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Today's article is a weird one, about using Tor while using T-Mobile as your hotspot.

KGIII

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T-Mobile (and other mobile providers, they're not unique in this) disallow Tor. It will simply sit there and not let you connect.

What you need to do, and I used my VPN for this, is configure a proxy. If you do that, you can connect.

This isn't just applicable to Linux users, surely. I'm sure this will work for anyone tethered to a T-Mobile connection. You also don't need a paid VPN for this. There are a zillion free proxy servers out there, and pretty much any of them should work - unless they too block Tor. If that's the case, just pick another one.

Sadly, from my research, a number of mobile providers disallow Tor access. So, now you can bypass that if you want.


This article is only going to appeal to a small subset of people, but I think it was worth sharing. Feedback pleases me...
 


Nah, it's (I assume) everyone using T-Mobile.

Glad to see the article helped.
 
T-Mobile (and other mobile providers, they're not unique in this) disallow Tor. It will simply sit there and not let you connect.

What you need to do, and I used my VPN for this, is configure a proxy. If you do that, you can connect.

This isn't just applicable to Linux users, surely. I'm sure this will work for anyone tethered to a T-Mobile connection. You also don't need a paid VPN for this. There are a zillion free proxy servers out there, and pretty much any of them should work - unless they too block Tor. If that's the case, just pick another one.

Sadly, from my research, a number of mobile providers disallow Tor access. So, now you can bypass that if you want.


This article is only going to appeal to a small subset of people, but I think it was worth sharing. Feedback pleases me...
And why are they blocking Tor? My provider uses Verizon's network and I've never had an issue. You can even get the tor browser app on the play store. I think T-Mobile should worry more about keeping their customers data secure rather than censoring people.
 
And why are they blocking Tor?

Probably because they assume anyone using Tor is doing so for illicit or malicious reasons.

But, I mean, I didn't email them and ask. I'm told that AT&T, Mint, and one other carrier whose name I've forgotten block Tor. So, it's not all that unusual. I've been in hotels that also block Tor and, strangely, SSH. Fortunately, I usually use SSH on a non-standard port.
 
Probably because they assume anyone using Tor is doing so for illicit or malicious reasons.

But, I mean, I didn't email them and ask. I'm told that AT&T, Mint, and one other carrier whose name I've forgotten block Tor. So, it's not all that unusual. I've been in hotels that also block Tor and, strangely, SSH. Fortunately, I usually use SSH on a non-standard port.
Tor nodes come and go all the time, and it is a challenge to maintain those lists of Tor exit nodes. If you are trying to get to a website that is blocking Tor connections, try "New Tor Circuit for this Site". If you keep trying new circuits, eventually you should get through. Sometimes it takes patience.

I tried it on Linux Mint's website. Sure enough, it was blocked. I tried "new Tor Circuit for this Site" approximately ten times before I got through to the Linux Mint webpage through Tor.
 
Tor nodes come and go all the time, and it is a challenge to maintain those lists of Tor exit nodes.

In this case, they're blocking the connection from the very start. Multiple tries don't do anything. I suspect that it's a port block or traffic shaping block. Though if the latter it's not that great as I got around it fairly easily.

I also see what you're describing with my VPN. Some sites don't like VPN traffic. So, you just try a few different servers and one of 'em will finally let you in.
 
In this case, they're blocking the connection from the very start. Multiple tries don't do anything. I suspect that it's a port block or traffic shaping block. Though if the latter it's not that great as I got around it fairly easily.

I also see what you're describing with my VPN. Some sites don't like VPN traffic. So, you just try a few different servers and one of 'em will finally let you in.
We are conflating two different types of filtration. The two types happen on opposite sides of the Tor network:
  • (1) The Linux Tips Scenario (extended by me): ISPs, Mobile Providers, and Governments Block Access To The Tor Network.
    • This matches the Linux Tips hint, which uses T-Mobile as the example.
      • I assume it also matches your mention of AT&T and the other carrier you do not remember.
    • Some governments block Tor to prevent their citizens from bypassing the officially approved networks. Tor refers to it as censorship and your Linux Tip as circumvention.
    • The ISPs, mobile providers (T-Motile), and governments use deep packet inspection tools to filter Tor and VPN traffic.
    • Users can attempt to bypass the filtration by using a VPN or other means. There are a variety of methods and plug-ins that can be used.
      • Tor has documentation on its website about bypassing censorship. See:
        https://tb-manual.torproject.org
        • Look at the Circumvention and also the Bridges sections. Some of the same material is in the Linux Tip.
    • Even in this scenario there are two types of users:
      • The ones who are more concerned about establishing the Tor connection and have no concerns about being caught doing it.
      • The ones where any detected Tor or VPN use is very dangerous. In those cases, it is best to self-filter if there is any chance of detection at all. (Read: Repressive government.)
  • (2) My Scenario: Websites blocking access to Tor and VPNs on the web server side.
    • This is what I was describing in my post above about Linux Mint blocking Tor-sourced traffic. I assume it is the same when you said "Mint". (I do not think of Mint as an ISP.)
    • The websites see the usual connection from an IP address to their port 443 (or 80), whether through Tor, a VPN, or the user's home network. It looks the same as other traffic to their websites, other than the source IP addresses.
    • The only information they have to determine block/allow decisions is the source IP address of the inbound connection.
    • In the example above with the Linux Mint website, I demonstrated that not all Tor exit nodes are blocked, by changing them until one got through.
It may be worthwhile for Tor users to read the manual here:
https://tb-manual.torproject.org
 
We are conflating two different types of filtration.

Right. My article is about the initial block, where T-Mobile simply disallows connecting to the network.

Anything else is kinda off topic, but it's all good. I'm merely addressing this part of it. It was easy enough to get around the block, so it got an article.
 
Right. My article is about the initial block, where T-Mobile simply disallows connecting to the network.

Anything else is kinda off topic, but it's all good. I'm merely addressing this part of it. It was easy enough to get around the block, so it got an article.
I saw "Mint" in your post. As far as I know, Mint is not a service provider but a website that tries to block Tor, so I added the comment about website blocking.
-> I should have clarified the differences better.
 
LOL Mint - the mobile phone company/service provider.

https://www.mintmobile.com/
Aha! It would not be the first time I missed the punchline. That clarifies a lot.

I just saw a post about websites that block Tor. Linux Mint was specifically mentioned and an easy target for me. I can't find that reference now. It doesn't matter. The basics are in this thread here.
 

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