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Processor Architecture?

Rover

New Member
I was going to download Debian and when going to get the ISO I have to choose it depending on my Processor's Architecture, and I have no idea how to look at it, any guideline?

Also, should I get 'small installation image' or complete one?
I've read 'small' needs Internet to install, which I don't like, but also read I should be sure that I need packages on them, so I'm kinda lost.
And the last one: Are the CD Image (650MB) and DVD Image (4'4GB) the same? It can't be... But they're both options on 'complete installation image'.

I'm not worried about space, neither large downloads, I just want to understand a bit better all of this and ending with the image that will work the best for me in any scenario.

Thanks in advance ;)
 


atanere

Moderator
Gold Supporter
Debian's website is very confusing to help you find the distro you really want or need. But for anyone who is new to Linux and wants to try Debian, I would strongly recommend that you get a "live" image and burn it to DVD or USB. This is what is most normally done with all other distros these days. It allows you to boot on the DVD or USB and run it in "live mode" before you commit to installing it. Most of the other Debian options you are looking at will want to install to your hard drive right away, and that's often not a good idea until you know more. These "live" images are also called "Hybrid ISO's", and here is the page for you to find and download them.

Once on the download page, the only architecture question you need to evaluate is whether you need amd-64 or i386. This is simple really: i386 is for very old computers using 32-bit CPU's, and amd-64 is for newer 64-bit CPU's. These work with both AMD and Intel brand processors. If your computer is ancient, you might want to find out first what you have... but it's most likely 64-bit.

[EDIT] Those are "pure Debian" images, meaning they have totally free software in them. This is a noble idea, but the reality is that it is often easier for new users to get Debian that includes non-free software too. That can especially help your wifi internet to work right away instead of trying to set it up manually. This link takes you to the page for images with non-free software, and from there you can look into i386 or amd-64, as needed. [/EDIT]

When you follow the link into the proper architecture that you want, there you will find the latest stable Debian version (9.9.0) and all the many choices there are for you to pick which Desktop Environment (DE) that you want. The DE is your graphical interface, and you'll just need to try some out to see what you like. But the file to download is the .iso file for whichever DE you choose. The .iso files are in the neighborhood of 2 GB in size, so they may take a long while to download completely, depending on your internet connection.

You don't need the .packages files, or the .log files.... just the .iso files. But, if you want to verify that you got a complete and uncorrupted .iso download, you can also download either the MD5SUMS or SHA256SUMS files (or both) that are shown at the top of the page. Those files contain "checksum values" that you can use to check the integrity of the .iso file you downloaded. This is a good practice before burning the .iso to DVD or USB so you will be more confident that the install will go smoothly. There are free tools available for Windows, and Linux has a built in tool to show you the checksum value of the file you download, and if it matches the checksum in the file(s) from Debian, then you're good to go.

Cheers
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Download the Net Installer and create a bootable CD and do a net install this is the best way imo.

https://www.debian.org/CD/netinst/

netinst CD image (generally 150-300 MB, varies by architecture)

Go to the above link and this section.
Official netinst images for the stable release

Choose amd64 for Debian 64 bit install.
Download the netinst CD image and not the torrent download.
 

Rover

New Member
K, I've downloaded 'debian-live-9.9.0-amd64-gnome+nonfree.iso', and I'll try it out. My actual plan is to run it live, format my hd to the ground and reinstall then Debian, to further working on VMs, since Mageia (which I installed for future server-related-testing, which is still a bit far) is not running as smoothly as I'd like to.
I'm working on a Lenovo V110, and sometimes my files get funny (when I move a few files into a directory it's like nothing's happening, even if I refresh or just wait, but then if I try again a few times it finally works and shows an error for any lasting try on the pile, I guess).
Any contraindication? Some advice on the issue?

Thanks a lot anyway, as always :p
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter

Rover

New Member
I understood I am working with 64-bits, that's why I've downloaded that specific Image of Debian, about Mageia, it's Mageia 6, but I was willing to format about now.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
That's fine, Mate, you do what you want to do.

You can always add Mageia to the mix again later, as a dual boot if you wish.

Cheers

Wizard
 

Vrai

Active Member
sometimes my files get funny (when I move a few files into a directory it's like nothing's happening, even if I refresh or just wait, but then if I try again a few times it finally works and shows an error for any lasting try on the pile, I guess).
Any contraindication? Some advice on the issue?

Thanks a lot anyway, as always :p
This would be very concerning to me. If the disk write cache is that slow I would be very worried about the integrity of the disk.
Have you checked the hard drive to determine if it is performing 'normally' as expected?
 

Rover

New Member
This would be very concerning to me. If the disk write cache is that slow I would be very worried about the integrity of the disk.
Have you checked the hard drive to determine if it is performing 'normally' as expected?
How do I do that? :oops:
 

Vrai

Active Member
How do I do that? :oops:
@Rover
If you put the following in your search engine there are many useful results;
Code:
debian file system check
and/or
Code:
hard drive check linux
Code:
disk repair for linux
A few examples:
https://www.tecmint.com/check-linux-hard-disk-bad-sectors-bad-blocks/
https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/37659/the-beginners-guide-to-linux-disk-utilities/
https://www.ghacks.net/2017/07/19/how-to-check-hard-drive-disk-health-in-gnulinux/
https://www.linode.com/docs/quick-answers/linux/how-to-use-fsck-to-fix-disk-problems/
The hard drive may be fine but the information gleaned should be interesting. When troubleshooting an issue I like to eliminate possible causes one by one.If the disk checks out 'Healthy' then other causes can be investigated.

I sometimes use a program called 'SpinRite' which claims to scan and attempt repairs on drives.
It is a rather 'pricey' program though.
https://www.grc.com/intro.htm
 

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