Linux Privacy Manager is needed

jeethualex

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Just like the Task Manager that monitors all running processes is there a Privacy Manager that monitors processes consuming users data and metadata and maybe a button that keep users all data private. Users data privacy is very important today when the data consumption is exponentially growing and on the other end of the data pipe is an operating system responsible for users data privacy.
 


digitard

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I want to help but I don't understand what you are talking about. When I fail to ask the right question I rethink and rephrase.

Data are not consumed, they are taken away while you still having them.
 
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jeethualex

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Thanks for your reply.
The way the web browser is changing today its just a matter of time to see a AI version of it will be on every personal device. Some operating systems are already shipping out with inbuilt AI. If the underlying host system cannot guarantee the safety its users data from the application stack residing on top then what else can ? Data harvesting from the applications is happening in a very rapid pace today and very difficult to trace mostly through browsers and applications. We can see companies putting up online privacy dashboards that users manage what data they keep about the user. Just wondering if there is any way the os can provide a local privacy dashboard or privacy manager for the user to decide on the os level locally before the users data is gone somewhere else.
 

Condobloke

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The greatest "gatherer" of data/info is Google.

Changing your search engine to DuckDuckGo has an immediate and strong effect on any further data collection.
It is the most logical step for all of us to take.
 

Condobloke

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digitard

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Break down your security in three parts to have a place to start:

1) The place behind your internet access module (your local network and your devices etc)
2) The place in between your internet access module and your ISP
3) And the world beyond your ISP

For the #1 we are on faith here with some Linux distributions which are our best bet. For #2 and 3# have no faith.
Actually abandon all hope.

edit
Your OS is the only thing that has a chance to be in your side. Your hardware it's your enemy too despite that you paid for it. The expectations from the OS is to handle your rigged hardware in your favor and control what's passing through your internet access module both ways, in your favor, always assuming that the OS it's in your side.
 
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jeethualex

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Thanks all for your reply,

The first line of defence for your data is your own device or your own operating system. With increasingly AI introduced in intelligent browsers and intelligent crawlers bots what choice of privacy do I have ? The data pipe activities are invisible and cant track what is happening to data on my machine accessed by the intelligent applications. AI could be used to decrypt anything ? And AI is out of humans judistriction ? This is why I was thinking to shifting all personal activities to Linux. Earlier I used Linux only for programming and servers. Now I think it is time to switch my personal activities to maybe an offline Linux.

But still the question that remains is about one principle...

1. Is the operating system responsible for protecting the users data on the users device ? Then full control for application isolation and monitoring needed ? Even hardware rigging risks and isolation ?

2. Is the operating system responsible for protecting the users data on the any device ? Then should anyone own a device or an account ?
 
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jeethualex

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Thanks for your reply,

Its not just for the browser privacy. It is also for all the apps installed on the os. Privacy manager should ideally bring application awareness to the OS for watching the behaviour like user data flows in the installed applications and user data exiting the system.

Maybe a containerized application area and a containerized data area (Personal Space) and both communicating in a certain protocol. The task manager style ui where all security notification prompts accumulate in one place for the users to action recommendations.

The users should be able to traceroute their data using the tool. The motive be an installed application should not compromise the underlying os and its users data without the users knowledge.
 

jglen490

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Your best protection is first understanding that neither your computer, nor anyone else's computer relies on magic. The next is to keep your system updated, constantly, such that whenever the OS and apps are offered updates - take them. The last, and possibly most important, is know what you are responding to (emails, browsers), recognizing social engineering when you see it.

Or you can simply throw your computer in the trash.
 

Condobloke

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Privacy manager should ideally bring application awareness to the OS

So in other words, if a dodgy application is downloaded, the "privacy manager" should be aware of such dodginess and if the app is 'phoning home' etc, then a specifically set aside for the purpose should be available to inform the user, and make a recommendation for the user to follow.

That is an unnecessarily complicated way of further feather bedding the user.
It removes the onus from the user to do as @jglen490 has urged....keep your system updated, and very importantly know what you are responding too. Mouse clicks are fine, but there must be rational thought before that click takes place.

I think you are dreaming.....trying to make 'perfection' where none needs to exist.
 

KGIII

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Too add to this mess, the word privacy means different things to different people. Privacy is like security, meaning you must decide where on the spectrum you'd like to be.

For example, when something crashes on my computer and my OS wants to send a report, you can bet your ass that I hit the 'okay' button and submit that crash report. How else are they supposed to know it crashed, have the crash data, and fix errors in a timely manner?

Privacy? My name is David G. (which an astute digger would find linked to my very home address and my full name) and I'm okay with you knowing that. Hell, if you're in my neighborhood then you suck if you didn't at least stop to say hello! I have beer, wine, and delicious food!

I own a number of sites. I use many sites - and I use my "real" moniker with them. The name 'KGIII' has been online since before it was a world wide web.

Oh no! I browsed a porn site six months ago?!? Damned right, I did. And I liked it. Your AdSense sure did tie the two together and absolutely can make a profile of my behavior online. Oh no! Google knows that I checked out a porn site! What will the neighbors think?!?

I intentionally login to Bing so that they can better improve my search results. When I search, Bing knows that I want technical articles, scientific journal results, and tech specs for protocols. I consider it an acceptable bargain.

So, what's privacy to *you* and what's privacy to *me* are two different things. So, where do you set this magical bar that says what is and what isn't privacy? What data is acceptable for you to share? What benefits do you want to exchange for that privacy?

Here, you exchange privacy with a username so that you can participate. You create a clear public profile so that you can post questions and comments on this site. That's a privacy choice that you made.

Again, where's this line that you call privacy? It's a giant gray area that's a spectrum defined by the person making those choices. Trying to nail that down with a technical solution is an exercise in futility.

It's like trying to establish a hosts blocking file for everyone. Ain't gonna work. Tech can't solve that issue. It was never meant to.
 

MatsuShimizu

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Maybe a containerized application area and a containerized data area (Personal Space) and both communicating in a certain protocol. The task manager style ui where all security notification prompts accumulate in one place for the users to action recommendations.

There is an OS that can manage your privacy well, at least from the way you are describing in the above statement. Qubes OS. With Qubes OS, you can isolate different pieces of software as if they were installed on separate physical machines.
Qubes OS features: www.qubes-os.org/intro
Download: www.qubes-os.org
Video tour: www.qubes-os.org/video-tours
 
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digitard

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There is an OS that can manage your privacy well, at least from the way you are describing in the above statement. Qubes OS. With Qubes OS, you can isolate different pieces of software as if they were installed on separate physical machines.
Qubes OS features: www.qubes-os.org/intro
Download: www.qubes-os.org
Video tour: www.qubes-os.org/video-tours
So the only answer to the foggy terms ''security'' and ''privacy'' is ''isolation''. The cheap and smart way is Qubes OS, also room respecting. The more expensive and stupid way (my way since late 00's) is physically isolated machines for dedicated purpose. laptops are somewhat room respecting and are portable. Portability it's a critical security matter.
 

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jeethualex

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Thanks for your replies,

I was thinking of more basic like understanding first what data is going out of my machine and sign it. All data going out of my machine needs to be signed by me. Something like that ?
Can I achieve this with the tools today ?
 
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digitard

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I was thinking of more basic like understanding first what data is going out of my machine and sign it.
This is not basic, you don't sound like you can understand the code of a program. What you are asking is in the source code of the software you use... including the OS. And when you have make sure that, you have to go to the hardware, there is more software/hardware that you have to analyze, you know, take the CPU apart and make a virtual presentation of its structure etc

or just pull the plug
 

Vrai

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Just like the Task Manager that monitors all running processes is there a Privacy Manager that monitors processes consuming users data and metadata and maybe a button that keep users all data private.
Yes. There is.
It is called "the user".
 
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jeethualex

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Thanks all for your reply,

If you see now in the internet transactions is a one way signing contract. Means that as a server and client relationship of data exchange the server signs the data and the data pipe. The client os has no access or visibility to the data pipe.

I was thinking of a 2 way signing contract for data exchange with a signoff document protocol.

Means as a client as provider of my data I need access to the data pipe. I need full transparency of my data on the data pipe (traceroute my data). Means that I will be able to decrypt the data pipe with my local credentials. The data pipe becomes open both ways like a 2 way pipe. 2 way signed secure data exchange. Today its a one way secure exchange.

If a 2 way signing contract is not possible then the privacy manager should intercept the data before it enters the closed Https data pipes. Data needs to be screened before it enters the data pipe and signed (approved) locally ? The process could be simplified by user experience but the principle is a 2 way agreement and transparency. A 2 way real-time signed secure handshake network protocol ?
 
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