AWS moves to Fedora

dos2unix

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And, thanks to all of our users for returning the love — for the second year in a row, we’re the Best Linux Distro in Linux Unplugged “Tuxies”, and our friends over at Destination Linux have some really nice end-of-year compliments as well. Phoronix says “Fedora had a stellar 2021 and continued running at the forefront of Linux innovations.” Even OMG Ubuntu! got in on the action, naming us one of the top five distros of the year and noting “In short, if you want to ride the crest of the open source wave near the front, Fedora 35 is the one to choose.”

Amazon Web Services announced that the next version of AWS Linux will be based on Fedora Linux. This isn’t just validation of all the effort we put into the project, but it presents a great opportunity to grow our community. I’m looking forward to working with AWS engineers in Fedora in the coming year.
 


kc1di

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Thanks for the update - I haven't used Fedora in quite a while may have to give it another try. Brings back memories though use Redhat until it was forked to Fedora and RHEL. Back in the 90's
 

f33dm3bits

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What's the advantage of moving AWS to Fedora because each Fedora release is maintained and supported for 13 months. After that you have to upgrade to the next release, you run specific upgrade commands to switched to the next version, then you reboot and then you wait a long time for the upgrade process to complete. I don't see how this is an advantage for something like AWS, I could see them switching to CentOS Stream. Unless they aren't planning to upgrade but spin up a new system with the new Fedora version and then run a configuration over together with development pipeline.
 

gvisoc

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Unless they aren't planning to upgrade but spin up a new system with the new Fedora version and then run a configuration over together with development pipeline.
That is usually what you do for both VM and containers. But not only to upgrade; also for patching.
 

f33dm3bits

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That is usually what you do for both VM and containers. But not only to upgrade; also for patching.
I would find spinning up a new version of an OS once every 13 months quite often, also thinking of having to migrate the data. For containers it's a different story, but if their infrastructure is setup to deal with it that way than it makes sense. I work for a hospital and we have monthly patching cycles and we do upgrades to the next version of RHEL a year or so before the end of life date of the current running version.
 
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dos2unix

dos2unix

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Fedora because each Fedora release is maintained and supported for 13 months. After that you have to upgrade to the next release, you run specific upgrade commands to switched to the next version, then you reboot and then you wait a long time for the upgrade process to complete. I don't see how this is an advantage for something like AWS, I could see them switching to CentOS Stream.

Really it's closer to 18 months. But I think because CentOS went to stream, rather than tradtional upgrades is why a lot of people are staying away from CentOS these days. I used to work for one of the 5 largest banks in the US, and also one of the 4 largest cell phone providers in the US, we were big CentOS shops. Now everyone has gotten away from them. Basically it's a rolling release like Fedora anyway. upstream development... not as fully tested as mainstream Redhat.
The advantage with Fedora is you get compatibility with Redhat/CentOS but you get all the new stuff to go with it.
New kernels, new tools, new libraries. The place I work now is using Fedora in production. The whole redhat dev team
supports fedora, they innovate more than anyone else in the industry. The first with NIC teaming, built-in clustering,
who else has kickstart? They are built to be an exterprise OS. Redhat owns the server market by far.
I know Azure likes Ubuntu, but it doesn't come with the enterprise features.

We were using CentOS 7 with the 3.x kernel. But we were doing some things that required a 4.x kernel.
(Opening multiple connections on multiple ports on a single bus socket for example)
So we switched to Oracle which was basically redhat/CentOS with the UEK (4.x) kernel option.

Of course since then, CentOS 9 is out with a 5.x kernel, but that didn't help us two years ago.
We simply couldn't wait for the mainstrean enterprise vendors to catch up. Hence fedora. It has been working
for us great.
 

jpnilson

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From Centos


CentOS Stream​


Continuously delivered distro that tracks just ahead of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) development, positioned as a midstream between Fedora Linux and RHEL. For anyone interested in participating and collaborating in the RHEL ecosystem, CentOS Stream is your reliable platform for innovation.



The statement above is in line with my understanding fedora is the bleeding edge, Centos stream is like the candidate release for Red hat. I can't imagine using Fedora or Centos in a production environment without extensive testing. Of the two I would go with Centos and stay back a couple releases watching for others having problems. In production environments I have worked in Red Hat was used.
 

f33dm3bits

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Really it's closer to 18 months.
The advantage with Fedora is you get compatibility with Redhat/CentOS but you get all the new stuff to go with it.
New kernels, new tools, new libraries.
I thought it was 13 months because of the official Fedora life cycle page. I guess in depends on type of industry that you are maintaining the infrastructure for has effect on the what Linux distributions you use and how fast you are able to get everyone else to move from one technology to the next new technology and get approval from upper management and beyond to approve financing. I can see why people would want newer software faster, that's why Redhat Introduced AppStreams, but I have to agree that most of the developers I come across all want the latest and greatest versions.
 
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dos2unix

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Apparently there will be a "new" distro of Linux called Amazon Linux.
This is still basically Fedora, possibly re-branded. But it will have LTS support,
that isn't normally included with standard Fedora.

Right now, this is "cloud only". But rumours say. if successful, it could
turn into a full marketable consumer version.

Wouldn't that compete with Redhat's main server OS? ( RedHat Enterprise)
Ben Cotton says no. Some people want "tried and true" been around the block stable
OS's, that have been tested and run through the mill a thousand times.

But some people want the latest and greatest, with the latest kernels, drivers,
libraries and technologies. If there is a market for it, (we already have a dozen
fortune 100 companies interested) then it will become a reality.
 

wizardfromoz

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Interesting ... thanks for sharing.

I like the new avatar, take me to your leader. ;)

Wiz
 

Brickwizard

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No interest to me whatsoever, I put Amazon on the same folder as Microsoft, and Apple
 
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dos2unix

dos2unix

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No interest to me whatsoever, I put Amazon on the same folder as Microsoft, and Apple

Personally, I have to agree. But some of us, our jobs depend on the cloud.
Speaking of Microsoft, Azure runs on Ubuntu.

But even so, I wonder if it makes sense not to like a specific distro of Linux.. because "it's what they use".
 

forester

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@dos2unixm--"But even so, I wonder if it makes sense not to like a specific distro of Linux.. because "it's what they use".

It makes as much sense to me, personally, as to choose NOT to buy Marathon gasoline because of their lack of environmental concerns that affect us all.

I do not care much for anything Red Hat and dislike Anaconda, but respect your right to choose as you see fit { ". . . and will defend to Death your right to do so," as my deceased ex-father-in-law (a WWII vet) used to say!} even though I use the distantly-related RPM distro in PCLOS.

Best wishes!
 

gvisoc

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But even so, I wonder if it makes sense not to like a specific distro of Linux.. because "it's what they use".

It doesn't make any sense. If I chose not to use the things people, parties, companies, governments or things I don't like choose to use, I would end having to create my own universe.
 
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