Redhat and Fedora will stop shipping LibreOffice.

kc1di

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The current status is that LibreOffice RPMs are “orphaned” (a term meaning they no longer have an active maintainer), with Red Hat (the hitherto existing maintainer) stepping away from the role almost entirely. Unless by some miracle someone else steps up at Redhat - There’s an official LibreOffice Flatpak build. This is available to Fedora and RHEL (and other Linux) users

See here - https://www.omglinux.com/red-hat-stop-packaging-libreoffice/
 

wendy-lebaron

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It's sensible for RHEL's side. Just install Libreoffice as AppImage or Flatpak. What sucks about that is that the user has to remember and has to take it upon himself/herself to upgrade. What is good is the user could upgrade when and if he/she chooses. If a later edition breaks something, or if functionality is too different and/or not desireable then he/she could always go back to the last edition that worked, and more easily than with the usual package managers.

Otherwise it allows the user to embrace an alternative like Calligra or OnlyOffice.

Meanwhile Debian GNOME "Bookworm" ties dependencies to Libreoffice so it almost cannot be uninstalled. So Libreoffice "ready to be updated" isn't going away anytime soon from the homeland.
 

f33dm3bits

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It's sensible for RHEL's side. Just install Libreoffice as AppImage or Flatpak. What sucks about that is that the user has to remember and has to take it upon himself/herself to upgrade.
With Fedora the rpms and the flatpaks can be updated through the software manager and if you update using the command-line you can just create an alias that updates both the rpm's using dnf and the flatpaks using the flatpak command. After having read that discussion from the Fedora list, I'm not sure what the effects might be for the future of Fedora
 

wendy-lebaron

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A bit off-topic, and some of you think I bash Libreoffice every opportunity I get but it's not true.

No I'm not glad with this development, but this is only RPM-land, right? Maybe RHEL and its descendants are looking to reduce the ISO a little bit... being facetious about the fact AlmaLinux provide "live media" ISO's for KDE Plasma and XFCE as well as GNOME much smaller than eg. the GNOME-only install-only Rocky Linux.


Nearly 10 years ago I had an experience which caused me to desire not to help anybody with anything about computers. I had a copy of OpenOffice-dot-org v4 (predecessor of Libreoffice) which was "by Apache" at the time, to introduce to a family member. I spent about half an hour teaching them how to use the Writer, how to use the auto-format, showing them that the auto-format worked in other programs of the suite such as the spreadsheet, and more. Then I discovered they weren't very enthused about it. They weren't even overly excited the program was being offered for free download. It's because they had a copy of M$ Office somewhere, and I'm not saying anything else about it. Got mad watching them using the word processor and doing almost everything from the toolbar. That anger turned into helplessness and I wanted to disappear into a hole for even introducing any program to this family member. Of course, back then OpenOffice/Libreoffice wasn't quite as featured as it is now.

Probably for that reason M$ went with the subscription model, with "pay for use online". Maybe if I tried again now to teach anybody about a free office suite I would get much better attention and interest.
 

MikeWalsh

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Just install Libreoffice as AppImage or Flatpak. What sucks about that is that the user has to remember and has to take it upon himself/herself to upgrade.

Er....why??

Yes, I know I'm highly atypical compared to most folks. I've been using the AppImage of LibreOffice 7.0.4 for quite some time now. It's stable, it does what I want; where's the point in "upgrading"? I'm really NOT that obsessed with having the very latest gizmo, OR compatibility with whatever document variant M$ has decreed is the current "flavour of the month".....I haven't run Windows for around a decade, nor do I interact with Windows users.

I'll probably stick with it for quite a while to come. It's built-in to one of my 'portable-app' packages anyway, so everything is self-contained in any case...

(shrug)

Nearly 10 years ago I had an experience which caused me to desire not to help anybody with anything about computers.

I learnt that lesson almost a quarter of a century ago, at the tail-end of the 90s. Don't ever "volunteer" to help anybody "improve" the way they do stuff on their PC unless they first mention it themselves.....and even then, ONLY if they express an interest in changing the way they do things, or wanting to try something different.


Mike. ;)
 
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wizardfromoz

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Flatpaks are easy to update, albeit manually - the others not so easy.

With flatpaks, you can run

Code:
flatpak update

and it will list all outdated flatpaks, and by choosing Y update them.

If you only want to update one flatpack, then choose

n

and instead enter

Code:
flatpak update package_name

Cheers

Wizard
 

MikeWalsh

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Otherwise it allows the user to embrace an alternative like Calligra or OnlyOffice.
I also, alongside LibreOffice, run SoftMaker's FreeOffice, OnlyOffice, KOffice, WPS Office AND a "standalone" version of the WORD word-processor from Office 2000!

Unlike maybe 90% of the Linux regulars that frequent most online fora, I freely admit I'm something of a software 'junkie'. I'm way more interested in what you can use an OS to actually DO, than I am in obsessing over the mechanics & "nitty-gritty" of the OS itself.

Because I re-package so much stuff for the Puppy community, along with building several small utilities, it explains why I frequently end up with copies of so many different apps that essentially do the same thing.....


Mike. :)
 

dos2unix

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dos2unix

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From my understand more then just fredora/red-hat use rpm

Redhat, CentOS, Rocky, AlmaLinux, OracleLinux, YellowDog, AmazonLinux, ScientificLinux, SuSE, and Fedora.

Back before we had package managers, we just installed *.tar.gz files. I'll probably just go back to that
for software that doesn't have RPMs.
 
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Leonardo_B

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i look deeper at website the have available for 7.6.0 and 7.5.4 for Pre-Release. I dont think it is going to died any time soon
prerelease.png
 

APTI

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I am pretty sure RPM for libre office will stay available but will need to be installed rather than come with the OS. No big deal if that is the case. Minor adjustment to my install scripts and easy enough to do with dnf.
 

KGIII

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No big deal if that is the case.

Yup. You'll just have to manually install it from the .rpm file that they release already. It just means RedHat isn't maintaining it any longer, probably because there's no real reason to do so. If you're using RHEL, odds are good that you can install an application via .rpm without even needing to read the manual.
 

wendy-lebaron

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From my understand more then just fredora/red-hat use rpm.
Away from the Red Hat Enterprise orbit, there are also Linux OS like ALT Linux, Mageia, OpenMandriva, OpenSUSE, PCLinuxOS, ROSA and a few more that use that package format. Although it could vary from RHEL.

Those are six I have installed or tried to install BTW.
 

APTI

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Away from the Red Hat Enterprise orbit, there are also Linux OS like ALT Linux, Mageia, OpenMandriva, OpenSUSE, PCLinuxOS, ROSA and a few more that use that package format. Although it could vary from RHEL.

Those are six I have installed or tried to install BTW.
i think running away from fedora because you have to install something you like on your own is a bit rash.
 

MikeWalsh

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I dont think it is going to died any time soon
Nah. Me neither.

Like @dos2unix says, before package management was a "thing", everybody did one of two things in the early days. Either compiled/built/installed from source, or - if using pre-compiled stuff, it usually came as a tarball - which still boiled down to manually installing everything in the right place yourself.

Whether .deb OR .rpm - .txz, in the case of Slackware - these are primarily construction conventions to keep things working in the 'approved' fashion with the chosen package management system. The actual component parts of the app itself are identical.

Red Hat, and indeed, most of the top-name distros like to compile from source code for their own, official repos.....for the same reason as above. Because it guarantees that everything will function smoothly & fuss-free within their eco-system.

Third-party sites like the official Libre Office site will supply packages in the most common & widely-used formats, since this guarantees compatibility with as many systems as possible.


Mike. ;)
 

f33dm3bits

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If you're using RHEL, odds are good that you can install an application via .rpm without even needing to read the manual.
I actually tried installing it, you get a whole bunch of rpms in an archive which you have to install locally. It actually goes against about being easily able to update something without any manual steps. It would have been nice if you only had to do that once and during installation of those rpms that a yum repo would have been added so that next time you can just update from without having to do any manual steps. I think having to download file to install/update software is more Windows like and too many manual steps involved, so I will be using the Flatpak version of Libreoffice once it's not available in the Fedora repos anymore.
 

KGIII

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It would have been nice if you only had to do that once and during installation of those rpms that a yum repo would have been added so that next time you can just update from without having to do any manual steps.

I'd wondered if that might be the case. So, while a pain in the butt, it shouldn't be too difficult to figure out.

Like you, I'd probably just go with the Flatpak.

I wonder what Rocky will do?
 

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