[SOLVED] Slave drive not accessible

VantaBlack

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I'm quite new to linux....
I'm not able to access my hard drive ((OS is installed on an ssd, that is accessible with no issues)) while I can able to access it through windows, it shows up in lsblk but not in GParted ((I mean, it does show up in GParted when I choose it from the top right menu, but it does not show the proper partitions, only shows the drive as one whole)), also if it helps, the HD was a dynamic drive in windows, could that be causing the issue? Is there any way for me to access it through linux? Pls help
 


Brickwizard

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unless you partitioned the drive when you installed windows then it will only show a a single partition drive

which distribution of linux are you using
 

stan

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also if it helps, the HD was a dynamic drive in windows, could that be causing the issue?
Yep. And if you aren't careful, you may lose your data on that drive. Your best bet is to go to Windows and remove this "feature" from your drive and/or copy your important data somewhere else... but we don't do Windows support, so you'll have to figure that out or get help from a Windows forum. Once you have protected your data, format the drive to something "normal" like NTFS or FAT32. Linux will then be able to access the drive.

Here are some old links (because LDM is an old technology)... these will give you an idea of how ugly this problem is:

https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/admin-guide/ldm.html

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/8427372/windows-spanned-disks-ldm-restoration-with-linux

Good luck!
 
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VantaBlack

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Yep. And if you aren't careful, you may lose your data on that drive. Your best bet is to go to Windows and remove this "feature" from your drive and/or copy your important data somewhere else... but we don't do Windows support, so you'll have to figure that out or get help from a Windows forum. Once you have protected your data, format the drive to something "normal" like NTFS or FAT32. Linux will then be able to access the drive.

Here are some old links (because LDM is an old technology)... these will give you an idea of how ugly this problem is:

https://www.kernel.org/doc/html/latest/admin-guide/ldm.html

https://stackoverflow.com/questions/8427372/windows-spanned-disks-ldm-restoration-with-linux

Good luck!
I can't rlly do it in windows, my windows bricked itself after an update, soo that's that ((Also, according to what I found on an windows forum I would loose all data if I were to convert it from dynamic to normal using windows, so yeah))
I've backed up all the important data onto a USB drive, so I'll try to get it back to normal now...
Thanks for the help btw
 
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VantaBlack

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alright, got it to ntfs now, and gparted says its "Mounted on /mnt" but also gives the warning
"Unable to read the contents of this file system!
Because of this some operations may be unavailable.
The cause might be a missing software package.
The following list of software packages is required for ntfs file system support: ntfs-3g / ntfsprogs."
also, it still does not show up in file manager
 

stan

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alright, got it to ntfs now
You might describe how you formatted to NTFS because something is obviously wrong.


The following list of software packages is required for ntfs file system support: ntfs-3g / ntfsprogs."
I'm not familiar with PearOS, but on my system ntfsprogs does not seem to be needed by gparted, or does not seem to be installed. You can see if you have ntfs-3g with this command in a terminal: which ntfs-3g and see if it returns a location, such as /bin/ntfs-3g or /usr/bin/ntfs-3g. I think that this is usually included with most distros, but you may need to install it if you don't get any response to this command.


gparted says its "Mounted on /mnt" but also gives the warning
"Unable to read the contents of this file system!
It is odd to be mounted on /mnt.... did you do this yourself? Can show show us a screenshot of your gparted showing this drive? In particular, open gparted's "View" menu at the top and tick the box for "Device information"... this will show more details about the drive on the left. Resize your gparted screen so everything is visible before making the screenshot.

Also show us the output of this command: lsblk.... that is LSBLK but all lower case.
 
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VantaBlack

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You might describe how you formatted to NTFS because something is obviously wrong.



I'm not familiar with PearOS, but on my system ntfsprogs does not seem to be needed by gparted, or does not seem to be installed. You can see if you have ntfs-3g with this command in a terminal: which ntfs-3g and see if it returns a location, such as /bin/ntfs-3g or /usr/bin/ntfs-3g. I think that this is usually included with most distros, but you may need to install it if you don't get any response to this command.



It is odd to be mounted on /mnt.... did you do this yourself? Can show show us a screenshot of your gparted showing this drive? In particular, open gparted's "View" menu at the top and tick the box for "Device information"... this will show more details about the drive on the left. Resize your gparted screen so everything is visible before making the screenshot.

Also show us the output of this command: lsblk.... that is LSBLK but all lower case.
yeah, I was trying to mount it, I did mount it myself on mnt, anywho I was able to get it working now by following a tutorial I found online...
The drive shows up as it should in file manager/explorer

So, its pretty much solved now, thanks for the help anyway
 
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