Using a DVD that normally uses Windows drivers

Jim65

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Recently, I bought a "25th Anniversary" package of Who Framed Roger Rabbit simply because I enjoyed watching the movie in the theaters and I also enjoy it. My computer is a Pop_Os computer that has a Linux based operating system installed. There are several different video viewers already downloaded and installed and ready to use. When I try to play this DVD, however, the video and the audio playback almost seem like a cable connection that is waiting to buffer the next section of whatever you are trying to watch. Both the video and audio pause briefly then pick up again without loss of either audio or video content. There is a ReadMe file on the DVD that is included here. What I would like, if possible, is to enjoy the film without any 'buffering' of the output of the content to the screen. Is there a way to enjoy this video without having to buy a Windows computer?
Jim65

Solved.
Jim65
 
Last edited:


Could be one of several problems
1] wrong type of DVD for the rom drive
2] wrong region settings
3] pirate copy
4]DRM not enabled

if you want an application similar to Windows Media Player, try [if you haven't already] VCL media player

Who Framed Roger Rabbit yes I liked that one as well
 
I wonder if there might also be some wrong codecs installed and all that jazz.

I am not sure how to test for that, off the top of my head (and I'm having issues today).
 
I agree that VLC is the way to go. but if you are having issues with the region I can give you some help there. since we do not know the flavor of linux you are using I am giving directions for Fedora and you can adapt the command as needed
first you need to install the utility to change region on the DVD drive.

dnf install regionset

run the command. regionset /dev/sr0 1 change sr0 to whatever your DVD is mounted as.
1 is US region code

you can always run regionset --help to get the list of commands that may be useful to you.
 
Could be one of several problems
1] wrong type of DVD for the rom drive
2] wrong region settings
3] pirate copy
4]DRM not enabled

if you want an application similar to Windows Media Player, try [if you haven't already] VCL media player

Who Framed Roger Rabbit yes I liked that one as well
The DVD was packaged as a set with both the DVD and the Blue-Ray copies inside. Several other feature length movies have been used in the same DVD drive without any problem. The DVD did not ask for region settings (probably would have if the Windows setup routine had worked). Because the total package was sealed by the studio, the fact of a 'pirate copy' of that DVD is doubtful. DRM has been enabled in all settings through the mail settings on the computer.
 
I agree that VLC is the way to go. but if you are having issues with the region I can give you some help there. since we do not know the flavor of linux you are using I am giving directions for Fedora and you can adapt the command as needed
first you need to install the utility to change region on the DVD drive.

dnf install regionset

run the command. regionset /dev/sr0 1 change sr0 to whatever your DVD is mounted as.
1 is US region code

you can always run regionset --help to get the list of commands that may be useful to you.
On almost all DVD and movies that I watch, VLC is the player of choice for all of them. I personally like the settings that program offers. As yet, I have not yet tried dnf install regionset but will very soon.
Thank you,
Jim65
 
I wonder if there might also be some wrong codecs installed and all that jazz.

I am not sure how to test for that, off the top of my head (and I'm having issues today)
On the codecs that are on the DVD with the movie I wanted to watch, there probably were some specific codecs in play specifically referencing a particular software item the company offered and tried to install.
Jim65
 
Could be one of several problems
1] wrong type of DVD for the rom drive
2] wrong region settings
3] pirate copy
4]DRM not enabled

if you want an application similar to Windows Media Player, try [if you haven't already] VCL media player

Who Framed Roger Rabbit yes I liked that one as well
Sorry about not fully identifying the computer. Here is a screen shot of the computer:
screen shot of system configuration
 

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Install and use VLC.

Do not alter its default settings

It will literally play anything
 
I use either VLC or Celluloid for DVDs on Mint and VLC on my win 7 VM with no problems.
m1213.gif


You could use HandBrake to copy the DVDs to MPEG-4 format and watch them on anything...then save them to an External HDD/SSD.
m1212.gif
 
I don't know a darned thing about Pop! other than that it's based on Ubuntu and meant for specific hardware - known to not work that well on hardware made by other vendors.

So, you can try the following:

sudo add-apt-repository multiverse

Then run the following:

sudo apt install ubuntu-restricted-extras

Then try to watch your video.

Edit: Oops... I didn't paste the proper command for the installation process.
 
Last edited:
Issue resolved. Thank to all that have offered help in this matter.
After careful consideration, I have come to the conclusion that there are only two options available: 1) Accept the playback of the video copy that I now have any enjoy the movie with the 'buffering' and partial skipping of very small parts of the action. 2) Weaken and try to buy an expensive Windows computer that has a DVD player built in and hope that is one the included software wants to find.
My choice is Option 1, to enjoy the film as it plays on my computer.
Jim65
 
An unfortunate compromise that evidently you have to make as a film viewer. Two things come to mind, firstly to keep the linux video player that you are using up to date since if it is the software that is the problem, it will likely in time be resolved. Secondly, is to try and use the facilities that mplayer provides to try and get rid of the buffering and skipping. The mplayer man page has over 100 screenfuls of information and options (in my moderate font), and it's not a trivial matter to learn to use them to try and resolve video issues, but the level of control offered by the program is of a very high order. I can't say such an investigation would resolve the issues, but I don't know of any other video player that offers such. YMMV.
 
I don't know a darned thing about Pop! other than that it's based on Ubuntu and meant for specific hardware - known to not work that well on hardware made by other vendors.

So, you can try the following:


sudo apt install ubuntu-restricted-extras

Then try to watch your video.

Edit: Oops... I didn't paste the proper command for the installation process.
This command I did try. It did take a reboot of the computer following the installation of that program. It does work and the 'buffering' is much less than before.
@KGIII, thank you for sharing this to the group.

This situation has been resolved and can be closed.
Jim65
 
This situation has been resolved and can be closed.

Excellent. You can edit your first post and pick 'solved' on the left to let folks know that you've reached a conclusion with this problem.

I will mention again that System76 optimizes POP!_OS for their hardware and that there are often issues with it on more generic hardware. There are other, more general-use, distros out there should you decide to move on from that distro.
 

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