating each key would I be able to continue running groovy?
 


davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
Quick update. I'm currentley running linuxmint but I don't have any pen testing apps installed and can't figure it out. I wanted to play around with them on my own connections and devices
 

Lord Boltar

Well-Known Member
Credits
5,530
Hi I'm at my screen now. With me updating each key would I be able to continue running groovy?
Canonical will not be sending updates to 20.10 is not a LTS Version but is interim versions that last about 9 months or so from when it is released - then die, no more updates, basically beta versions - 20.10 reaches EOL end of July. 21.04 and 21.10 are also interim - The third party keys may work for a while longer but will eventually go away as well - That is why I do not use them, I only use LTS versions current is 20.04 with full support until 2025.
 

brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Credits
4,952
many graphic artist and game designers use Linux and a pen.. BUT if you need help we will need to know which make and model.. some are apparently easy to set up other more difficult. [example the iBall pen [WP8060] will work but i there is a lot of work needed installing the right dependencies ]
 

brickwizard

Well-Known Member
Credits
4,952

davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
For penetration testing like the pre installed apps on Kali Linux. I played about with bits and bobs learning from videos on YouTube and now I've installed mint they aren't installed by default. People recommend mint but it seem pretty much like windows to some degree. It's all neat and tidy with limited modifications. Or that's what I get from the first hour of playing around. I'm new, I'd say I've spent a fair bit of time but Im not going to lie I really don't have much knowledge like many of you do and this is why I'm here to get help and learn along the way. 36 hours ago I couldn't install a new OS and now I have I'm looking for an easy interface with all Kali apps either installed by default or are possible to install. I've got Kali Linux downloading again so any other ideas would be fantastic. Thanks so much guy and gals
 

Lord Boltar

Well-Known Member
Credits
5,530
For penetration testing like the pre installed apps on Kali Linux. I played about with bits and bobs
Here are a few - but I would do some research first on this
Wireshark
Code:
sudo apt install wireshark
Aircrack-NG
Code:
sudo apt install aircrack-ng
NMap
Code:
sudo apt install nmap
THC Hydra
Code:
sudo apt install hydra-gtk
HTTrack
Code:
sudo apt install httrack
SQLMap
Code:
sudo apt install sqlmap
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
24,128
I would spend your time learning how Linux works before attempting to touch any pen-testing tools, when you understand how Linux works you will have an easier time how to use pen-testing tools but then you would only mostly need to learn what they do and in what situation they are used etc.
 

davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
I would spend your time learning how Linux works before attempting to touch any pen-testing tools, when you understand how Linux works you will have an easier time how to use pen-testing tools but then you would only mostly need to learn what they do and in what situation they are used etc.
So you would suggest just play around on mint first and learn the full language before progressing on to the Kali penetration testing side of things.

What would you recommend I start with as in a task of some sort to learn things from. See I jumped in the deep end with one thing in mind and that was for this to become a hobby and learn as much as I can. Time is my friend because the more I'm learning the less I want to drink or do other money consuming activities

I love learning things but I'm unsure of what I want to achieve. I mean sure I want to learn how to code systems and play around with things most people don't understand. But I'm open to learn everything but my only task that comes to mind is the Kali apps. I wanted to learn how people are hacked and the main reason for someone to want to hack people for any other reason but own personal gain.

But I'm here starting from the bottom, what should I do first on mint to begin learning from the start
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
24,128
So you would suggest just play around on mint first and learn the full language before progressing on to the Kali penetration testing side of things.
Yes, learn how Linux works first, up to the point where you know what you are doing and are able to configure your system how you want. As well as when you run into a problem you are able to solve it yourself 90% of time either by your own knowledge or being able to know what to search for in a search engine and to use what you find help solve your problem. I've seen too many people who only jump to Linux because they want to be a hacker and don't really care about learning Linux, as I've said many times before learn to walk before you can run.
 

davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
Yes, learn how Linux works first, up to the point where you know what you are doing and are able to configure your system how you want. As well as when you run into a problem you are able to solve it yourself 90% of time either by your own knowledge or being able to know what to search for in a search engine and to use what you find help solve your problem. I've seen too many people who only jump to Linux because they want to be a hacker and don't really care about learning Linux, as I've said many times before learn to walk before you can run.
This is 100% correct. I can customise certain things like how things look and what goes in what place but the terminal I'm very limited on. I get the git and most updates but like how this all started once I hit an error I'm pretty much done for. I've looked on Amazon for the Linux learning book. Would you suggest it? Will it teach me the terminal commands and will I learn the basic knowledge
 

f33dm3bits

Gold Member
Gold Supporter
Credits
24,128
Just to point our two major differences, there is Linux desktop use and Linux server use. A lot of desktop specific stuff you will have not have much use for when being a sysadmin, but basic stuff you use as a sysadmin you will also use on the desktop.

I can only tell you how I learned and that is by experience and trying out things. I dual-booted for a few months when I started, a short time after I took the leap of faith and wiped my Windows partition. I then tried to do the things I was used to doing on Windows, when I ran into something I would search the web. For example I did read a book to go through some basic commands and learning how to work with package managers or some website, can't remember which. I didn't know how to install video drivers so I would search how do I install Nvidia drivers under Linux, back then it wasn't as easy as it is now. Basically in short 90% is hands on experience and 10% reading searching the web and reading about how others did it. Set yourself a project, learning to use Linux as my desktop and try to solve the problem you run into.

Lastly it also depends on how much free time you have on your hands, at the time I started with Linux it was my hobby and I spend all my free time on it. How much you put in is how much you get out of something. I hope that helps, and lastly I have zero interest in Kali and pen-testing tools because Linux is fun enough for me since the learning never stops because of technology development is never sleeping and I have no interest in being tempted to do something illegal ;) :cool:
 

davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
Just to point our two major differences, there is Linux desktop use and Linux server use. A lot of desktop specific stuff you will have not have much use for when being a sysadmin, but basic stuff you use as a sysadmin you will also use on the desktop.

I can only tell you how I learned and that is by experience and trying out things. I dual-booted for a few months when I started, a short time after I took the leap of faith and wiped my Windows partition. I then tried to do the things I was used to doing on Windows, when I ran into something I would search the web. For example I did read a book to go through some basic commands and learning how to work with package managers or some website, can't remember which. I didn't know how to install video drivers so I would search how do I install Nvidia drivers under Linux, back then it wasn't as easy as it is now. Basically in short 90% is hands on experience and 10% reading searching the web and reading about how others did it. Set yourself a project, learning to use Linux as my desktop and try to solve the problem you run into.

Lastly it also depends on how much free time you have on your hands, at the time I started with Linux it was my hobby and I spend all my free time on it. How much you put in is how much you get out of something. I hope that helps, and lastly I have zero interest in Kali and pen-testing tools because Linux is fun enough for me since the learning never stops because of technology development is never sleeping and I have no interest in being tempted to do something illegal ;) :cool:
This is great for me to hear and I'm not intending on stopping with me also wanting to put as many hours in as possible and learn as much as I can in return. I think I will get the book just for something to read when my eyes have had enough of the screen
 

davidg33

New Member
Credits
120
Thanks for the help everyone. I was nearly giving up 3 days ago and now I've sorted Linux mint out and figured out how to make a live Kali usb from the Linux mint. I didn't think it was possible but now I can learn on mint and play about with Kali without messing up the main system by doing something wrong that I've no idea how to fix.

I will always be here now to learn everything that everyone has to teach
 

KGIII

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
25,824
If you want to buy a good book, The Linux Bible is up to the 10th Edition and is a solid resource.

 
$100 Digital Ocean Credit
Get a free VM to test out Linux!

Members online


Top