Installed Xubuntu 22.04, some observations/questions

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Not bad all in all, except some minor annoyances.
Had to run the update to get the wifi driver, so had to tether a device. Shouldn't have to do that. They need to fix it.

Questions:

How do I modify windows to point-to-raise instead of click-to-raise?
To resize a window, the border area to grab is tiniest I've ever seen, any way to increase that? Meaning the side of it or the bottom right corner.

Is there any way to access settings without having to go into the menu, like pin Settings or create an icon. It's tedious always having to go to the menu.

How do I add a desktop switcher, meaning I want to have 1x4 virtual desktops and switch between either using the switching tool or Control-right-arrow. This is the XFCE manager, it looks like they made some changes to it since I used it last.

Also I configured LVM during the install but instead of giving the choice of setting partition (LVOL) sizes, it created just one LVOL and put everything in it. To be completely honest, I don't dislike it. It's simple to manage for sure. But I always configured LVOLs as such, /var got 200GB, /home got 100GB, /usr got 400GB ... created some extra work with no apparent benefit.

Code:
# /usr/sbin/lvmdiskscan  | grep LVM
  /dev/sdb2      [      <1.82 TiB] LVM physical volume
  0 LVM physical volume whole disks
  1 LVM physical volume


# pvs
  PV         VG        Fmt  Attr PSize  PFree
  /dev/sdb2  vgxubuntu lvm2 a--  <1.82t    0

# vgs
  VG        #PV #LV #SN Attr   VSize  VFree
  vgxubuntu   1   2   0 wz--n- <1.82t    0

# lvs
  LV     VG        Attr       LSize  Pool Origin Data%  Meta%  Move Log Cpy%Sync Convert
  root   vgxubuntu -wi-ao---- <1.82t                                                   
  swap_1 vgxubuntu -wi-ao---- <1.91g
 
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Not bad all in all, except some minor annoyances.
Had to run the update to get the wifi driver, so had to tether a device. Shouldn't have to do that. They need to fix it.

Comment (FYI) only.

I see only mention of Xubuntu 22.04 LTS, but no specifics as to what/which you actually installed.

22.04 is a LTS, and Xubuntu being a flavor offers kernel stack choice; the GA kernel stack (ie. 5.15) being used if you install with 22.04 or 22.04.1 media; where as 22.04.2 & later media use the HWE kernel stack.

22.04.2 used the the 5.19 kernel; 22.04.3 used the 6.2, 22.04.3 used the 6.5 kernel, where if you used older media (and not the latest) you'll need to update/upgrade packages to get the latest as the media itself is older.

Ubuntu media will only include certain kernel modules; Xubuntu & Lubuntu offer fewer extras as compared to Ubuntu Desktop for example (with the others available post-install time via download) which helps keep the ISOs smaller.

Questions:

How do I modify windows to point-to-raise instead of click-to-raise?
To resize a window, the border area to grab is tiniest I've ever seen, any way to increase that? Meaning the side of it or the bottom right corner.

Is there any way to access settings without having to go into the menu, like pin Settings or create an icon. It's tedious always having to go to the menu.

How do I add a desktop switcher, meaning I want to have 1x4 virtual desktops and switch between either using the switching tool or Control-right-arrow. This is the XFCE manager, it looks like they made some changes to it since I used it last.

Also I configured LVM during the install but instead of giving the choice of setting partition (LVOL) sizes, it created just one LVOL and put everything in it. To be completely honest, I don't dislike it. It's simple to manage for sure. But I always configured LVOLs as such, /var got 200GB, /home got 100GB, /usr got 400GB ... created some extra work with no apparent benefit.

For the first point, why move your pointer to the exact corner; as you state it's somewhat tiny. Most of us just get it somewhat near a corner and then hold down the (R) ALT key & drag the window to where we want it to be... ie. we're too lazy to actually find the corner ... (Do note the window being dragged will be the window the pointer is inside)

I rarely access the menu; I'm using Xubuntu/Xfce currently on my Ubuntu noble box, and my install has a number of panels on it; one is setup to act somewhat like the Ubuntu Unity desktop included; where I'll provide a picture link here. Whilst the link I've provided is when I'm using LXQt/Lubuntu, I actually created that to mimic what I originally created here on the Xfce/Xubuntu I'm using currently (on Xfce it's not full height on that monitor as Xfce allows me configuration & thus I often have multiple panels on the side of my monitors (I have 5 now where the Lubuntu post shows only 2)).

For me I'd go into PANEL PREFERENCEs, and ADD a Launcher and then populate it with each of the various apps I use. I actually have 9 panels configured on my current 5 screens; all setup to work in a means that I consider suits what I do.

There are other alternate ways to achieve this, it's just what I prefer.

You also mention Workspaces. I have 5 configured on this current box as I really love them, the default for many Xubuntu releases is 1 (thus in effect they're disabled), but if you don't like the default just change it to more than 1 and the feature(s) will be enabled. You'll find Workspaces in the Settings of Xfce/Xubuntu.

Sorry if I've missed what you're asking, its what I read anyway.
 
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I would say that if I remember right (Which is not always the case. As I have not used xubuntu in awhile.) There is a panel plugin in the repository that will do the virtual desktops for you. But since I don't have it in front of me may be wrong. Cheers.

There are other distros that in my opinion do XFCE better. Including Debian,Lite, MX, and PCLinuxOS.
 
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Also I configured LVM during the install but instead of giving the choice of setting partition (LVOL) sizes, it created just one LVOL and put everything in it. To be completely honest, I don't dislike it. It's simple to manage for sure. But I always configured LVOLs as such, /var got 200GB, /home got 100GB, /usr got 400GB ... created some extra work with no apparent benefit.
You can either create them before you install from the terminal yourself before you install and then select during the installation process (I think but I haven't recently tried it) or you can use Fedora where you can create your own lvm partition setup during installation. For a desktop system using separate volumes for /var /usr, /opt etc. is overkill, only thing useful now days is to have on a separate volume is /home, on a server it is still quite useful to have those volumes on separate volumes.
 
For the first point, why move your pointer to the exact corner; as you state it's somewhat tiny. Most of us just get it somewhat near a corner and then hold down the (R) ALT key & drag the window to where we want it to be... ie. we're too lazy to actually find the corner ... (Do note the window being dragged will be the window the pointer is inside)

I have no idea what you are talking about here.
I am not going to use both keyboard and a mouse to achieve something that simple. The distro, whoever owns it, needs to increase the edge area/whatever it's called so it's easier to resize/drag.
I work daily with multiple distros, mainly the Redhat tree (not by choice) and they have no such issues. XFCE seems went out of its way to make things tiny.
Also the right upper corner of a window, the minimize/full screen and close icons are tiniest, could make these bigger as well.
Don't get the trend to make things tiny until you need a microscope to view them.
I am just constantly amazed why people suggest ways to work around bugs whereas the correct way is just fix the bugs.
It's not a deal breaker but if something becomes a major annoyance, the solution is just to reinstall and go with another distro.
I am running 22.04.04 now.
Buntu flavors seem to be more dominant in the user market vs the Redhat tree which has its own long set of bugs/annoyances.


I rarely access the menu; I'm using Xubuntu/Xfce currently on my Ubuntu noble box, and my install has a number of panels on it; one is setup to act somewhat like the Ubuntu Unity desktop included; where I'll provide a picture link here. Whilst the link I've provided is when I'm using LXQt/Lubuntu, I actually created that to mimic what I originally created here on the Xfce/Xubuntu I'm using currently (on Xfce it's not full height on that monitor as Xfce allows me configuration & thus I often have multiple panels on the side of my monitors (I have 5 now where the Lubuntu post shows only 2)).

For me I'd go into PANEL PREFERENCEs, and ADD a Launcher and then populate it with each of the various apps I use. I actually have 9 panels configured on my current 5 screens; all setup to work in a means that I consider suits what I do.
I added some aftermarket apps, got the panel to look more or less the way I like. Added the switcher and 4 virtual desktops/workspaces. Switching between them with Control-> and such. Nice.

I just found this new and interesting bug.
I have two external monitors with my MSI GT80 box. Del 43" and a Dell 32", both 4K. They both work. However, the 43" just cannot be made the primary monitor. The Display settings show that it's primary but it's not showing so on the screen. The 32" on the far left is primary. However, if I move the 32" under the 43" in the Display configuration, then 43" can be made primary and acts like it. Weird.
All in all, not bad these minor things notwithstanding.


 
You can either create them before you install from the terminal yourself before you install and then select during the installation process (I think but I haven't recently tried it)
No idea what you mean here. What terminal? Yeah, during Buntu install phase you can define your own partitions but there is no way not to allocate the entire SSD, 100%. It's called SSD provisioning, typically you want to leave 10-20% of the SSD unused to prolong longevity. An issue which did not exist in the HDD days. So the typical Buntu install does not accommodate SSD provisioning.
I want to use the LVM and I want to partition my own way and I do not want to use the entire disk. It's impossible to meet all 3 conditions, which aren't all that complicated during the install. You have to jump hoops, like create a part in Gparted or Windows, or something and then the install will not touch it as far as I can tell.

or you can use Fedora where you can create your own lvm partition setup during installation. For a desktop system using separate volumes for /var /usr, /opt etc. is overkill, only thing useful now days is to have on a separate volume is /home, on a server it is still quite useful to have those volumes on separate volumes.

Using Fedora... to create LVM partition. Yeah, I know, I have been doing it for a long time. I have been and still am married to the Redhat branch. Redhat, Oracle Linux, Rocky Linux.

I am wondering why Buntu can't do it.
I need to replicate my work environment. Where it's a requirement to have separate /tmp and /var/log and such. Plus I do not want to use the entire 2TB SSD for the install. I ended up installing Xubuntu 22.04.04 on a 1TB SSD, then used the wondeful Clonezilla tool to clone it to the 2TB SSD. Then use gparted to create a 1TB partition for a container. After I did all this, I realized I forgot to configure LVM to have separate LVOLs (usr, var, tmp, home, root, etc.). Oh well, think I will just live with it, until the next install.
At least I got the basic LVM commands set which is important.
And encrypted the system during the install.
 
I would say that if I remember right (Which is not always the case. As I have not used xubuntu in awhile.) There is a panel plugin in the repository that will do the virtual desktops for you. But since I don't have it in front of me may be wrong. Cheers.

There are other distros that in my opinion do XFCE better. Including Debian,Lite, MX, and PCLinuxOS.

I am kind of married to Ubuntu 22.04, Redhat 8 and OL9.3 <sigh> and anything I install has to be in that realm.
 
I do not have the issues you mentioned in Fedora. Maybe if you are such a redhat person you should use Fedora that way you have no issues replicating your work environment from Redhat. Sometimes simple works better than fix.
 
I am not going to use both keyboard and a mouse to achieve something that simple. The distro, whoever owns it, needs to increase the edge area/whatever it's called so it's easier to resize/drag.
Alas that desktop (and many others) have it work that way..

I'm regularly switching between desktops, using LXQt right now, and that method of adjusting window dimensions works here and in many desktops, being a common POSIX desktop feature (more a WM feature really over DE). Further on some; it allows you to adjust the window size of a background-window (without making it active & come to the front too).

If you're not happy with the WM, you can always change it.
 
The distro, whoever owns it, needs to increase the edge area/whatever it's called so it's easier to resize/drag.

... and have you let them know that?

Wizard
 
No idea what you mean here. What terminal? Yeah, during Buntu install phase you can define your own partitions but there is no way not to allocate the entire SSD, 100%
Because their installer doesn't support it. Before starting the installer you can live boot with any distribution and manually setup your custom lvm setup by using terminal commands. After which you can start the installer and just select those during the partition phase, but it seems Ubuntu has a gui for that too but not sure if that still works.
 
1.
How do I modify windows to point-to-raise instead of click-to-raise?

Try explaining a little more what you mean by this, please.

2.
To resize a window, the border area to grab is tiniest I've ever seen, any way to increase that? Meaning the side of it or the bottom right corner.

3.
Is there any way to access settings without having to go into the menu, like pin Settings or create an icon. It's tedious always having to go to the menu.

Two parts to set this up -
i. Right-click an empty spot on your Desktop, then choose Desktop Settings... (defaults to Background) then choose Menus and check under Desktop Menu - Include applications menu on desktop and any other options you want there.

ii. Return to desktop and right-click, you now have Applications Menu there, click and 3rd from top maybe is Settings Manager. Drag that to your panel right beside its last icon and drop, a popup window will appear to create a Launcher.

If performed correctly, you will now have an icon for Settings Manager on your Panel.

I invite you to try working out the Workspaces function, it is not rocket science. Just a case of taking the time and effort to look around the distro you have chosen.

Wizard
 


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