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xXNORDXx

Member
Just saying it wouldn't surprise me at all If my theory was true lol! I would gladly Pay a fee to who originally came up with Linux to be honest. Just out of respect for pulling it together so well and giving it away for free.
I mean hell we have paid for windows how many times and seen the blue screen of death?
haha!
 


wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
The only thing resembling boredom I experience, approaching my 6th year of solid Linux use, more like repetitive strain injury, really - is putting Likes on people's Posts, whom having barely scratched the surface, are already finding dozens of ways they enjoy Linux over the alternatives, but I am heartened by the prospect that they will come to enjoy it even more, as we do. :D

Wikipedia has this on Linus and Richard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Torvalds

and

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman

Linus' name is pronounced something like "leen-us tor-folds" (have a listen at Wikipedia).:)

Richard - Stallman launched the GNU Project, founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection and GNU Emacs, and wrote the GNU General Public License.

Linus - wrote the Linux Kernel, and maintains it, with help, to this day over 26 years on.

Between them they are the Lennon and McCartney of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS).

Wiz
 

xXNORDXx

Member
The only thing resembling boredom I experience, approaching my 6th year of solid Linux use, more like repetitive strain injury, really - is putting Likes on people's Posts, whom having barely scratched the surface, are already finding dozens of ways they enjoy Linux over the alternatives, but I am heartened by the prospect that they will come to enjoy it even more, as we do. :D

Wikipedia has this on Linus and Richard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linus_Torvalds

and

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman

Linus' name is pronounced something like "leen-us tor-folds" (have a listen at Wikipedia).:)

Richard - Stallman launched the GNU Project, founded the Free Software Foundation, developed the GNU Compiler Collection and GNU Emacs, and wrote the GNU General Public License.

Linus - wrote the Linux Kernel, and maintains it, with help, to this day over 26 years on.

Between them they are the Lennon and McCartney of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS).

Wiz
that link was a good read thanks!
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
You're welcome, Yoda, may The Force be with you
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Not for the faint hearted.......not for me either !
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
I "borrowed" this from ....somewhere....(dont ask)

If it helps, good stuff !

if it screws something up....Timeshift. (you do have Timeshift installed and setup?....Yes?)


To install Conky from the terminal in Mint and Ubuntu etc, run:

sudo apt-get install conky-all
To run Conky with the default display either type conky in your applications search facility in the menu (or in dash on Ubuntu) and select Conky. Or alternatively type:
conky &
... in a terminal. The ampersand is used to start the default conky as a background process, meaning you can simply press Ctrl^c (i.e. hold down Ctrl and press c) to close the terminal, as it would otherwise be run in the terminal rather than in the background.

You can see the default configuration file at /etc/conky/conky.conf, and you'll find other useful documents in /usr/share/doc/conky-all

I doubt that many people use the default display though, so here is how to change it. You can use any text editor, and I'm going to use nano.

First of all create a file called .conkyrc in your Home directory. To create the file using nano text editor, type or paste the following into a terminal:

nano .conkyrc
Next you need to put a script for conky in the file, as up to now it has been using the default configuration in /etc/conky/conky.conf

You can search the internet for .conkyrc scripts and use one you like, many of which will be configured to work on particular destops and/or require additional applications to be installed; so here is mine that I can confirm works on KDE, MATE and Gnome3 desktops. It uses minimal system resources and doesn't require any additional software to be installed, and you could use to get you started.

alignment top_right
background true
border_width 1
cpu_avg_samples 2
default_color green
default_outline_color white
default_shade_color white
draw_borders no
draw_graph_borders no
draw_outline no
draw_shades no
use_xft yes
xftfont Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:size=10
gap_x 5
gap_y 110
minimum_size 5 5
net_avg_samples 2
double_buffer yes
out_to_console no
own_window yes
own_window_argb_visual yes
own_window_argb_value 100
own_window_transparent yes
own_window_type normal
own_window_hints undecorated,below,sticky,skip_taskbar,skip_pager
stippled_borders 0
update_interval 03.0
uppercase no
use_spacer none
show_graph_scale no
show_graph_range no

TEXT
${color}${scroll 16 $nodename - $sysname $kernel on $machine | }
${color white}$hr
${color}Uptime:$uptime
${color white}$hr
${color}RAM Usage:$mem/$memmax - $memperc% ${membar 7}
Swap Usage:$swap/$swapmax - $swapperc% ${swapbar 7}
${color white}$hr
${color}CPU 1: ${cpu cpu1}% ${cpubar cpu1}
CPU 2: ${cpu cpu2}% ${cpubar cpu2}
Frequency: ${freq}MHz
CPU 1 Temp: ${hwmon 1 temp 1}C CPU 2 Temp: ${hwmon 2 temp 1}C
${color white}$hr
${color}File systems: ${fs_free /}/${fs_size /} ${fs_bar 6 /}
${color white}$hr
${color}Networking:
Up: ${upspeed wlan0}/s Down: ${downspeed wlan0}/s
${color white}$hr
${color}Processes:$processes Running:$running_processes
${color white}$hr
${color}Name CPU% MEM% USER
${top name 1} ${top cpu 1} ${top mem 1} ${top user 1}
${top name 2} ${top cpu 2} ${top mem 2} ${top user 2}
${top name 3} ${top cpu 3} ${top mem 3} ${top user 3}
${top name 4} ${top cpu 4} ${top mem 4} ${top user 4}
${top name 5} ${top cpu 5} ${top mem 5} ${top user 5}
Simply copy and paste that, or whatever script you decide to use, into your .conkyrc file.

This script is configured for a dual-core CPU and for the purposes of this post, wifi as well. This is what it looks like:



To change the green text to, for example white, simply change the line that says:

default_color green
to:
default_color white
If you use ethernet (and your connection is called eth0) then change the instances of "wlan0" to "eth0".

If your CPU is single-core then change "CPU1" to "CPU0" and delete the portions of script relating to CPU2. Or if for example your CPU has four cores, then using the parts of script relating to CPU1 and CPU2 as examples, add more lines using the same script and typing CPU3 and CPU4, etc. You will soon get the hang of which parts of the script do what.

When you have finished editing the .conkyrc file, save and exit nano.

Note that the background parameter is set to "true" which means that Conky will now start as a background process automatically, so there is no longer any need to use ampersand when starting it from a terminal. But it seems that most people like Conky to start automatically, which is certainly what I've always done. Rather than simply add Conky to your list of start-up applications, I recommend instead creating a start up file with a delay, and adding a path to the file to your start up applications. This ensures that Conky won't be trying to start at the same time as your desktop loads, and it has been known to interfere with applications such as Compiz when it tries to start simultaneously.

My conky start file is called conkystart, but you can name it anything you like. You can also of course use any text editor to create it, but just for fun I'm creating it with the cat command because it only has two lines of text, which are as follows:

#!/bin/bash
sleep 10 && conky;
To create a file called conkystart in your Home directory using cat, containing the above code, open a terminal and paste or type the following lines one at a time, and press enter after pasting/typing each line:

cat > conkystart
#!/bin/bash
sleep 10 && conky;
After typing/pasting the final line and pressing enter, press Ctrl^d

Now the file and its contents have been created. Next you need to make the file executable:

chmod +x conkystart
Now all that remains to be done is to add the path to your conkystart file to the Startup applications. Open your Startup applications utility, and click "add" to add Conky to the list of applications. Type in the name of the application and a description if you like, then either type in the path to the conkystart file in the box for "command" or browse to the file and select it:





Now Conky will start automatically, 10 seconds after you log in, which should be shortly after your desktop has finished loading. You can adjust the "10" parameter in the conkystart file to suit the speed that your computer loads the desktop.

Should you want to stop Conky running for whatever reason, open a terminal and type:

killall conky
EDIT: If the start-up script doesn't work in more recent Linux distros, instead, try creating the following file: ~/.config/autostart/conky.desktop

[Desktop Entry]
Exec=sleep 3 && conky
Hidden=false
Icon=system-run
Path=
Terminal=false
Type=Application
 

xXNORDXx

Member
Interesting , sorry I had to take a break from computer stuff I get obsessed with it then before you know it its 5 am lol! I may try to go at it again today.
 

xXNORDXx

Member
Drinking Irish red ale listening to Judas preist while reading Essential Linux Command Line by Rob . I must say I have a better look on this but I'm sure I will be going back to the PDF Kindle .
THanks Rob!
 

xXNORDXx

Member
Looking for Linux classes to take to get more familiar with this operating system .
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
@Condobloke ... my goodness, quoting Al ? :):confused::eek::rolleyes:o_O;)

I have used that though a couple of years ago, and it works fine.

@xXNORDXx - if you get into Conkies, there is an industry standard called Conky Manager, which is a part of the stable belonging to our good friend Tony George of teejeetech.in - the author of Timeshift.

I have yet to find if there is an up-to-date version, it may have only been supported until Ubuntu's 16.04, rather than the 18.04LTS currently out (and upon which Linux Mint 19 is based), but I'll check around.

... Linux classes

EdX are a bunch around for a long time, usually have expensive courses, but a couple of years ago, they started collaborating with the Linux Foundation, and the results are here.

https://www.edx.org/course/introduction-to-linux

Self-paced, free - sounds good to me!

I ran it 4 years ago, was quite good.

Wiz
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
@xXNORDXx there is an app in Linux mint, software manager, called Fbreader it will open kindle (mobipocket) files....but NOT if they are DRM-protected.

Worth a try

It opens epub files/format beautifully.....which if you 'obtain' reading material from online, is an absolute must have

@wizardfromoz .....quoting Al.....the useless bastard has to be good for something eh !
 
Last edited:

wizardfromoz

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Staff member
Gold Supporter
 


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