ACPI error after installing Ubuntu 22.04

szovatilevente

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Can anyone help me please? I installed 22.04 on my Asus f506lh laptop.(without dual boot).After booting the system I got an error. Interesting cause the system works fine after booting.i have secure boot disabled.Can someone help me please ? thank you!
 

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Probably not the answer you expected.

ACPI errors are a common occurrence with Linux based on my experience using Linux.

ACPI errors are a regular occurrence on several of my Linux computers and never cause any problems on my computers.

I believe it's a bug in Linux and the Linux developers don't consider it to be any major concern.

If all is working fine I wouldn't worry.

 
Probably not the answer you expected.

ACPI errors are a common occurrence with Linux based on my experience using Linux.

ACPI errors are a regular occurrence on several of my Linux computers and never cause any problems on my computers.

I believe it's a bug in Linux and the Linux developers don't consider it to be any major concern.

If all is working fine I wouldn't worry.
I understand, thank you so much for the explication.
 
You can get rid of those ACPI Error messages by

1. Open '/etc/default/grub' in an editor with root access. In your case I believe Ubuntu uses gedit as it's text editor

Code:
sudo gedit /etc/default/grub

2. The line with 'GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT', add the loglevel=3 part. The original looks like

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash'

Change it to this:

Code:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash loglevel=3'

Then save the changes and close it, now open a terminal and run:

Code:
sudo update-grub

Reboot and see the results
 
Last edited by a moderator:
You can get rid of those ACPI Error messages by

1. Open '/etc/default/grub' in an editor with root access. In your case I believe Ubuntu uses gedit as it's text editor

Code:
sudo gedit /etc/default/grub

2. The line with 'GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT', add the loglevel=3 part. The original looks like

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash'

Change it to this:

Code:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash loglevel=3'

Then save the changes and close it, now open a terminal and run:

Code:
sudo update-grub

Reboot and see the results
I'm curious does this actually solve the errors or does it just hide the errors from being displayed.
 
Some BIOS/UEFI developers are just lazy and don't implement the entire ACPI specification into their BIOS/UEFI, or more worse, they implement it in the wrong way. When Linux tries to read some specific ACPI parameters, which don't exist, or are wrong, it fails and reports this kind of error. There is not a lot you can do about these errors, except try to upgrade the BIOS - my above post hides the errors it changes the log reporting so it is no longer seen but Loglevel 3, is identified by the KERN_ERR string, it’s the next in the scale. Messages adopting this level are often used to notify the user about non-critical errors. So adding loglevel=3 will not notify you of non-critical errors.
As far as I know there is no fix except maybe upgrading your BIOS or changing your BIOS from UEFI to Legacy which may help
 
Last edited by a moderator:
I read something similar to what you posted here.


I figured since you have Linux wisdom that I don't that you may have found a solution.

Most of my Linux computers are outdated and no bios updates for any improvements etc.

I can live with the ACPI errors along with a few other errors I seem to have

Just part of using outdated computers on my end.

Thanks.
 
Some BIOS/UEFI developers are just lazy and don't implement the entire ACPI specification into their BIOS/UEFI, or more worse, they implement it in the wrong way. When Linux tries to read some specific ACPI parameters, which don't exist, or are wrong, it fails and reports this kind of error. There is not a lot you can do about these errors, except try to upgrade the BIOS - my above post hides the errors it changes the log reporting so it is no longer seen but Loglevel 3, is identified by the KERN_ERR string, it’s the next in the scale. Messages adopting this level are often used to notify the user about non-critical errors. So adding loglevel=3 will not notify you of non-critical errors.
As far as I know there is no fix except maybe upgrading your BIOS or changing your BIOS from UEFI to Legacy which may help
Thank you!
 
You can get rid of those ACPI Error messages by

1. Open '/etc/default/grub' in an editor with root access. In your case I believe Ubuntu uses gedit as it's text editor

Code:
sudo gedit /etc/default/grub

2. The line with 'GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT', add the loglevel=3 part. The original looks like

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash'

Change it to this:

Code:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash loglevel=3'

Then save the changes and close it, now open a terminal and run:

Code:
sudo update-grub

Reboot and see the results
I will try and come back with news.thank you
 
You can get rid of those ACPI Error messages by

1. Open '/etc/default/grub' in an editor with root access. In your case I believe Ubuntu uses gedit as it's text editor

Code:
sudo gedit /etc/default/grub

2. The line with 'GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT', add the loglevel=3 part. The original looks like

GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash'

Change it to this:

Code:
GRUB_CMDLINE_LINUX_DEFAULT='quiet splash loglevel=3'

Then save the changes and close it, now open a terminal and run:

Code:
sudo update-grub

Reboot and see the results
it worked thank you so much
 
Can anyone help me please? I installed 22.04 on my Asus f506lh laptop.(without dual boot).After booting the system I got an error. Interesting cause the system works fine after booting.i have secure boot disabled.Can someone help me please ? thank you!
Some BIOS/UEFI developers are just lazy and don't implement the entire ACPI specification into their BIOS/UEFI, or more worse, they implement it in the wrong way. When Linux tries to read some specific ACPI parameters, which don't exist, or are wrong, it fails and reports this kind of error.

You may try a BIOS/UEFI update, but in most times you may just ignore these kind of "errors" and treat them more like a warning.

An example:

Mainboard-manufacturer XYZ creates 2 similar mainboards, but one has an additional Ethernet adapter:

  1. Mainboard-manufacturer XYZ creates a BIOS/UEFI for the mainboard with the additional Ethernet adapter and installs it on the mainboard with the additional Ethernet adapter.
  2. Mainboard-manufacturer XYZ is lazy and uses the same BIOS/UEFI image for the mainboard without the additional Ethernet adapter.
Some user named Mustafa Öncel installs Linux on a mainboard of XYZ which hasn't the additional Ethernet adapter. Linux kernel reads the ACPI-table of the BIOS/UEFI, this table says there is an additional Ethernet adapter, Linux tries to read the memory area, but fails, because there is no additional Ethernet adapter.

Note: If this error didn't occurred in the past, but now it does, it may be because you use a new Linux kernel, you changed your BIOS/UEFI or your hardware fails.
 
Some BIOS/UEFI developers are just lazy and don't implement the entire ACPI specification into their BIOS/UEFI, or more worse, they implement it in the wrong way. When Linux tries to read some specific ACPI parameters, which don't exist, or are wrong, it fails and reports this kind of error.

You may try a BIOS/UEFI update, but in most times you may just ignore these kind of "errors" and treat them more like a warning.

An example:

Mainboard-manufacturer XYZ creates 2 similar mainboards, but one has an additional Ethernet adapter:

  1. Mainboard-manufacturer XYZ creates a BIOS/UEFI for the mainboard with the additional Ethernet adapter and installs it on the mainboard with the additional Ethernet adapter.
  2. Mainboard-manufacturer XYZ is lazy and uses the same BIOS/UEFI image for the mainboard without the additional Ethernet adapter.
Some user named Mustafa Öncel installs Linux on a mainboard of XYZ which hasn't the additional Ethernet adapter. Linux kernel reads the ACPI-table of the BIOS/UEFI, this table says there is an additional Ethernet adapter, Linux tries to read the memory area, but fails, because there is no additional Ethernet adapter.

Note: If this error didn't occurred in the past, but now it does, it may be because you use a new Linux kernel, you changed your BIOS/UEFI or your hardware fails.


And how do you do it with SystemD boot?

I am asking because I was the one who whined, before op, like a mommy's boy, that Bartman quoted earlier on.
 
And how do you do it with SystemD boot?

I am asking because I was the one who whined, before op, like a mommy's boy, that Bartman quoted earlier on.

Wait, no... I found where you're quoted.

Whom exactly are you calling a mommy's boy? It looks like you're calling yourself that, but I figure I should clarify due to a reported post.
 
From kernel docs in the acpi dir:
Complain to your platform/BIOS vendor if you find a bug which is so severe
that a workaround is not accepted in the Linux kernel.
 
Wait, no... I found where you're quoted.

Whom exactly are you calling a mommy's boy? It looks like you're calling yourself that, but I figure I should clarify due to a reported post.
Myself of course!
I am from the balkans. Harsh language is employed on regular basis to emphasize the seriousness of any matter in question, but I digress.

Even if were to accuse someone of being that, would not the very notion of him complaining about it validate my accusation? It would make for an ironic paradox.

annyways, I did whine in an infantile fashion about a bug that didn't even stop my system from booting. I paniced more than the kernel did because I had data I didn't want lost.
 
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Just about every single BIOS/UEFI I've ever used allows me to disable ACPI.
In "VERY" rare care where it's caused a problem, I just disable it.
I have 7 computers here running Linux, I think I had to disable it on one.
 
I paniced more than the kernel did because I had data I didn't want lost.
Right after valuble data is entered and saved it's loaded onto usb flash drives x2.

The x2 is in case one usb flash drive fails.

Some data that is really important I save to a CD or DVD.
 
Just about every single BIOS/UEFI I've ever used allows me to disable ACPI.
In "VERY" rare care where it's caused a problem, I just disable it.
I have 7 computers here running Linux, I think I had to disable it on one.
I just ignore it and figured it's a Linux thing.

Linux seems to be a bastard OS and hardware support seems to get ignored by some manufactures.
 


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