Day to Day with Linux

Correct on that part.



Incorrect with that part.

1. You can't install it because
2. It is a symbolic link to another command, eg systemctl

Try typing

Code:
man shutdown

and you will get the usage.

The default timeframe with just sudo shutdown (or shutdown as root) is 60 seconds, described as "+1" in the manual.

Bear in mind, too, that Rob wrote this tutorial 10.5 years ago, so cut him some slack with -h not being necessary, it undoubtedly changed over the years.

Cheers

Wizard
Respectfully, you could install it by creating the symbolic link yourself?
 


...you could install it by creating the symbolic link yourself?

You certainly can create a symbolic link yourself to provide that functionality, but you are not installing a package, and you would be duplicating a functionality that is already in Debian, and has been for years.

Hope that clarifies the subject.

Cheers

Wizard
 
You certainly can create a symbolic link yourself to provide that functionality, but you are not installing a package, and you would be duplicating a functionality that is already in Debian, and has been for years.

Hope that clarifies the subject.

Cheers

Wizard
I appreciate the feedback, i didn't say anything packages, yet i can see why you think "install" is not the right way to phrase making the symbolic link.
 
I think - if I'm totally honest about it! - that much of what we get up to in Puppyland would make most Linux user's hair curl with disapproval.

With "our Pup" being very much a 'hobbyist' distro, we employ a LOT of what would be regarded as "shady practices".......certainly stuff you're never taught about in official, or even semi-official tutorials. But invariably we get things working.....

.....which all goes to show that Linux itself is even more flexible than many veterans would have you believe. Not being tied to any kind of official package-management system DOES have its advantages..! :p

We just grab software from anywhere we can find it.....and 'tweak it' till it works.


Mike. ;)
 
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With "our Pup" being very much a 'hobbyist' distro, we employ a LOT of what would be regarded as "shady practices".......certainly stuff you're never taught about in official, or even semi-official tutorials. But invariably we get things working.....
I am much more interested in pupply linux now :)
 
If I am in Terminal, and wish to exit/reboot, I often use

Code:
init 6
Sounds like you're making your life harder than it should be. In any distro I've ever used or tried for a day or two the word "reboot" + Enter does exactly that. No need to stop and think "ugh, what was the command and the number? Sh*t, I forgot, now I have to Google it for a few hours". :D That plain and simple word "reboot" which means exactly what you need does it.
And no distro has ever asked me to use sudo in order to reboot, not even Arch.

As for the topic, I don't shut down my computer. I mostly suspend it to RAM (sleep). The only cases where I actually shut it down is to replace hardware, to clean it from dust or when I'm going on vacation for longer than 2 days.
 
Sounds like you're making your life harder than it should be.

Not particularly.

reboot - 6 letters
init 6 - 5 letters and a space = 6

Same length, and "init system" makes for easy remembering.

shutdown - 8 letters
init 0 (zero) - only 5 letters and a space = 6

So shorter.

On

And no distro has ever asked me to use sudo in order to reboot, not even Arch.

You have not tried enough distros :)

If you have tried and used regularly as many distros as I have, you learn "Never say never".

Arch-based distro Artix has

Code:
Artix-MATE-HDD:[chris]:~$ reboot
 * openrc-shutdown: you must be root

and so sudo must be used in it

(Artix Linux is a fork (or continuation as an autonomous project) of the Arch-OpenRC and Manjaro-OpenRC projects)

That being said, I have another dozen or so Arch-based distros, and I use reboot for them.

But wherever the init commands are recognised, I use them.

Cheers

Wizard
 
It's odd that this thread is titled, Day to Day with Linux and the only thing I've read in this thread is a debate on using Terminal to shut down the computer. I guess there is nothing else to do day-to-day on a Linux system?

Right, wrong or indifferent, I just sudo shutdown or sudo restart. But it's not a server and no one else is on my network.
 
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