Unable to boot

SansTabulaRasa

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Curious o_O... never mind, for now.

I am mindful you are on your phone, so some of the links I suggest for reading/acting upon you may need to read later, and maybe bookmark some for when you are up and running.

IMO our focus should be in 3 areas -

  1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid
  2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...
  3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)
WIZARD'S GLOSSARY

Clem - is Clement Lefebvre, born French, lives in Ireland - founder and CEO, Project Manager of Linux Mint

Devs - the Developers of our Linux Mint Distros

Distro - a distribution of GNU/Linux (Linux), such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Manjaro to name a few.

OS - operating system, can include MS Windows. Apple's Macintosh, GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Unix and others.

Families - are groups of Linux distros, that are based on the Family of the same name, There are five (5) Major Families, plus a bunch of Independents and Others. The five are (not in order of preference or importance)
  • Arch - eg Manjaro, Arcolinux, KaOS
  • Debian - eg Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Robolinux, Peppermint
  • RedHat aka RPM (Redhat Package Management system) - eg Fedora, centOS, Mageia, openSUSE
  • Gentoo - eg Sabayon, Calculate
  • Slackware - eg Puppy, Porteus
THE AREAS

1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid


I don't believe we established where you had gotten your downloaded .iso from. I would recommend from one of only 3 places -
  • The distro website itself - eg Linux Mint linuxmint.com
  • DistroWatch - distrowatch.com, who typically link to either of the distro website itself, or else
  • SourceForge or other reliable source, such as DistroWatch links to when you click to download
If you haven't got your 'Tricia' from there, let us know from where.

Before you downloaded, or imediately after, you should have checked the .iso 's hashsum.





At linuxmint.com when you choose to download your distro, you will go to a page where it says, in part



Long, eh?

You can check this in Windows, or in Macintosh, as well as Linux.

In Macintosh, go to its command line interface, establish the path to your .iso and enter eg

Code:
shasum -a 256 /path/to/file/linuxmint-19.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso
where for /path/to/file/ you substitute where it is located.

If you don't get the above figure, don't use the .iso.

GPG that Mint mentions is fine, but no need for now, I can explain more later.

2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...

You may want to consider putting on a 32-bit Mint instead - just for now.:)

If you choose that option, you would just need to adjust the iso name and the SHA256 to match to reflect that (above instructions).

32-bit gets a bad rep - it simply has a few less apps, because some apps require 64-bit architecture and some software devs are no longer writing for 32-bit. Likewise some Distros are no longer supplying.

Mint is, for now.

From your Boot Repair output (Pastebin) it appears you have an ideal environment for Linux 64-bit, that is - UEFI support, and GPT partitioning.

However (unless you can find a switch in BIOS to flip from Legacy to UEFI) you are for now stuck with MBR (Master Boot Record). You can install a 32-bit Mint under MBR on your computer, and just follow the installer directions to use the entire disk.

That will ensure that

3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)

... and anything else you want we can leave to Ron (lateR on) :D

See what you reckon, have a think, ask questions, Google stuff.

I know these timezone differences are a nuisance.

We have any number of people who can help - I would just ask them to consider the plan I have suggested. Tweaking is fine.

BTW - if you choose to re-burn the .iso to the stick

1. Format to FAT32 (can be used on all OSes)
2. Try Etcher as a burning solution, or UnetBootin

https://www.balena.io/etcher/

https://unetbootin.github.io/

... both cover Linux Windows and Mac.

Cheers

Wiz
Appreciate you digging through that pastebin, I can only assume it was quite the endeavor.

Wasn't able to execute step 2 after torrenting 64 bit Mint Tricia/19.3 from the site direct, using the Mac command line to verify the iso and flashing with Balena etcher onto a clean reformatted FAT32 USB like you recommended.

When I attempted to boot the computer in UEFI, I get an error message in the upper left-hand pre-boot screen:

Failed to open \EFI\BOOT\mmx64.efi - Not Found
Failed to load image \EFI\BOOT\mmx64.efi: Not Found
Failed to start MokManager: Not Found
Something has gone seriously wrong: import_mok_state() failed
:Not Found

This message only popped up when I had the flashed USB inserted, and I could not access the BIOS or the boot menu while it was inserted.

I threw the error message in my browser and found this forum thread:
https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=284124

Turns out it was a peculiarity of the Acer BIOS that prevented it from booting Mint in secure mode. I then looked at these articles:

I was able to to disable secure boot and whitelist the Linux boot file needed to get Mint to boot. For now I can boot Mint without issue and use my computer as Lefebvre intended.

I appreciate all the help you've all given me, I hope this forum thread will help out other folks with similar issues! :)
 


wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Credits
2,927
Legend ;)

I had seen those errors (UEFI) only recently, also the first of your 2 links (thanks for sharing, I will bookmark the 2nd).

It seems some of the Acers, and some Lenovos, face this problem.

One of the first things you should do with your "new baby" is christen it with a firewall (not enabled by default).

In Terminal (or shortcut Ctrl-Alt-t), type and enter

Code:
sudo ufw enable
This will activate the Uncomplicated Fire Wall at a basic level of protection, in realtime, and a small script will run to do so every reboot.

Cheers

Enjoy your Linux and

Avagudweegend

Wizard
 

Vrai

Well-Known Member
Credits
1,671
1. It is an Acer Aspire E5-575
2. InsydeH20 Setup Utility Rev. 5.0 & System BIOS Version 1.27
3. Total Memory 4096 MB
Sorry I didn't notice this earlier :(
I have the same Acer E5-575 laptop and experienced a similar issue a few years ago when I first installed Linux on it. Had to do some searching and monkeying around under the hood in order to get Linux to boot. I don't remember the "Insyde" utility though :\
Ever since I got Linux installed it has been one of the best Linux laptops I have ever used!
 

LinuxSupreme6969

New Member
Credits
0
To preface, I'm fairly new to playing with tech. I installed Linux mint onto an acer laptop and deleted the pre-installed windows 10 OS off the drive after backing up my files. I'm guessing I deleted some key boot files when messing with the hard drive partitions, since after installing and restarting I got a prompt saying there wasn't a bootable device.
Attempting to reinstall without touching partition options didn't help, and running Boot Repair with the recommended option twice didn't work either. Boot repair instructed me to boot it through UEFI instead of Legacy, but I can't get it to run using UEFI. Any help would be appreciated.

Here's a pastebin boot repair provided if it helps: http://paste.ubuntu.com/p/DpTd4q3ySn/
To boot the Windows 10 up or the Linux..? The linux is fairly easy, you have to hold a few selected keys down as you proceed and choose the Linux and not the "C://Windows" drive. If you cannot reboot your WINDOWS then you should try the trunk reset. The trunk reset deletes all files, then restores them, it's a process that luckily saved me back then for my stupidity with deleting Windows whilst playing with Mint myself, except I was using a Live USB Drive and thought it would not delete my Windows drive. Live and learn.
 

Vicktoria

Active Member
Credits
969
Curious o_O... never mind, for now.

I am mindful you are on your phone, so some of the links I suggest for reading/acting upon you may need to read later, and maybe bookmark some for when you are up and running.

IMO our focus should be in 3 areas -

  1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid
  2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...
  3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)
WIZARD'S GLOSSARY

Clem - is Clement Lefebvre, born French, lives in Ireland - founder and CEO, Project Manager of Linux Mint

Devs - the Developers of our Linux Mint Distros

Distro - a distribution of GNU/Linux (Linux), such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Manjaro to name a few.

OS - operating system, can include MS Windows. Apple's Macintosh, GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Unix and others.

Families - are groups of Linux distros, that are based on the Family of the same name, There are five (5) Major Families, plus a bunch of Independents and Others. The five are (not in order of preference or importance)
  • Arch - eg Manjaro, Arcolinux, KaOS
  • Debian - eg Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Robolinux, Peppermint
  • RedHat aka RPM (Redhat Package Management system) - eg Fedora, centOS, Mageia, openSUSE
  • Gentoo - eg Sabayon, Calculate
  • Slackware - eg Puppy, Porteus
THE AREAS

1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid


I don't believe we established where you had gotten your downloaded .iso from. I would recommend from one of only 3 places -
  • The distro website itself - eg Linux Mint linuxmint.com
  • DistroWatch - distrowatch.com, who typically link to either of the distro website itself, or else
  • SourceForge or other reliable source, such as DistroWatch links to when you click to download
If you haven't got your 'Tricia' from there, let us know from where.

Before you downloaded, or imediately after, you should have checked the .iso 's hashsum.





At linuxmint.com when you choose to download your distro, you will go to a page where it says, in part



Long, eh?

You can check this in Windows, or in Macintosh, as well as Linux.

In Macintosh, go to its command line interface, establish the path to your .iso and enter eg

Code:
shasum -a 256 /path/to/file/linuxmint-19.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso
where for /path/to/file/ you substitute where it is located.

If you don't get the above figure, don't use the .iso.

GPG that Mint mentions is fine, but no need for now, I can explain more later.

2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...

You may want to consider putting on a 32-bit Mint instead - just for now.:)

If you choose that option, you would just need to adjust the iso name and the SHA256 to match to reflect that (above instructions).

32-bit gets a bad rep - it simply has a few less apps, because some apps require 64-bit architecture and some software devs are no longer writing for 32-bit. Likewise some Distros are no longer supplying.

Mint is, for now.

From your Boot Repair output (Pastebin) it appears you have an ideal environment for Linux 64-bit, that is - UEFI support, and GPT partitioning.

However (unless you can find a switch in BIOS to flip from Legacy to UEFI) you are for now stuck with MBR (Master Boot Record). You can install a 32-bit Mint under MBR on your computer, and just follow the installer directions to use the entire disk.

That will ensure that

3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)

... and anything else you want we can leave to Ron (lateR on) :D

See what you reckon, have a think, ask questions, Google stuff.

I know these timezone differences are a nuisance.

We have any number of people who can help - I would just ask them to consider the plan I have suggested. Tweaking is fine.

BTW - if you choose to re-burn the .iso to the stick

1. Format to FAT32 (can be used on all OSes)
2. Try Etcher as a burning solution, or UnetBootin

https://www.balena.io/etcher/

https://unetbootin.github.io/

... both cover Linux Windows and Mac.

Cheers

Wiz
Curious o_O... never mind, for now.

I am mindful you are on your phone, so some of the links I suggest for reading/acting upon you may need to read later, and maybe bookmark some for when you are up and running.

IMO our focus should be in 3 areas -

  1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid
  2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...
  3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)
WIZARD'S GLOSSARY

Clem - is Clement Lefebvre, born French, lives in Ireland - founder and CEO, Project Manager of Linux Mint

Devs - the Developers of our Linux Mint Distros

Distro - a distribution of GNU/Linux (Linux), such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Manjaro to name a few.

OS - operating system, can include MS Windows. Apple's Macintosh, GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Unix and others.

Families - are groups of Linux distros, that are based on the Family of the same name, There are five (5) Major Families, plus a bunch of Independents and Others. The five are (not in order of preference or importance)
  • Arch - eg Manjaro, Arcolinux, KaOS
  • Debian - eg Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Robolinux, Peppermint
  • RedHat aka RPM (Redhat Package Management system) - eg Fedora, centOS, Mageia, openSUSE
  • Gentoo - eg Sabayon, Calculate
  • Slackware - eg Puppy, Porteus
THE AREAS

1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid


I don't believe we established where you had gotten your downloaded .iso from. I would recommend from one of only 3 places -
  • The distro website itself - eg Linux Mint linuxmint.com
  • DistroWatch - distrowatch.com, who typically link to either of the distro website itself, or else
  • SourceForge or other reliable source, such as DistroWatch links to when you click to download
If you haven't got your 'Tricia' from there, let us know from where.

Before you downloaded, or imediately after, you should have checked the .iso 's hashsum.





At linuxmint.com when you choose to download your distro, you will go to a page where it says, in part



Long, eh?

You can check this in Windows, or in Macintosh, as well as Linux.

In Macintosh, go to its command line interface, establish the path to your .iso and enter eg

Code:
shasum -a 256 /path/to/file/linuxmint-19.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso
where for /path/to/file/ you substitute where it is located.

If you don't get the above figure, don't use the .iso.

GPG that Mint mentions is fine, but no need for now, I can explain more later.

2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...

You may want to consider putting on a 32-bit Mint instead - just for now.:)

If you choose that option, you would just need to adjust the iso name and the SHA256 to match to reflect that (above instructions).

32-bit gets a bad rep - it simply has a few less apps, because some apps require 64-bit architecture and some software devs are no longer writing for 32-bit. Likewise some Distros are no longer supplying.

Mint is, for now.

From your Boot Repair output (Pastebin) it appears you have an ideal environment for Linux 64-bit, that is - UEFI support, and GPT partitioning.

However (unless you can find a switch in BIOS to flip from Legacy to UEFI) you are for now stuck with MBR (Master Boot Record). You can install a 32-bit Mint under MBR on your computer, and just follow the installer directions to use the entire disk.

That will ensure that

3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)

... and anything else you want we can leave to Ron (lateR on) :D

See what you reckon, have a think, ask questions, Google stuff.

I know these timezone differences are a nuisance.

We have any number of people who can help - I would just ask them to consider the plan I have suggested. Tweaking is fine.

BTW - if you choose to re-burn the .iso to the stick

1. Format to FAT32 (can be used on all OSes)
2. Try Etcher as a burning solution, or UnetBootin

https://www.balena.io/etcher/

https://unetbootin.github.io/

... both cover Linux Windows and Mac.

Cheers

Wiz
Dear Wizard, I've been working on a duel boot issue with Mint and Windows 7 on my Fujitsu 64bit, Intel core 500GB, with 4 partitions Sys nfts, Windows nfts, Linux ext4, swap. It has been three weeks and I still get message 'no root files' in the Mint installer, selecting 'something else', and trying install on Linux partition. That Mint download did pass the checksum verification. I am at a friends to access hispeed, as dial-up is my only option at home, and I'm sure they'd like me to go home soon. The first Mint install attempt crashed. I saw a quick flash of the message speaking about 'no grub' as that happened. This caused me to be unable to access windows. Boot repair got me back on windows, which I need to run a critical robust windows program, until I get Wine or virtual box on the hard drive. It occurs to me Mint just won't work, since no one has mentioned the 'no root files' issue and we still do not have duel boot. Soooo, I decided to try another distro, and I believe you recommended POP, in maybe your partitions video. So I have the iso, and Etcher to make a bootable usb. My question is how do I verify the POP iso, [I have the numbers from the site. I downloaded it from the POP website.]. and/or can you figure out how to get Mint downloaded to the hardrive partition. I'm a noobe, and need step by step instructions. Thanks so much for your efforts...and how's the shoulder doing?
 

wizardfromoz

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Staff member
Gold Supporter
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g'day again viktoria - you may have seen my post to you elsewhere, so the same applies here :)

off-topic and unrelated

try to stick with the threads you have authored and we will try to help you get running.

i note that you have now made the acquaintance of both etcher and gtkhash, so that is good.

wizard
 


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