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Need help woth kali.

DeathReeks

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Ok so im obviously new, made a mistake; I installed kali linux on my computer, install went perfect, but now whenever I try booting into it whether its normal boot or recovery mode, it gives me "Loading initial ramdisk" and goes to a black screen. No cursor or anything just black, it also turns off my mouse and keyboard. I have already tried removing "quiet splash" many times to no avail.
Also possibly worth noting is that I have an Nvidia gpu but I honestly don't know.
 


enter the grub menu on startup and add nomodeset

during startup when the grub menu starts tap the "E" key to edit the grub menu - it should look similar to this below is for Ubuntu, but since Kali is based on Debian and Ubuntu is based on Debian it should be similar - scroll down to the "linux" line use the "E" key to edit, make the change and press F10 to continue to boot

menu1.jpeg
 
If you have to ask you probably shouldn't be using Kali.
 
If you have to ask you probably shouldn't be using Kali.
Yes i have already recognized it as being a mistake, thats why i honestly dont know it I plan on keeping it or changing to an easier distro like ubuntu.
 
enter the grub menu on startup and add nomodeset

during startup when the grub menu starts tap the "E" key to edit the grub menu - it should look similar to this below is for Ubuntu, but since Kali is based on Debian and Ubuntu is based on Debian it should be similar - scroll down to the "linux" line use the "E" key to edit, make the change and press F10 to continue to boot

View attachment 18682
Just tried that and unfortunately no, the same thing happens even when i add that.
 
i honestly dont know it I plan on keeping it or changing to an easier distro like ubuntu.

Kali themselves make a couple of suggestions that people tend to not follow, among them is that you should be an experienced Linux user before using Kali. Another is that it should be run in a live instance or in a virtual machine.

So, yeah... Spend some time with a real desktop Linux. Ubuntu is fine if you like GNOME. If you prefer a different DE, there are many official flavors. There's Linux Mint, which is well liked and can be easier for people to acclimate to. I'm on Team Lubuntu as a matter of preference and effort.
 
Yes i have already recognized it as being a mistake,
This is what happens when a newbie jumps in with both feet instead Of reading the documentation before attempting an installation,

I do not recommend but suggest,
Mint LMDE
Mint [ubuntu based]
any of the Ubuntu family
Linux lite
MX-linux [especially the AHS build if your computer is under 2 yrs old]
Parrot sec [if you want to learn pen-testing]
Parrot home edition [general purpose]
Peppermint
Debian with driver pack
to name but a few
 
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Kali themselves make a couple of suggestions that people tend to not follow, among them is that you should be an experienced Linux user before using Kali. Another is that it should be run in a live instance or in a virtual machine.
Honestly the reason I still went throygh with it is because I was going to just have it on ym computer so i could get familiar with it and learn as I go but kind of useless if I cant evem reach the desktop.
 
Honestly the reason I still went throygh with it is because I was going to just have it on ym computer so i could get familiar with it and learn as I go but kind of useless if I cant evem reach the desktop.

If you were me, or if I were you, I'd install a more common (better supported) distro - like something from the Ubuntu family that has a ton of support and documentation. I'd then install VirtualBox and use that to install Kali in a Virtual Machine.

Alternatively, I'd create a live Kali USB, perhaps with persistence, and run Kali from a live environment.

I'd preferentially go with the former option. The "Ubuntu family" bit includes other derivatives - such as Linux Mint. If Ubuntu isn't quite your ideal, there's LMDE - based on Debian. Of course, Ubuntu is also based on Debian.

But, that's just what would happen if our roles were reversed. You can still tinker with Kali, but you get to do so with a stable desktop Linux environment to deal with the daily computing tasks. You can get away with just a bit of patience and only a couple of GB thrown at the RAM in the guest operating system. If you have more RAM to spare, you can certainly assign more to the guest. VirtualBox makes this easy and (I think) self-explanatory. It's a straightforward exercise that anyone familiar with computers can figure out easily enough.
 
@DeathReeks
Do yourself a favor . . . Install Linux Mint. Use it for 6 months to get your feet wet in Linux. Don't rush it. Learn how to do things well, not in a hurry. "Quality instead of Quantity."
After 6 months you should be proficient enough to venture out in the more complicated part of the Linux World.
Enjoy the journey.
Old Geezer
Tango Charlie
 
It's a straightforward exercise that anyone familiar with computers can figure out easily enough.
True, the VM environment comes with just a few extra challenges, but uses practically no resources and poses absolutely no risk to hardware. It's a no brainer for someone who wants to "learn as they go"
 
Do yourself a favor . . . Install Linux Mint. Use it for 6 months to get your feet wet in Linux. Don't rush it.
I, like OP also wanted to "learn as I go" and chose Kali as my first distro, simply because it seemed like more fun. Now that I actually got a taste of it I'm ready to move onto something else... As an OS it requires too much micromanaging, but as a tool kit for specific purposes I can definitely see the appeal. I will look at Parrot Sec to learn more about pen testing, but am still undecided on which distro I'll use as a working OS to practice on..

I like Mint but if it's going to be a pain to install applications I'd rather run a distro with more tools geared towards Android app development like BBQ... even though BBQ still lacks most of the tools I need anyway...
 
I like Mint but if it's going to be a pain to install applications I'd rather run a distro with more tools geared towards Android app development like BBQ...

Mint supports .deb which is (from my observations) the most likely application packaging format on the planet. Distros with .deb support have access to a great deal of the software out there - trivially.

Most of the time, you can use GDebi or just sudo apt install <package_name> and be done with it. You will, of course, have to find the package to begin with.

On the other hand, a great deal of all the software you'll ever need is made available through the default repositories. It's possible (and wise) to stick with what's in the repositories until you're a bit more experienced and able to weigh the choices.

Remember...

It took you YEARS to learn how to use Windows with any degree of efficiency beyond point-and-click.
 
The sudo apt install command has been simple enough. I have decided I will go with Mint just for it's simplicity as an everyday OS I can use to develop android apps and learn both programming and Linux. I will also run Parrot Sec to learn more about other fun things and I'll keep my copy of Kali to use later when I have more skill and the right hardware.. (This all on Virtual Box, with Windows 11 as host because I have my games installed there... Maybe later I'll run a Windows VM with Linux host...)



I've learnt so much from everyone on this forum, I didn't have much of a clue about the direction to go in a few hours ago. I just want to say I am very grateful.
 
I've learnt so much from everyone on this forum, I didn't have much of a clue about the direction to go in a few hours ago. I just want to say I am very grateful.

Feel free to stick around. We're the nicest Linux forum online!

Stop by Member Introductions and leave a comment letting us know a bit about you, if you want.

Legit, we're pretty nice and our rules (while scant) ensure this.
 

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