Seeking to install Linux on my NUC PC.

richard1192

New Member
Joined
Apr 30, 2024
Messages
3
Reaction score
1
Credits
40
Hi. I think it's time to try Linux. I have a NUC PC (NUC5PPYH N3700 having a 5th generation intel CPU) to install Linux on. I've just started to do some reading up, so I might gain an appreciation of generally how to install Linux. I'll probably face hardware issues in my journey, but I'll make a post elsewhere when I cross them. I don't use PC for games, but I mostly use YouTube, PDF Exchange, LibreOffice. One day I may try to install a CAD app. Not sure what distro to install: Maybe Mint.
 
Last edited:


Have a read and read as many times as needed.

Linux Mint
 
Welcome to the forums
see,
I have a NUC PC
is this a canyon mini pc from around 2015 ? if so, it is accredited to work with almost all Linux distributions

 
I've ran several different distro's on this NUC. The only problem with this particular one is that it doesn't have a 1/8 inch audio jack. So you have to use a USB adapter for sound, but other than that, it works great. Audio, video, network, Wi-Fi, all work fine.
 

Attachments

  • 20240430_082434.jpg
    20240430_082434.jpg
    1.5 MB · Views: 41
you should also try fedora as it is a major release and works well for me and my clients...

www.fedoraproject.org
 
Hi. I decided that the first thing I would do, is seek to do a file integrity check & an authenticity check. On a particular webisite, I downloaded into a folder sha256sum.txt & sha256sum.txt.gpg as well as the iso file, I must be doing right because I get a sum when I run CertUtil in DOS. The command I'm using is: "CertUtil -hashfile linuxmint-21.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso" The problem is, when I compare the sum with the ones in sha256sum.txt, I cannot find a match. I've done the sum for two different downloads (two different mirrors) and they come out identical. I don't know whats wrong.
EDIT: I now know my error. the command should be: "CertUtil -hashfile linuxmint-21.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso SHA256" File integrity OK.
 
Last edited:
Don’t download an iso from a third party. If Mint, go to Mint website etc…
 
Hi. I decided that the first thing I would do, is seek to do a file integrity check & an authenticity check. On a particular webisite, I downloaded into a folder sha256sum.txt & sha256sum.txt.gpg as well as the iso file, I must be doing right because I get a sum when I run CertUtil in DOS. The command I'm using is: "CertUtil -hashfile linuxmint-21.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso" The problem is, when I compare the sum with the ones in sha256sum.txt, I cannot find a match. I've done the sum for two different downloads (two different mirrors) and they come out identical. I don't know whats wrong.
EDIT: I now know my error. the command should be: "CertUtil -hashfile linuxmint-21.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso SHA256" File integrity OK.
checksums only help in very specific scenarios. Like ML says, if it came from the official website, then it's probably OK. I'm too lazy to bother with the checksums, and am also too lazy to bother with so many different forms of software (IMO this is a good thing).

More (possibly false) info if that doesn't satisfy your need to be sure:

 
I actually downloaded Mint, from https://www.linuxmint.com/. From a mirror server located at Harvard School of Engineering. Cinnamon Edition. I got a pass on the file integrity check, but did not get the authenticy check to work. Perhaps, given from where I downloaded the iso file, this is uneccessary. Or perhaps where I got sha256sum.txt & sha256sum.txt.gpg from, which was the same linux mint website indicated above (in the url). Perhaps now I can proceed to install Mint on my NUC5PPYH. I will overwrite the Windows OS that is on it. There is non of my data on it. EDIT: Actually the authenticty check did work, but I got "This key is not certified with a trusted signature", which I've taken as possibly problematic. But, I think, not. Gut feeling.
 
Last edited:
There was a Linux Mint hack some years ago and the downloaded .iso didn't match the checksum. All sorts of people downloaded it but it does indicate one thing - and that is that someone will eventually check the file's integrity and let it be known if it doesn't match.

For better or worse, I don't always check. I should, but I do not.
 
I never check the hash sum or verify the download.
I'll know when I boot the media I created if the download is good.
I guess if ya feel better by doing so then have at it.
Getting a good check sum verification don't mean the download is good.
 
I never check the checksums, never had issue either but checking them might be good habit to get into
 
Over a year ago I downloaded Mint Cinnamon 21.1...checksum said ok. I installed it...a few days later the internet stopped working and in the Home Folder two main Folders were missing.

The ISO was downloaded from Mint's site...I downloaded from another mirror on the site and everything was good...you never know.
1714609823220.gif
 
Checking the checksums is useful when one has an issue when using the .iso. Often the issue is trouble with freezes during the installation using the .iso, but there are plenty of other symptoms a faulty .iso can manifest. The point of checking the checksums in these situations is simply to try and eliminate the .iso as the cause of the problem. Once the .iso has been verified, then one can have more confidence in checking other system elements that may be implicated like video drivers etc. Usually, the experience here has been that the copied .isos have worked so there was no need to use the checksums.
 
I have always been under the impression that checking the .iso, ruled out the possibility that .iso had been fiddled with by persons unknown....maybe had malware etc inserted etc
 
There is a not bad article here

https://linuxsecurity.com/features/what-are-checksums-why-should-you-be-using-them

which says in part

Why Do You Need Checksums?​


Checksums can have many uses. To list a few:


  • Detection of data corruption or loss when data is stored, such as on disks
  • Detection of data corruption or loss during data transmission.
  • Detection of purposeful and harmful efforts to modify the contents of data

Checksums can help protect against accidental data corruption or loss, as well as deliberate data tampering or deletion, which can occur as a result of cyber-attacks or deliberate attempts by individuals to alter data without detection, and they can help keep track of the integrity of your files and data. Whether you are using Ubuntu or Rocky Linux or whatever it may be, it is always good to create checksums for files you might have or files you download to keep track and to avoid potentially huge security issues. Additionally, checksums are generally small files and are easy to store so if storage is ever an issue, you won’t have to worry too much about storing checksum files and them taking space.

You could conceivably have a brief power glitch while you are downloading, and that can be enough to alter the downloaded result to fail to match a checksum.

That happened to me in September 2014... not a frequent occurrence, but possible.

Wizard
 

Staff online

Members online


Top