Help, please anyone.

davidg33

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Hi guys and girls, I've been learning Linux for a couple of years on and off but now I've finally found time to get into it. So I've just spent 4 full days setting up desktop and getting comfortable. I thought I was happy so wanted to make a live usb and custom that so I could take it anywhere but struggled to find a way to do so unless I was running Windows to do the initial task at hand. But I was hunting anyways with hope I'd find a way and learn something new along the way.

But then I was getting Mardy that I was struggling to find a way or even a dead end saying it couldn't be done. I mean it's Linux there has to be a way.

So now to the problem at hand. I went to apt update and got about 40 errors saying no public key. I would be happy to upload images if they are needed. But if have to logon again as I've turned it off for now with the heat building. I was even looking to change system back to windows it's made me that mad, but I really want to keep going. You see I get mad but I enjoy it so much while I'm learning new things that can be done on the system and obviously playing with hacking tools for fun. Please help someone or anyone because I'm getting close to throwing the full lot in the bin and buying a new laptop but then it's back to bordom with nothing much to do than browse crap.

Help on the update issue would be great but if anyone wants to help on both issues I would be so thankful
 

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craigevil

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Comment all of the repos that are causing issues. Or even better remove them.
Also what distro are you using? The more info you post the better help you will receive.
 

stan

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Your screenshot errors look like you're running Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla). If that's true, your immediate problem is that 20.10 reaches end-of-life next week on July 22nd. After that, Ubuntu itself will also stop updating. This article can get you started to upgrade to 21.04, but that one also has just a short 9-month life cycle. Instead of short-term releases, I would suggest doing a full install of Ubuntu 20.04. It is the latest "LTS" (Long Term Support) version and will be updated until 2025.
 

davidg33

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Your screenshot errors look like you're running Ubuntu 20.10 (Groovy Gorilla). If that's true, your immediate problem is that 20.10 reaches end-of-life next week on July 22nd. After that, Ubuntu itself will also stop updating. This article can get you started to upgrade to 21.04, but that one also has just a short 9-month life cycle. Instead of short-term releases, I would suggest doing a full install of Ubuntu 20.04. It is the latest "LTS" (Long Term Support) version and will be updated until 2025.
How do I go about doing this please. I can't find any help of changing OS unless I use a USB but I can't find anything way of using a usb from Linux and I no longer have a Windows computer because I changed it to full run Linux. Thanks for your help.
 

davidg33

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Comment all of the repos that are causing issues. Or even better remove them.
Also what distro are you using? The more info you post the better help you will receive.
I downloaded it from Kali website. I think it's Kali 21.2 rolling but I will check when I finish work and let you know so 100%sure. Thanks for your help
 

brickwizard

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Kali is a popular distro , but not one to recommend to newer users, my choice would be start from scratch, if using an Ubuntu based distro make sure its based on a long term support version, or try a distro based on Debian stable .

Bwiz
 

e-flat minor 853

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I switched to Debian Linux a couple of months ago. I spent many hours over several months before that reading about different distros, their pluses and minuses. For each distro I considered, I read what I could find on their individual Web sites about installing, and I read the "install trouble" sections of several forums like this one. That gave me an idea of the problems I would run into, and also an idea of where I could find the information to fix my problems.

A big part of the difficulty is that essentially all the online information in the various distro Wikis is written for people who have already learned it but just need to refresh their memory. There is almost nothing for rank beginners, and Linux is extremely complicated. But you can find recommendations about which distros are good for beginners. Debian isn't good for beginners. I picked it because I wanted something very solid and with a very large number of users so it wouldn't dwindle away over time.

You picked Ubuntu, which is another distro with many users. Go to the Ubuntu Web site and read about all the different versions they have. You should be able to figure out which one is easier to install and work with. Stan above pointed you in this direction.
 

captain-sensible

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A big part of the difficulty is that essentially all the online information in the various distro Wikis is written for people who have already learned it but just need to refresh their memory.
There is a big element of truth in that and its along the lines of the writer not remembering what issues they had when they first started and because they know it, they tend to take it for granted that readers do to!

However your in luck on this site ' i think its fair to say apart from us not being psychic we usually know where most people are coming from , because we remember the pain and frustration when we were on a learning curve- Does it ever stop ?
 

brickwizard

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Debian isn't good for beginners. I picked it because I wanted something very solid
In the old days I would have agreed with you, but not now, debian stable is the solid base for many popular systems [yes it can be a pain to set up on certain equipment] even Ubuntu is a Debian based group of distributions [all be it with many extras and tweaks,] Mint [one of the popular distributions] has a Debian version Mx-linux which has been the most popular over the last 12 months is Debian stable based.
with over 300 different distributions out there and the choice of several different desktop styles there is something for nearly everyone

just remember Linux is not Windows, It will require the newcomer to invest a little time and effort going through a learning curve so please don’t give up, kick off your shoes, grab a drink and enjoy the ride.

Bwiz
 

captain-sensible

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But then I was getting Mardy that I was struggling...
I think they describe that as being "Par for the Course"
what i would say to you is that approach helps and then take things step by step ; observe , mull over feedback and digest.

A first step might be - hey i want to know how to use my Windows to put Linux onto a usb stick and boot from it. Then you go throug hthe steps to get that to work and spend quite some time just playing with OS

You can even get persistence working with Linux OS on a usb and thus play with software install. You got ppa in your in your image the approach to install timeshift would be:

know how to && check where your repo are coming from.


sudo apt install software-properties-common
//above helps with ppa
sudo apt-add-repository -y ppa:teejee2008/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install timeshift


So to get maximum satisfaction, minimum effort :
1) Develop a philosophical attitude and humor
2) first get to know the basics
3) Don't start Kali
 
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davidg33

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Thanks guys, I don't want to give up because I've found myself with time spare to learn more and more. How do I go about installing a fresh destro? It's installed my my laptop it's self but now I want to start a fresh with a destro for beginners. I don't know where start because I hit brick walls when trying to research.

I have done bits. I mean I've been working on learning for a while. It al started with rooting phones and I found an obsession with playing with things that could be changed. From that I looked up hacking and it led me to wanting to learn how things worked behind the doors of the manufacturing devices and programs
 

MatsuShimizu

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I don't know where start because I hit brick walls when trying to research.
You can follow this Youtube channel for easy-to-follow guides for beginners: LearnLinuxTV on Youtube.
I downloaded it from Kali website. I think it's Kali 21.2 rolling but I will check when I finish work and let you know so 100%sure. Thanks for your help
Based on your screenshot and your comment, it seems that you are trying to install Ubuntu PPA on Kali. I found the guide somewhere on the Kali forum but I'm not going to link it here. While I use Kali myself, I don't recommend Kali for beginners.
 
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brickwizard

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Ok David.. back to basics [see my signature when asking for help and answer the first part]
Do you have a working box which you can use to download and burn a new installation medium? [USB or DVD whichever is appropriate]
if yes to the first bit download a suitable ISO file of the distribution [depends on the full spec of your machine]
go through the installation process .. when you install you will be asked if you wish to download proprietary / non free drivers [wording may differ] mark to say yes and do your install.
I will not suggest any particular distro until we know what your equipment is as some brands/models may have their own peculiarities

Bwiz
 

davidg33

New Member
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Ok David.. back to basics [see my signature when asking for help and answer the first part]
Do you have a working box which you can use to download and burn a new installation medium? [USB or DVD whichever is appropriate]
if yes to the first bit download a suitable ISO file of the distribution [depends on the full spec of your machine]
go through the installation process .. when you install you will be asked if you wish to download proprietary / non free drivers [wording may differ] mark to say yes and do your install.
I will not suggest any particular distro until we know what your equipment is as some brands/models may have their own peculiarities

Bwiz
I do have a work Linux but I can't figure out how to burn iOS with Linux. Rufus would of been what I would of used but Linux isn't supported so now I have Linux installed on the laptop and no way of getting a new iOS.

Sorry I'm slow. I'm working 4 12 hour shifts at work then 4 off. But I'm in for 2 more days and got 12 off so I'm thinking I've got 12 days to figure it out and get back up and running. I've also got another laptop with windows getting fetched to me but unsure of when it will arrive
 

brickwizard

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there is an ISO/USB burning program that should be compatible with most Linux builds, and that is Unetboot [but many linux builds include one in the software manager]
https://unetbootin.github.io/

You still have not told us the make and model of your machine as many problems could be caused by component comparability
 

MatsuShimizu

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Rufus would of been what I would of used but Linux isn't supported so now I have Linux installed on the laptop and no way of getting a new iOS.
Cross-platform burning tools: Ventoy, Balena Etcher.
Download the installer(s) from the respective Github pages below.
 
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Condobloke

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Is there some confusion in this topic between iOS and ISO.................??
 

kc1di

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I would recommend downloading and using Etcher. It can be downloaded as an appimage and run without being installed on the system. It has a simple GUI interface and should do the job of burning the .ISO image for you.
Recommend you start with Linux Mint if your Machine will run it. Good luck.
 

davidg33

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120
Thanks all of you, I'm off work now and I'm going to take a crack at it again for the next 14 days to try and figure it out. I will keep you updated
 

Lord Boltar

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By default Ubuntu has Startup Disk Creator (usb-creator-gtk) through the Synaptic Package Manager works with Ubuntu based OS's like Linux Mint, Zorin, and anything else based on Buntu - if your OS is based on something else I use Etcher https://www.balena.io/etcher/

I see you are missing several public keys bust most are for Groovy which is expiring soon here is how to fix them
How to fix missing public key

Code:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys COPIED-NUMBER-HERE
example the Google Earth Key is 78BD65473CB3BD13

Code:
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv-keys 78BD65473CB3BD13
 
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