Today's article is a silly listicle...

KGIII

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I've never done a 'top ten' type of article before. So, I did one. I figured it'd be fun and quick. It was mostly fun but it was not quick. In fact,, it's a long article when compared to many of my other articles. It's certainly not the longest, but it's up there.


Those are my top ten reasons. If you don't like my list, you can write your own. In fact, I encourage you to do so.

Heck, I'm not scared. I'd probably publish another article that was "Linux.org's Top 10 Reasons For Using Linux". Probably... I mean, not right away, but some time in the future.
 


My number one is...It's not windoze.
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My number one is...It's not windoze.
m1211.gif

That is indeed on my list.

Another excuse that I can use is that I don't have enough bandwidth for whatever it is they're asking me to do. Lots of people wanted me to do video chat during the pandemic. Nope. I don't have enough bandwidth for that.
 
"If there’s a task someone wants me to do online, such as have an online meeting, I can just tell them that I don’t use Windows."
i use this line when people ask about facebook. LOL
 
"If there’s a task someone wants me to do online, such as have an online meeting, I can just tell them that I don’t use Windows."
i use this line when people ask about facebook. LOL

Forum-esque social media is the only form of social media that I really use. I sometimes visit Reddit which really just a collection of forums.
 
1. I'm tired of being a slave to the Giant.
  • There are many things I want to be able to do. Rather than a fun challenge, the obstacles have become a burden.
  • I spend more and more time to figuring out if I legitimate problem or if it's another "Update". My version is no longer supported. They have no reason to secretly download and install anything at all. I haven't found a way to prevent them from doing this or had the time to do it. The frequency of their antics has been increasing since they literally hijacked computers in the summer of 2015.
  • They deceive people. I've worked in sales. A sales person can answer any question in such a way as to lead you to a conclusion that benefits them. The Giant does that.
  • BTW, I think the reason I did well in sales is because I didn't do that.
2. In my experience, the Linux community is very friendly and welcoming.
  • As with any large group of people, I'm sure there are instances of aggravation with people.
  • Although I'm new to the community, I haven't noticed anything serious and I haven't seen anyone seem to hold a grudge against anyone.

3. People in the community are not only willing, but eager to help.
  • They've been patient with me.
  • If I've ruffled any feathers, they never said so. I suspect I have. If I did, they moved past it.
  • I know of at least one very friendly person who reportedly got pretty frustrated with someone. As I understand it, he took a deep breath and went on helping that person.

4. My initial impression of Linux was that it would be intimidating.
  • Nearly every article or tutorial I found made it seem like everything would be done from the terminal.
  • I didn't like the idea of memorizing every single "command" to do anything. That sounded too much like DOS.
  • During the times of DOS, I couldn't touch type. Typos were a constant problem for me. Locating a file in the directory took entirely too long. If not the mouse, I probably never would have began using a computer to begin with.

5.After taking the plunge, I found out Linux is not nearly as intimidating as I thought it would be.
  • I think for the average user, switching to Linux would be fairly easy if they are willing to learn a few things.
  • I think switching might be like changing from Windows to Mac, or from an Android to an iPhone.

6. I do know touch type now.
  • I can see what I'm typing as I make mistakes. I'm a lot faster now. I can see most mistakes as I type them, back space and correct.
  • I'm so worried about remembering commands and making mistakes.
  • Honestly, if I couldn't type and weren't as fast as I've become, I might have just accepted my lot in life as slave to the Giant.

7. Linux is free.

  • Someone somewhere does everything to make software, updates and versions available. It seems I get new updates everyday.
  • Those people MUST have passion for what they are doing. They must love collaborating and sharing ideas, what works, what doesn't.
  • For something like this to work, problems with ego simply can't be a big problem. This wouldn't work if it was. This is a rare thing and I get to be part of it.
  • I might not contribute much. I might only help other people in the future. I might not contribute anything or help anyone at all. But I'm still welcome.

8. Linux is as easy or as difficult as I want.
  • If I didn't want to do more with an operating system and I didn't enjoy challenges, it would be hard.
  • If I expect other people to make things easy for me and I were self righteous, my expectations would make Linus difficult.
  • If I didn't appreciate the efforts of all those people, if I weren't willing to put in any effort to figure things out on my own I would be angry.
  • If I approached this expecting customer service I would be aggravated. When I don't get it, I might have just as admonition as I have for other OS's but for different reasons.

9. There is A LOT of software to choose from.
  • If I don't like something, there is surely something else I like more.
  • If I'm dead set on Windows based software and willing to make the effort, it is possible to use them.
  • If I have trouble doing it, someone is out there who can help me.

10. I'm not a slave to the Giant anymore.

  • This is the number one reason.
  • Looking at back at what I've written, I can see that I'm still getting use to this idea. Some of my statements are written as though I'm still enslaved. It will take time.
  • Someone pointed out to me that I was "hating" on the Giant.
  • Calling it something else helps. I'm glad it was pointed out to me.
  • Calling it something else helps me disassociate and let go of my frustration.
  • That lets me enjoy Linux even more.
 
Nearly every article or tutorial I found made it seem like everything would be done from the terminal.

Lots of people seem to think this. It's not really true, but that's what they think.

Now, most of the articles on my site use the terminal. It's much closer to universal when you do it in the terminal. I also want to help people get used to using the terminal and I make it a point to try to keep it approachable for even a novice Linux user.
 
Lots of people seem to think this. It's not really true, but that's what they think.

Now, most of the articles on my site use the terminal. It's much closer to universal when you do it in the terminal. I also want to help people get used to using the terminal and I make it a point to try to keep it approachable for even a novice Linux user.
Even the terminal tries to help me!

When I was installing NordVPN and ran into a problem, the terminal told me why and what command to use to fix it. You can't get more friendly than that!
 
Here is an answer from Google's Gemini, formerly Bard, on the question of running on terminals:

Is it possible to run all linux programs from the terminal?​

No, it's not possible to run all Linux programs from the terminal. Although the terminal is incredibly powerful and used for many tasks, it has limitations:

1. GUI Applications: Many programs are designed for graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and rely on libraries and components outside the terminal environment. Trying to launch them via terminal often won't work, even if their executable files exist.

2. Interpreted Languages: Programs written in interpreted languages like Python, Ruby, or Javascript usually require their specific interpreters to run, which might not be accessible directly from the terminal. You'd typically need to run the script file containing the code through the interpreter (e.g., python script.py).

3. Permissions and Environment: Even for programs with executable files, you might not have the necessary permissions to run them or the right environment variables set up. Terminal execution relies on specific configurations that might not be suitable for every program.
However, the terminal excels at running programs designed for command-line interaction, scripts, system tools, and utilities. Many applications also offer command-line options alongside their graphical interfaces for advanced users.
Here's a breakdown:
Run from Terminal:
  • Command-line programs
  • Scripts
  • Utilities
  • Some applications with command-line options
Not Run from Terminal:
  • Pure GUI applications
  • Programs requiring specific interpreters
  • Programs lacking proper permissions or environment
Remember, the terminal shines in automation, system administration, and advanced tasks. While it can't do everything, it's still an indispensable tool for Linux users!
 
Here is an answer from Google's Gemini, formerly Bard, on the question of running on terminals:

Pure GUI, obviously you can't run a GUI without a GUI. Ok I concede that one.

Programs that require specific interpreters? What interpreter is there that "HAS" to run in a GUI that will not run in a console?
I would interested to see such a list.

Programs that lack proper permissions? What permissions are in a GUI that I can't have in a console?

These last two don't make sense to me.
 
I just watched a Linus Tech Tips video about how to set up your Windows computer, including the basics from getting it while new.

The level of pure unadulterated horse crap you have to go through to make it usable is astounding.

And I'm the guy that's NICE to Microsoft. I'm the guy that's polite and calls them MSFT.
 
Pure GUI, obviously you can't run a GUI without a GUI. Ok I concede that one.

Programs that require specific interpreters? What interpreter is there that "HAS" to run in a GUI that will not run in a console?
I would interested to see such a list.

Programs that lack proper permissions? What permissions are in a GUI that I can't have in a console?

These last two don't make sense to me.
I'm not able to answer those questions @dos2unix. The Gemini output would have benefited from a more expansive answer. My own interpretation was that some GUI programs call other programs, or executables, which the user cannot call themselves because they lack the permissions, and, although root can call programs, it's not generally appropriate for GUIs, not in X anyway. The programs in the /usr/libexec directory might qualify, but I can't say.
 
I just watched a Linus Tech Tips video about how to set up your Windows computer, including the basics from getting it while new.

The level of pure unadulterated horse crap you have to go through to make it usable is astounding.

And I'm the guy that's NICE to Microsoft. I'm the guy that's polite and calls them MSFT.
I looked for that video. From the titles, it could be one of many. I has some long videos too. Would you mind posting a link?

I don't know if 10 and 11 are like signing into 8.1 or not. When I was force fed 8.1, I had to sign into Microsoft account before I could load the desktop. I just spent a lot of good money on a new tower that I wasn't allowed to use unless I complied. I don't remember how I did it now, but I somehow got around having to get an MS account I didn't want.
 
From the titles, it could be one of many. I has some long videos too. Would you mind posting a link?

It's from yesterday or the day before. It's lost to my history now.
 
It's from yesterday or the day before. It's lost to my history now.
If it's the one for the gaming system...

That's pretty much the norm if you want to do anything out of the ordinary.
 
@KGIII

Oh there's more...

  • TPM... Ah yes, my all time favorite BS along with Group Policy Settings. In Win 8.1, I'm not considered a member of that group and therefore I can't edit them. I ran into this problem when I tried to install VM to try out Linux. I found a work around, but I ran out of time. Had to get to that divorce!
  • Bloatware BLOATWARE BLOATWARE. I'm not allowed to uninstall any of it.
  • Windows never finds all the driver updates, not for integrated devices and especially not for anything you install yourself.
  • In the device manager there is an option to check for updates. You'll get a message that Windows already has the latest driver. If you want to know you have the latest, go to the manufacturer website. Never count on Windows to keep your drivers up to date.
  • Secure boot... Ran into this one when I tried install Win7 on a separate HDD. I had to go into Legacy Settings. Thank God I don't have a generic MOBO. If I did, might not have found out how to do it.
  • Microsoft tools make problems somewhere else.
  • Drive 0 Total space 25GB Free Space 25GB I'm pretty sure I ran into that one when I tried to install Linux alongside Windows. NOTHING WORKED AFTER THAT
  • The MS account requirement, TRUE. I'm glad I figured how to disable that one. Otherwise I would I have sign into it every time I want to use my PC.
  • Yes, make sure you restore from that Microsoft account of you don't make your own restore disc. They don't make that part so obvious. But then most people blindly follow the Giant's orders to a "T"
  • Windows firewall, useless and glitchy. But perhaps most importantly, Windows Firewall doesn't you from MS.
  • USB drivers in the Device Manager, which one is which
  • Microsoft Analytics.... and they say Winows is protecting your privacy...
  • Send "Diagnostic Data to Microsoft".... ditto
  • Network settings, at least on Windows 8.1, it's not so easy to change them. More than one way to get them. Some of them take a lot more steps to finally get to place where you can change them and some dont get you there at all. Good luck if you want to change anything in IPV4 or IPV6 settings.
  • Mouse acceleration, what for???
  • "Windows Hello"? Not in Win8.1 but if it was... HELL NO! My password is 14 characters, some of them longer, some characters + "shift" and I type pretty fast too. And then there's encryption .
My GAWD!

Maybe I shouldn't have watched that!

They didn't talk about this, but troubleshooter never works and neither do restore points. In 20 plus years I can't remember a single time a restore actually worked when needed it to.

Windows is already a pain. It took a lot of time figuring out all those little secrets. Linux has a reputation for being even harder. Thank God it's not.

There are few things in that video I could have used, but I don't need them anymore.
 
Lots of people seem to think this. It's not really true, but that's what they think.

Now, most of the articles on my site use the terminal. It's much closer to universal when you do it in the terminal. I also want to help people get used to using the terminal and I make it a point to try to keep it approachable for even a novice Linux user.
From my experience, playing around with things is the best way to learn. The only problem for me is remembering which of the various things I tried got the result I was looking for!
 
For me, the #1 thing I like is that it's FAST! By that I mean, when I turn on the computer, I don't have to go take a shower or something waiting for everything to load. And then go dry my hair while waiting for a browser to launch. I'm only exaggerating a little. My Windows OS was a DOG. "Something is running in the background," they said. So I open the task manager and, yeah, there are programs running. But how am I supposed to know which is the offending program?

Another plus is my computer doesn't turn back on overnight. I thought I was losing my mind for awhile. I knew I turned it off, but it would be on in the morning. Lots of crazy things like that were happening.

Oh, and forced Windows updates that take an hour to complete. And something would always get screwed up after an update. Every single time.

Linux has been a learning curve, but I'm so glad to be done with the constant dysfunction and drag of Windows. It's fast and clean. I like it a lot. :cool:
 

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