Unable to boot

SansTabulaRasa

New Member
To preface, I'm fairly new to playing with tech. I installed Linux mint onto an acer laptop and deleted the pre-installed windows 10 OS off the drive after backing up my files. I'm guessing I deleted some key boot files when messing with the hard drive partitions, since after installing and restarting I got a prompt saying there wasn't a bootable device.
Attempting to reinstall without touching partition options didn't help, and running Boot Repair with the recommended option twice didn't work either. Boot repair instructed me to boot it through UEFI instead of Legacy, but I can't get it to run using UEFI. Any help would be appreciated.

Here's a pastebin boot repair provided if it helps: http://paste.ubuntu.com/p/DpTd4q3ySn/
 


Condobloke

Well-Known Member
G'day SansTabulaRasa, and Welcome to linux.org

I will summon the Wizard for you. He usually handles stuff like this with ease.

@wizardfromoz
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Yeah thanks Brian o_O

G'day Without a Clean Slate? and welcome to linux.org :)

1. Have you been into the UEFI side of your BIOS previously? Have you set a password there?

2. How did you delete Windows 10, and do you have a way of restoring that (USB stick or disk)?

3. What medium are you using currently to communicate with us if the Acer is not working?

I'll have more questions.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

Daviboy

Member
It looks like to me that you ran Lime and installed. all you need to do is reboot on laptop hold the Bios key on boot-up. Usually F12 for a laptop. for a PC OZ is right, you have to set your Bios to read the USB.

The usb is coming up with that message because to OP on your system, even if it's Lime, can't read the usb.

Let me know how you get on....

Davi
 

SansTabulaRasa

New Member
Yeah thanks Brian o_O

G'day Without a Clean Slate? and welcome to linux.org :)

1. Have you been into the UEFI side of your BIOS previously? Have you set a password there?

2. How did you delete Windows 10, and do you have a way of restoring that (USB stick or disk)?

3. What medium are you using currently to communicate with us if the Acer is not working?

I'll have more questions.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
1. I used the UEFI side of my BIOS to install linux mint from a USB. I didn't set a password in the BIOS, though I did set a password in the mint installer to encrypt the hard drive, don't know if that's related.

2. I used the mint installer to wipe the hard drive including Windows. I don't have a way to restore Windows prepared.

3. I'm communicating on mobile now, though I can also borrow a friend's Mac to communicate here.

Thank you for your help
 

Daviboy

Member
Hi

Look at Poorguys article here ;-)

 

SansTabulaRasa

New Member
Hi

Look at Poorguys article here ;-)

I'm not sure I understand. My Acer is 64bit and ran on Windows 10 pre-installed. I'm certain I flashed linux mint to a USB properly, otherwise I followed the instructions given in the mint installer. Also, who's Poorguys? Did you mean to link something else?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
@SansTabulaRasa I dont blame you for being confused.
@poorguy I see your name...but I see no sign of you, mate !!

Sanstabularosa.....possibly a better distro to try might be Linux Lite

I am providing a link
HERE which offers all sorts on information.

A link to download from HERE Please be aware that Linux lite 32 bit is only supported until sometime in 2021

Hopefully you can update to a 64 bit machine in that time

There are other 32 bit distros.......but not too many.......you are seriously limited
 

Daviboy

Member
@Condobloke I know the selection isn't there as yet, but there are new Distros being released weekly as Linux becomes more popular. Linux lite are just empty shells without the added apps. The lowest shell I have seen is around 2Mb but on average Distros for Linux come to 2Mb - 16Mb I haven't really seen any bigger except windows weighing in at 50Mb. So there is a wide range of light Distros and more to choose from. No wonder it's getting confusing out there.

I have turned in to a right Distro slut, changing Distro weekly (Which is good) as I get the feel and flavour of the new Diastro of the week! LOL
 

captain-sensible

Active Member
@Condobloke I know the selection isn't there as yet, but there are new Distros being released weekly as Linux becomes more popular. Linux lite are just empty shells without the added apps. The lowest shell I have seen is around 2Mb but on average Distros for Linux come to 2Mb - 16Mb I haven't really seen any bigger except windows weighing in at 50Mb. So there is a wide range of light Distros and more to choose from. No wonder it's getting confusing out there.

I have turned in to a right Distro slut, changing Distro weekly (Which is good) as I get the feel and flavour of the new Diastro of the week! LOL
they do say there is a time line :

Windows -> puppy or other -> ubuntu -> slackware or arch . The one flaw in the whole Linux universe is that ego's or lack of business acumen prevent talent coalescing around one distro adding their talent , providing support for users(ok rehat is an exception) and developing a business model. Microsoft on the other hand doesn't have loads of flavors but simply one distro, the financial model is Ok and they put all efforts behind it.
 

Vrai

Well-Known Member
To preface, I'm fairly new to playing with tech. I installed Linux mint onto an acer laptop and deleted the pre-installed windows 10 OS off the drive after backing up my files. I'm guessing I deleted some key boot files when messing with the hard drive partitions, since after installing and restarting I got a prompt saying there wasn't a bootable device.
Attempting to reinstall without touching partition options didn't help, and running Boot Repair with the recommended option twice didn't work either. Boot repair instructed me to boot it through UEFI instead of Legacy, but I can't get it to run using UEFI. Any help would be appreciated.

Here's a pastebin boot repair provided if it helps: http://paste.ubuntu.com/p/DpTd4q3ySn/
I'm no "boot" expert but after reading the 'boot repair pastebin' and the posts here it appears to me that there is no boot loader installed.
Code:
==================== Boot Info Summary: ====================

 => No boot loader is installed in the MBR of /dev/sda.
 => ISOhybrid (Syslinux 4.05 and higher) is installed in the MBR of /dev/sdb.

=================== Suggested repair
The default repair of the Boot-Repair utility would reinstall the grub-efi-amd64-signed of sda2, using the following options:        sda1/boot/efi,
Additional repair would be performed: unhide-bootmenu-10s    use-standard-efi-file
It also appears that the PC is set to BIOS mode but should be set to UEFI mode.
Code:
=================== Blockers in case of suggested repair
The current session is in Legacy mode. Please reboot the computer, and use this software in an EFI session. This will enable this feature. For example, use a live-USB of Boot-Repair-Disk-64bit (www.sourceforge.net/p/boot-repair-cd), after making sure your BIOS is set up to boot USB in EFI mode.


=================== Advice in case of suggested repair
The boot of your PC is in Legacy mode. You may want to retry after changing it to EFI mode.
Alternatively, you may want to retry after deactivating the [Separate /boot/efi partition:] option.
Do you want to continue?

=================== Final advice in case of suggested repair
Please do not forget to make your BIOS boot on sda1/efi/.../grub*.efi file!

=================== User settings
The settings chosen by the user will not act on the boot.
Have you tried to set your PC to UEFI mode? Do that then reinstall the operating system.

Also, after reinstalling, when you restart the machine, be sure to remove the "Live" usb you used to install from.

It will help others to help you if you provide the exact make and model of your computer, including a few hardware specs'
 

Daviboy

Member
@captain-sensible - I have been working on Distros to suit, that is building my own shells and tailoring them to fit a profession. Shop Keeper, Plumber, Electrician, Taxi Driver etc... So that professionals get the tools/apps to work with, without being crowded with apps they would never use. Hence keeping the Disto small, and simple.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Poorguys is a user on here, he wrote an article about booting off a flash. Click on link.
That link is dead, for now, that may or may not change (the Thread is still active).

The link referred to by @Daviboy was one of three provided by @poorguy - the first one, in fact.

Its direct link is here

https://www.linux.org/threads/how-to-try-linux-mint-on-your-windows-pc.20993/

and is well worth a read.

However it was not authored by @poorguy but by Brian @Condobloke , whom you have already "met" in this Thread (lovable dog avatar).

Folks please note

Things have gotten confused here, with much well-intentioned input working from false assumptions, perhaps.

I would like to get us back on track to help the OP (Original Poster, that’s you, SansTabulaRasa) get a good outcome.

@SansTabulaRasa can you please tell us the following:

1. Computer Brand, name, model number
2. Go into your BIOS and tell us the BIOS utility – Name, Version, Revision, may also have a date eg

InsydeH20 Setup Utility Rev 3.7 (date perhaps) and System BIOS Version 1-60

This may not be at your entry point but on a Main page. Also from there

3. Total Memory Size 8192 MB (substitute your own figure)

I will start putting together a package which will clarify and hopefully assist.

Thanks all :)

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

SansTabulaRasa

New Member
That link is dead, for now, that may or may not change (the Thread is still active).

The link referred to by @Daviboy was one of three provided by @poorguy - the first one, in fact.

Its direct link is here

https://www.linux.org/threads/how-to-try-linux-mint-on-your-windows-pc.20993/

and is well worth a read.

However it was not authored by @poorguy but by Brian @Condobloke , whom you have already "met" in this Thread (lovable dog avatar).

Folks please note

Things have gotten confused here, with much well-intentioned input working from false assumptions, perhaps.

I would like to get us back on track to help the OP (Original Poster, that’s you, SansTabulaRasa) get a good outcome.

@SansTabulaRasa can you please tell us the following:

1. Computer Brand, name, model number
2. Go into your BIOS and tell us the BIOS utility – Name, Version, Revision, may also have a date eg

InsydeH20 Setup Utility Rev 3.7 (date perhaps) and System BIOS Version 1-60

This may not be at your entry point but on a Main page. Also from there

3. Total Memory Size 8192 MB (substitute your own figure)

I will start putting together a package which will clarify and hopefully assist.

Thanks all :)

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
1. It is an Acer Aspire E5-575
2. InsydeH20 Setup Utility Rev. 5.0 & System BIOS Version 1.27
3. Total Memory 4096 MB

Thank you for the assistance :)
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Cheers Mate for the info - guessed well with the Insyde, eh?

4 GB RAM, not big, but way big enough that you do not need to be using lightweight Linuxes.

Do you know if it is Mint Cinnamon or Mint MATE or Xfce? (I may have missed that).

In a nutshell -

1.Your USB stick, or the burn of the .iso to it, is defective
2. You need to be able to get UEFI running in the BIOS if you are going to use that .iso under UEFI conditions.

I will explain in more detail, and reference the Pastebin report as soon as I get a chance.

In the meantime, take a bit of a read (maybe on another computer if hard on the phone) of this

https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2406697

and see the similarities in the Pastebin report to your circumstances.

The other fellow was using Ubuntu and on MBR (dos) instead of UEFI, but otherwise they are almost identical.

Gotta go for now

Wizard
 

SansTabulaRasa

New Member
Cheers Mate for the info - guessed well with the Insyde, eh?

4 GB RAM, not big, but way big enough that you do not need to be using lightweight Linuxes.

Do you know if it is Mint Cinnamon or Mint MATE or Xfce? (I may have missed that).

In a nutshell -

1.Your USB stick, or the burn of the .iso to it, is defective
2. You need to be able to get UEFI running in the BIOS if you are going to use that .iso under UEFI conditions.

I will explain in more detail, and reference the Pastebin report as soon as I get a chance.

In the meantime, take a bit of a read (maybe on another computer if hard on the phone) of this

https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2406697

and see the similarities in the Pastebin report to your circumstances.

The other fellow was using Ubuntu and on MBR (dos) instead of UEFI, but otherwise they are almost identical.

Gotta go for now

Wizard
It's Mint Cinnamon, I hope that is helpful. I will look into it as you recommended, thanks again for the assist!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
I am doing a bit of brainstorming over the Pastebin report, this part to do with your USB stick (my highlighting

Drive: sdb _____________________________________________________________________
Disk /dev/sdb: 3.8 GiB, 4009754624 bytes, 7831552 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos

Partition Boot Start Sector End Sector # of Sectors Id System

/dev/sdb1 * 0 1,449,983 1,449,984 17 Hidden NTFS / HPFS
The part in red is typically associated with a Windows Recovery partition - has this stick been used for Windows Recovery before?

I have more questions, but I will structure them better soon. :)

Wiz
 

SansTabulaRasa

New Member
I am doing a bit of brainstorming over the Pastebin report, this part to do with your USB stick (my highlighting



The part in red is typically associated with a Windows Recovery partition - has this stick been used for Windows Recovery before?

I have more questions, but I will structure them better soon. :)

Wiz
No, I have not used this USB for Windows Recovery; it was a new stick fresh out of the packaging.

I appreciate the work you're putting in on my behalf :)
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Curious o_O... never mind, for now.

I am mindful you are on your phone, so some of the links I suggest for reading/acting upon you may need to read later, and maybe bookmark some for when you are up and running.

IMO our focus should be in 3 areas -

  1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid
  2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...
  3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)
WIZARD'S GLOSSARY

Clem - is Clement Lefebvre, born French, lives in Ireland - founder and CEO, Project Manager of Linux Mint

Devs - the Developers of our Linux Mint Distros

Distro - a distribution of GNU/Linux (Linux), such as Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Manjaro to name a few.

OS - operating system, can include MS Windows. Apple's Macintosh, GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Unix and others.

Families - are groups of Linux distros, that are based on the Family of the same name, There are five (5) Major Families, plus a bunch of Independents and Others. The five are (not in order of preference or importance)
  • Arch - eg Manjaro, Arcolinux, KaOS
  • Debian - eg Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Robolinux, Peppermint
  • RedHat aka RPM (Redhat Package Management system) - eg Fedora, centOS, Mageia, openSUSE
  • Gentoo - eg Sabayon, Calculate
  • Slackware - eg Puppy, Porteus
THE AREAS

1. Establishing that what is on your USB stick is valid


I don't believe we established where you had gotten your downloaded .iso from. I would recommend from one of only 3 places -
  • The distro website itself - eg Linux Mint linuxmint.com
  • DistroWatch - distrowatch.com, who typically link to either of the distro website itself, or else
  • SourceForge or other reliable source, such as DistroWatch links to when you click to download
If you haven't got your 'Tricia' from there, let us know from where.

Before you downloaded, or imediately after, you should have checked the .iso 's hashsum.

A checksum is a digit which serves as a sum of correct digits in data, which can be used later to detect errors in the data during storage or transmission. MD5 (Message Digest 5) sums can be used as a checksum to verify files or strings in a Linux file system.
A checksum (also sometimes referred to as a hash) is an alphanumeric value that uniquely represents the contents of a file. Checksums are often used to verify the integrity of files downloaded from an external source, such as an installation file. You can also use checksums to verify the integrity of your own files.
At linuxmint.com when you choose to download your distro, you will go to a page where it says, in part

Don't forget to verify your ISO

... and if you click that you eventually get that for your distro, the SHA256sum is

7a9e54212433c8547edfd789ac933c91a9bde1a61196fa7977c5357a2c40292d
Long, eh?

You can check this in Windows, or in Macintosh, as well as Linux.

In Macintosh, go to its command line interface, establish the path to your .iso and enter eg

Code:
shasum -a 256 /path/to/file/linuxmint-19.3-cinnamon-64bit.iso
where for /path/to/file/ you substitute where it is located.

If you don't get the above figure, don't use the .iso.

GPG that Mint mentions is fine, but no need for now, I can explain more later.

2. Once 1. is established, getting a Linux installed (Linux Mint 19.3 'Tricia' Cinnamon or other, regardless) so that...

You may want to consider putting on a 32-bit Mint instead - just for now.:)

If you choose that option, you would just need to adjust the iso name and the SHA256 to match to reflect that (above instructions).

32-bit gets a bad rep - it simply has a few less apps, because some apps require 64-bit architecture and some software devs are no longer writing for 32-bit. Likewise some Distros are no longer supplying.

Mint is, for now.

From your Boot Repair output (Pastebin) it appears you have an ideal environment for Linux 64-bit, that is - UEFI support, and GPT partitioning.

However (unless you can find a switch in BIOS to flip from Legacy to UEFI) you are for now stuck with MBR (Master Boot Record). You can install a 32-bit Mint under MBR on your computer, and just follow the installer directions to use the entire disk.

That will ensure that

3. Your computer has an OS (operating system)

... and anything else you want we can leave to Ron (lateR on) :D

See what you reckon, have a think, ask questions, Google stuff.

I know these timezone differences are a nuisance.

We have any number of people who can help - I would just ask them to consider the plan I have suggested. Tweaking is fine.

BTW - if you choose to re-burn the .iso to the stick

1. Format to FAT32 (can be used on all OSes)
2. Try Etcher as a burning solution, or UnetBootin

https://www.balena.io/etcher/

https://unetbootin.github.io/

... both cover Linux Windows and Mac.

Cheers

Wiz
 



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