Question about a book

statichash

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I have a book "Sams Teach Yourself LInux Programming in 24 Hours" by Warren W. Gay. The book explores programming in C on linux. It seems to be a really good book. I have worked through some of the chapters and everything so far has worked on the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS version. The book was published in 1999. My question is, do you think this book is still relevant or is there another up-to-date book on this same subject that would serve me better? Any suggestions on other resources about C programming on Linux would be great. I have done some google searches but could not find anything comparable to this book.
Thanks.
 


jglen490

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There's nothing wrong with C, it actually is a really good language and has been around forever, much older than 1999. Much of Linux is C. It is not C++, although close. And it is not C#.

Once you learn C, progressing to more modern languages is fairly easy, in my opinion.

A long time ago, in another lifetime, I wrote a simple GUI (in C) and gave it to our local elementary school that had received a lot of old PCs, with various levels of Windows and DOS - and was given a brand new LAN for free by a local company. It worked fine, and eventually the school got some modern PCs and software.
 

gvisoc

Active Member
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I have a book "Sams Teach Yourself LInux Programming in 24 Hours" by Warren W. Gay. The book explores programming in C on linux. It seems to be a really good book. I have worked through some of the chapters and everything so far has worked on the latest Ubuntu 20.04 LTS version. The book was published in 1999. My question is, do you think this book is still relevant or is there another up-to-date book on this same subject that would serve me better? Any suggestions on other resources about C programming on Linux would be great. I have done some google searches but could not find anything comparable to this book.
Thanks.
Hi

TL;DR: yes, the book is still relevant.

Linux and most of the Unix variants nowadays have some degree with POSIX compliance, being that level from very high to "full but we don't want to pay the certification". POSIX stands for "Portable Operating System Interface" and defines pretty much how a process is seen by the operating system and how processes can interact to each other. Most of it is packed into C libraries like the Standard Library and others like signal.h, which level of POSIX-compliance and C standard (C89, C99) you can check with man 2 signal. There are more than that one, it's just an example to be able to handle your process in runtime. So, as long as you use your standard libraries and the standard GNU/Linux signal definitions, and you know your filesystems and the rest of the OS organisation, you're good and that stuff is pretty much stable since the 1988 (for POSIX) and even before for the kernel and filesystem.

For any other than interacting with the Operating System I always recommend "The C programming language" by Kernighan and Ritchie.
 

NathanSchofield

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hello, a familiar book to me, a couple of months ago I read it, of course not the best option, but in general I liked it as a beginner. In general, I often read book reviews before reading them, I myself use and recommend you a resource for selecting book reviews in the future, for example, studydriver.com/peer-pressure-essay/ a resource with short materials in which the smallest and most important points are disclosed in the abstract or in detail. On the example of O'Brien's lives of the Dead book review, you can see for yourself the coolness of such a presentation, plus you will study a social problem of peer pressure, good luck in your development!
 

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