Linux Screen Brightness

edyuser12345

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I have lowered the brightness of my screen to the maximum, there is a tool or software to lower the brightness of the linux system even more, I use Linux Ubuntu
 


This does not belong in Off Topic, moving it to Audio-Video

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 
I get this warning when I run the command

▶ brightness-controller
Warning: Ignoring XDG_SESSION_TYPE=wayland on Gnome. Use QT_QPA_PLATFORM=wayland to run on Wayland anyway.
 
I have lowered the brightness of my screen to the maximum, there is a tool or software to lower the brightness of the linux system even more, I use Linux Ubuntu
The xcalib program, if you are running X, will control brightness and contrast and gamma. For example, the following lowers brightness on my screen:
Code:
xcalib -a -co 70
Run: xcalib -c, to clear it. There's lots to experiment with the program and I expect that different commands will suit different monitors.
 
The xcalib program, if you are running X, will control brightness and contrast and gamma. For example, the following lowers brightness on my screen:
Code:
xcalib -a -co 70
Run: xcalib -c, to clear it. There's lots to experiment with the program and I expect that different commands will suit different monitors.
Screenshot from 2024-03-18 12-38-58.png
 
On my computer system I have the brightness at maximum low but I want to set the brightness lower
 
The reason I want to do this is because I spend many hours in front of a computer and my eyes hurt.
 
On my computer system I have the brightness at maximum low but I want to set the brightness lower
If you have really reached the maximum low (also called minimum)... then that's probably all you're going to get from software brightness controls.

If you are using an external monitor on a desktop, the monitor will likely have its own internal controls for brightness that may lower it more. Look for a Menu-type button on the front bottom of the monitor, or on the side edge. Or Google for your monitor brand/model to find a user manual for more information.

If your screen is on a laptop or an external monitor, you can also attempt to put some kind of "smoked film or glass" over the screen itself... something like "window tinting" on car windows. A quick look on Amazon turns up these, for example. Or these for blue light control.

But you might also look at Redshift to see if it may help with your eye strain. It is a software method of controlling the blue light... not a brightness control.

If covering the screen with a film doesn't appeal to you, you can also cover your eyes instead... with sunglasses. :cool:

Good luck!
 
I have lowered the brightness of my screen to the maximum, there is a tool or software to lower the brightness of the linux system even more

A lot of monitors ( I don't know about all of them ) have a brightness control on the monitor itself.
My monitors remember the settings when I turn the computer off.
 
Warning: Ignoring XDG_SESSION_TYPE=wayland on Gnome. Use QT_QPA_PLATFORM=wayland to run on Wayland anyway
This warning is most likely do to the use of Wayland instead of Xorg - you could try disabling Wayland

1)Disabled Wayland by uncommenting WaylandEnable=false in the /etc/gdm3/custom.conf
2)Add QT_QPA_PLATFORM=xcb in /etc/environment
3)Check whether you are on Wayland or Xorg using:echo $XDG_SESSION_TYPE

if this does not work you can simply undo it
 
But you might also look at Redshift to see if it may help with your eye strain. It is a software method of controlling the blue light... not a brightness control.
@atanere :-

Mm-hm. I was just going to mention that myself, but ya beat me to it..!

The OP probably has the same issue many of us do - especially when spending hours in front of a monitor, and even more so when much of that is after dark. And most definitely as you get older...

It's not the "brightness", per se, that gives problems. It's as @atanere says; it's the blue component of the visible light spectrum that gives your eyes hell. Not only that, but after dark & getting near your usual "shut-eye" time, it'll give you insomnia due to upsetting the body's natural Circadian sleep cycle.

RedShift is the "go-to" recommended Linux equivalent to the app used for this in Windows; f.Lux. (There IS a Linux build of f.Lux, apparently, but where the Windows & MacOS builds have a nice GUI, the Linux one is command-line only.....and having experimented with it some years ago, it's a total PITA to get running properly).

RedShift is MUCH simpler!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
We've played around with screen-control apps a fair bit in Puppy. We discovered, some time ago, a tiny, pre-compiled binary called sct. The 'original' was developed by Ted Unangst:-

https://flak.tedunangst.com/post/sct-set-color-temperature

.....although others have taken up the mantle and developed it further:-

https://github.com/faf0/sct

You place this wee item under /usr/bin (any of the '/bins' will do, TBH. The system will find it in these locations), open a terminal and enter the value you want.

Code:
sct 6500

...for instance, will give you standard daytime light. For after dark, It's recommended to use anywhere between 3000-4500, depending on personal taste. My usual setting for this is around 3300:-

Code:
sct 3300

It'll accept values anywhere between 1000 and 10,000.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~​

One of our Puppy forum members, fredx181, has built a wee 'self-extracter' that runs in /tmp for the session, using both the lightweight, command-line version of RedShift and xrandr's gamma-based 'brightness' option. It has built-in geo-location, options to switch from 'manual' operation to 'auto' (and back), and the whole thing runs from an icon in the notification area of the tray.

RedShift is a bit 'iffy' under Puppy due to some of Pup's unique operating parameters, so Fred's 'RedShift-lite' works better for us, since it was built FOR Puppy.....


Mike. ;)
 
He is only 19. i wonder what else is affecting his eyes ?......o_O.....

He needs to see an optometrist
 
Last edited:
@GatorsFan :-

Thanks for the link!

I'm a long-term specs wearer; very nearly 60 years. I got my first pair when I was just 4 yrs old, and I'm coming up to 63 this year..... (sigh...)

These look like a neat idea.....especially given that with me being short-sighted, it's not just a case of wearing them for reading/'puter use or 'close-up' work.....I have to wear mine all day long. Without 'em, it's kinda like using a pair of binoculars that are out-of-focus all the time.....imagine that, and you'll understand exactly what my eyesight is like when I take my specs off.

Can't see a bloody thing!!! :rolleyes:


Mike. :p
 

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