• We had to restore from a backup today after a failed software update. Backup was from 0000 EDT and restored it at 0800 EDT so we lost about 8hrs. Today is 07/20/2024. More info here.

My Tower Has Died.

I too, used to alter my UEFI booting computers too BIOS mode, but now I just install in UEFI mode, it's come a long way since the beginnings, & nowadays it's almost as easy - you do get the odd one that needs assistance, but not very often. :)
Same here. UEFI is faster on my machines than BIOS was, and I guess that's because it's a more efficient booting process with more up-to-date firmware as a result of its more modern development. It's unnecessary in my case with regard to it's facilitating secure boot and ability to deal with huge disk capacities, but just as a more modern efficient means of running the machine, its presence is worth taking advantage of.
 


I rang them yesterday (Saturday) only to be told we are still trying to get Linux to boot (3 days)..no technicians work weekends.

So I went there with my Mint Cinnamon 21.1 Flash Drive...one of the guys turned on my Tower and I asked to change to legacy mode...it wouldn't boot to my Flash Drive...just got the motherboard logo.
Both secure boot and fast boot are disabled...they picked the motherboard not me.

I think this board...https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/B760M-AORUS-ELITE-AX-rev-1x#kf is not compatible with Linux...so tomorrow I'll be ringing them and telling them I want a Motherboard that's compatible with Linux or I want a refund and I'll go somewhere else.

The problem is no one there knows anything about Linux...when I first went there I said I run Linux...thinking someone would know a little bit about it...I was wrong. :mad:
 
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no technicians work weekends.
Hopefully that will be the answer.

I have just looked over the page HERE of course they make no mention of Linux compatibility, but that is normal for most all motherboard manufacturers.

This site mentions that motherboard as being compatible... https://bestpcadvisor.net/best-motherboards-for-linux/

NOTE: It has an UEFI bios....so it really should behave itself easily.

Make sure that Secureboot is DISABLED. Instinct tells me that will be important.

2023-07-16_12-18.png
 
Hopefully that will be the answer.

I have just looked over the page HERE of course they make no mention of Linux compatibility, but that is normal for most all motherboard manufacturers.

This site mentions that motherboard as being compatible... https://bestpcadvisor.net/best-motherboards-for-linux/

NOTE: It has an UEFI bios....so it really should behave itself easily.

Make sure that Secureboot is DISABLED. Instinct tells me that will be important.

View attachment 16373

Thanks for that...techos can't get it to boot when they are there. :eek:
 
You had better ask them if they have disabled secure boot, Bob
 
@bob466 :-

Highly unlikely that any mobo manufacturer would build a piece of hardware that's ONLY compatible with a given operating system. In any case, mobos are more concerned with handling I/O operations, interrupts, architectures, power & data distribution & supply, etc, etc.......which has absolutely nothing to do with the ideological differences that exist between the various camps of developers that write code to run on them.

I would say nobody at the shop knows the first thing about Linux, and more to the point has no interest in learning about the necessary 'tricks' that are needed. 99% of their customers will be using the same, standard OS, and all their diagnostic tools & software will be set-up for Windows.....why bother to put themselves out for the odd individual?

Unfortunately, you'll also find that most of these repair people will take the view that since the folks that DO run Linux tend to be tech-savvy.......why aren't you replacing your own motherboard? Why bother US?

(shrug)


Mike. o_O
 
@bob466 :-

Highly unlikely that any mobo manufacturer would build a piece of hardware that's ONLY compatible with a given operating system. In any case, mobos are more concerned with handling I/O operations, interrupts, architectures, power & data distribution & supply, etc, etc.......which has absolutely nothing to do with the ideological differences that exist between the various camps of developers that write code to run on them.

I would say nobody at the shop knows the first thing about Linux, and more to the point has no interest in learning about the necessary 'tricks' that are needed. 99% of their customers will be using the same, standard OS, and all their diagnostic tools & software will be set-up for Windows.....why bother to put themselves out for the odd individual?

Unfortunately, you'll also find that most of these repair people will take the view that since the folks that DO run Linux tend to be tech-savvy.......why aren't you replacing your own motherboard? Why bother US?

(shrug)


Mike. o_O

Mike,
you hit the nail right on the head...rang them this morning and was told we're still trying to boot to Linux...so I said either get a motherboard that's compatible with Linux or give me a refund.

Guy says If you can get a motherboard that's compatible because we only deal with windowz...no surprise there...so I'm getting a refund.

Why should I have to do their job for them...the attitude is the thing that gets me..give us till the end of the day to take out the parts...I'm going tomorrow to get my Tower. :mad:
 
@bob466 :-

Ah, I'm only going from my own past experience, mate. Being something of a "hardware" nut anyway, I long ago came to the conclusion that I'm better off doing my own hardware upgrades.......and am more likely to do a satisfactory job in any case. It's in my own interest to do as good a job as I possibly can, and I've always taken the attitude that if you're going to do something, then do your research first, make absolutely certain that you cover all the bases, and do said job to the very best of your ability the first time.....because that way, you shouldn't need to go back and have to re-do it again.

That said, of course, it can't take into account the possibility of sourcing duff components. You're rather at the mercy of the supplier, and the modern internet-based purchasing/delivery system. Plus, I appreciate that not everybody is technically-minded enough to take on a project of this type......though having said that, there's a thousand-and-one online guides to doing this stuff, and at the end of the day, it's basically just a giant Meccano job; most stuff is designed to only go together correctly ONE way, and if you take your time, think what you're doing and excercise all appropriate caution, it's not beyond the capabilities of most people.

When you're done, double-check all connections, etc. And then double-check 'em again!

I wish you luck with this. Keep us informed, anyway, and if we can offer advice or help in any other way, I'm sure the community will rally round. Good luck!


Mike. ;)
 
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MSI B450 Tomahawk
Stay away from that one.
Last year MSI had the highest failure rate of all the majors!
If I'm building for a client, and they want a tower PC, I always use Gigabyte, but post covid a lot of manufacturer's QC has gone down the toilet.
 
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I've never been so frustrated in all my life...the motherboards Condobloke gave me are all superseded...B450 was replaced by B550.

I rang Gigabyte Australia and asked what motherboards are compatible with Linux...they said "we don't give out that information"...what a bloody joke...they don't even check and I would say the same for them all. I rang a few computer shops by none want to know or care about Linux.

I don't buy old or second hand parts or refurbished computers as this is a waste of good money...so what motherboard is compatible is anyone's guess...no one will let you try it first. Not all modern motherboards will run Linux as I have found out. It was suggested on a new motherboard install windowz and run Linux as a VM...might be my only option but I'll have to think about that. :mad:
o_O
 
I've never been so frustrated in all my life...the motherboards Condobloke gave me are all superseded...B450 was replaced by B550.
Whenever I buy a new system I just buy and then install because I've never had issues with my setups. However it's probably a good idea to go with a motherboard with en intel network card and you will probably get more power for less money if you go with the AMD platform.
 
I don't buy old or second hand parts or refurbished computers as this is a waste of good money...
I've never had any problem with used parts and they can be gotten from Ebay dirt cheap if you're willing to search the pages.

...so what motherboard is compatible is anyone's guess...no one will let you try it first. Not all modern motherboards will run Linux as I have found out.
What motherboards do company's like System 76 use or are they proprietary for System 76 exclusively.
 
Currently not sure, in the past, MSI & HP were quite common
 
I've never been so frustrated in all my life...the motherboards Condobloke gave me are all superseded...B450 was replaced by B550.

I rang Gigabyte Australia and asked what motherboards are compatible with Linux...they said "we don't give out that information"...what a bloody joke...they don't even check and I would say the same for them all. I rang a few computer shops by none want to know or care about Linux.

I don't buy old or second hand parts or refurbished computers as this is a waste of good money...so what motherboard is compatible is anyone's guess...no one will let you try it first. Not all modern motherboards will run Linux as I have found out. It was suggested on a new motherboard install windowz and run Linux as a VM...might be my only option but I'll have to think about that. :mad:
I would not put any faith in the local PC shop, Bob. i still think that motherboard would run Linux.....I see the problem being the techs there......they either don't care or don't know....maybe both

Just to put it in a nutshell. Linux.org has 63000 members. each one of them has a pc of some sort. Every single one of them runs Linux.
SO, the odds of a motherboard just not running Linux at all are very tiny.

The motherboard in my tower, is an ASRock. if I ring and ask them do they support Linux....the answer will be NO.
And yet, it runs like an absolute charm.
i have had a few 'moments' with it becasue I expected that asrock would give me support to update the bios etc.
They told me to "install windows 10, and update it there"....that is fact

The real problem is litigation. They are all afraid that if they say..."yeah, its ok mate...it'll run Linux with no dramas
....and for whatever reason it does not happen...(probably the inability of the 'tech' concerned to get the thing to work).....they will get the pants sued off them !!!
So they shut up.
The rotten so and so's KNOW full well that their motherboard will run Linux......they are just too caught up in the windows crap to say so.

Is there a Linux User Group anywhere near you?
 
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.....I see the problem being the techs there......they either don't care or don't know....maybe both
I Agree.
The local mom and pop computer store that's in my neighborhood has been there for at least 20 years.
The owner told me people ask for Windows computers and Apple computers not Linux computers.
 
The motherboard in my tower, is an ASRock. if I ring and ask them do they support Linux....the answer will be NO.
And yet, it runs like an absolute charm.
i have had a few 'moments' with it becasue I expected that asrock would give me support to update the bios etc.
They told me to "install windows 10, and update it there"....that is fact
Fact of the matter is that any x86_64 compatible mobo will run Linux. Period.

These companies all "guarantee" their products work with Windows for one simple reason, and it's not litigation (well, not primarily). It's all to do with the Windows certification process.

Microsoft are the biggest & best-known software vendor on the planet. Due to a LOT of extremely shady 'under-the-counter' legal & financial shenanigans back in the mid/late 90s and early 2000s, they've managed to 'encourage' a lot of manufacturers (read: twist a lot of arms behind backs!) to put their products first, in every way.

Be that as it may, these companies know one thing; if they get official 'approval' for their own products from Microsoft, they've got it made. They're on the gravy-train for life.....or at least for as long as Microsoft continue to exist and dominate the market as they do.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
As for flashing/updating your BIOS? Forget what these Windows-only companies tell you..! When I upgraded my old Compaq tower back in 2015, to add support for the move from a single-core Athlon 64 3200+ to a dual-core Athlon 64 X2 3800+, we flashed the BIOS in Puppy.

Look in your repos for the flashrom utility. I know this used to work with MBR BIOS on the old Winbond ROM chips; I don't know about the more modern UEFI, but I do know there's an extremely comprehensive article on the Arch wiki.......all about exactly how to use 'flashrom' to best effect. Yup, here we are:-

https://wiki.archlinux.org/title/Flashing_BIOS_from_Linux#Flashrom

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flashrom_(utility)

Back when I still had the very elderly Inspiron, and switched CPUs from a Celeron to a 'proper' P4, there was once a site called bay-wolf.com. No point looking for it now, because the servers went down when the domain expired some 5 or 6 years back.......but these guys used to provide BIOS upgrades for Dell laptops in the form of an ISO file. Burn it to CD; boot from that CD, and follow the very simple instructions. Barely 60 seconds later.....Bob's your mother's brother; all done!

Didn't matter what OS you ran, this all happened at firmware level; completely independent of your operating system, in fact before the OS even got around to booting. Simplest firmware upgrade I ever did in my life, from A06 up to A18.

There's more than one way to skin a cat. I will give Windows-centric companies one thing; they know that the vast majority of their users are NOT 'tech-savvy', so they go out of their way to make everything as simple to use as they can. All this stuff CAN be performed under Linux, though it's often a bit more fiddly.......yet there WILL be plenty of documentation, if you know where to look.


Mike. ;)
 
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@Condobloke :-

It's more or less the same tale with Epson, Brian. You ring up their Customer Support department and ask them straight out if they do drivers for Linux, they will tell you to your face "No, we ONLY support Windows and Apple." BUT:-

.....if you know the place to go - and it ain't the main website, I'll tell you now! - Epson maintain all their Linux drivers in one huge repository (and there's a lot of them). Their Linux stuff all used to be developed & maintained for them by another Japanese company called Avasys. When Avasys pulled the plug & went under, several years ago, Epson quietly absorbed this huge repository. No, they don't try to stop folks from downloading/using the stuff contained within.......but they don't go out of their way to advertise it, either!

There MAY be a link to it, somewhere on the main Epson website, but I've yet to find it. Folks looking for Epson printer drivers usually find out about this repo by word of mouth, on fora, OR via obscure links on sites like openprinting.org. I will say this; their Linux drivers are just as functional as their Windows counterparts, but they're one hell of a lot smaller.......which goes to show just how much unnecessary, largely pointless "bloatware" Windows users get lumbered with.


Mike. ;)
 
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