Best cloud service provider for my case?

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I am tired with my laptop vm. The laptop is seemingly powerful. 1TB SATA SSD and 16GB RAM. But i5 processor. But when I run 3 VMs on it, they freak out and hang. I am tired because my multi-server learnings like nginx-reverse proxy, load balancing, and things that require mutliple servers are getting hampered.

I want a cloud service provider. I am currently learning docker and nginx, then I'll learn kubernetes in the future. So, I need to build tons of clusters. Please recommend me a good online VM(paid ofc), that is most suitable for my case.

My budet isn't that much as my needs aren't that much, I just wanna learn.

Consider that I'm from Nepal if any Nepalese reading this post. Nepali International cards don't run everywhere.
 


AWS is free for a while. Google Cloud Platform is also free for a while. Oracle also has a free tier for some stuff.

I'd look into those.
 
If you want to learn and tight on budget, i'll suggest to use your laptop only. No cloud provider is going to give you a better specs hardware than your laptop.

Instead of using multiple VMs, install ubuntu on your system and run minikube, docker. It will work fine. I also started learning on a laptop with 2CPU and 8GB RAM. Let me know if you need any futher assistance. :) I;ll be happy to help.
 
If you want to learn and tight on budget, i'll suggest to use your laptop only. No cloud provider is going to give you a better specs hardware than your laptop.

Using one's laptop, is not cloud computing and can't fulfil many of the functions and uses which cloud computing satisfies. The OP already mentioned that VM's didn't work for him.

Uses of the cloud include:

a) using applications in the cloud whether they be relatively straightforward tasks like word processing or spreadsheet usage, or more involved DevOps or data base operations;

b) providing access to one's own documents and software from multiple sources such as one's desktop, laptop, phone, public online service provision through libraries or other institutions, all largely independent of geography;

c) having relatively reliable data recovery and back-up facilities.

Cloud computing has become reasonably sophisticated with cloud native technologies well in excess of what one's standard computers might do by default, for example with data analytics, though these may not be so relevant for individual's relatively modest usage.

There are issues with using the cloud, like costs, trusting free services, security concerns when one's work is in the hands of second and third parties, so it's useful to think about its applicabiity.
 
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I have a few people I know who are ham radio guys and they want a home lab for Linux and stuff. Normally, I just have them pick up a refurbished desktop (usually sub $200) on eBay and spec it to need with memory and storage if it doesn't come with enough.

Obviously, before you buy one. Look at what it's current memory and storage are and what it's capable of to ensure it can meet your requirements.
 
I have a few people I know who are ham radio guys and they want a home lab for Linux and stuff. Normally, I just have them pick up a refurbished desktop (usually sub $200) on eBay and spec it to need with memory and storage if it doesn't come with enough.

Obviously, before you buy one. Look at what it's current memory and storage are and what it's capable of to ensure it can meet your requirements.
Hi, ... David, the Linux Engineer :)
The issue with used equipment for the cloud, if one is self-serving in the matter, is the reliability of it. I think an optimal arrangement is to have one's backed-up data and software loaded onto equipment that is as new, or newer than the hardware one ordinarily uses since, although it may be less used, its reliability is the crucial factor. In those terms, a functioning used computer with a new storage disk would be ideal compared with a second-hand used storage disk of unknown history. I know there a few good testing programs for checking old hard disks, including manufacturer's test suites, but experience with the unpredictable are just that. Ultimately it may depend on how one values their data.
 
Hi, ... David, the Linux Engineer :)
The issue with used equipment for the cloud, if one is self-serving in the matter, is the reliability of it. I think an optimal arrangement is to have one's backed-up data and software loaded onto equipment that is as new, or newer than the hardware one ordinarily uses since, although it may be less used, its reliability is the crucial factor. In those terms, a functioning used computer with a new storage disk would be ideal compared with a second-hand used storage disk of unknown history. I know there a few good testing programs for checking old hard disks, including manufacturer's test suites, but experience with the unpredictable are just that. Ultimately it may depend on how one values their data.
Hi osprey,

I was referring to the OP about having a home lab to work on things since his laptop was causing him pain. I wouldn't proffer such a solution that was the basis of something critical in nature.

Backup, then backup your backups! I do!
 
I am tired with my laptop vm. The laptop is seemingly powerful. 1TB SATA SSD and 16GB RAM. But i5 processor. But when I run 3 VMs on it, they freak out and hang. I am tired because my multi-server learnings like nginx-reverse proxy, load balancing, and things that require mutliple servers are getting hampered.

I want a cloud service provider. I am currently learning docker and nginx, then I'll learn kubernetes in the future. So, I need to build tons of clusters. Please recommend me a good online VM(paid ofc), that is most suitable for my case.

My budet isn't that much as my needs aren't that much, I just wanna learn.

Consider that I'm from Nepal if any Nepalese reading this post. Nepali International cards don't run everywhere.
I suggest taking a look at DigitalOcean, Linode, or Vultr. These platforms offer cost-effective options that are perfect for learning purposes. They have user-friendly interfaces, comprehensive documentation, and helpful communities that can greatly support you on your journey. Given your location in Nepal and the possible challenges with international cards, it would be beneficial to investigate whether these providers accept alternative payment methods or offer localized support for payments in Nepal. Also, keep an eye out for any special promotions or student discounts that these providers may occasionally provide.
 
Hey, You can make an account on AWS. Once you have an account on AWS, then you can do all the things on your local machine using localstack ( https://github.com/localstack/localstack ) . I do this to simulate my aws different environments. It's free for most of services.
 

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