How is Using Debian Different from Using Ubuntu Derivatives

Della

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Myself an intermediate level linux user, working mostly on Ubuntu and derivatives from Mint to Feren OS etc. Now, we hear those distributions are based on Ubuntu and Ubuntu is based on Debian. When I use Mint or Feren, there is no difference beyond the surface, all the commands, default paths etc. are same with Ubuntu, and also all the drivers. Is it same for Debian as well then? If I download Debian will it come with a desktop environment that I can start using right off the bat like Mint and use the same drivers? I am using NVIDIA graphics card with CuDNN, so how does that (and other common desktop applications that one runs on Ubuntu) work with Debian?

I know for once the package managers and some of the commands/filenames are different in Manjaro which I tried for a while. But will there be a learning curve migrating from Mint to Debian?
 


captain-sensible

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One learning curve would be if you downloaded Debian iso that did not contain :none free" then you would find that your wifi didn't work , because "none free" doesn't contain the drivers.

By none free they mean proprietary Drivers classed as none free meaning in the context of GNU free .

Some Debian iso are here: https://cdimage.debian.org/images/u...rmware/10.10.0-live+nonfree/amd64/iso-hybrid/

That list of iso does contain the wifi drivers you need and so has "none free" in the name

You can choose your flavour of Desktop and iso hybrid iso will boot from usb stick.

There are some differences between Mint Ubuntu and Debian but you would really need one those users to tell you the difference. if you go for live you can boot OS from a usb, play with it and can still install via, install icon on Desktop of booted OS


if you have the basics of Mint and ubuntu under your belt- i can't see any major learning curve.
 
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brickwizard

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there are two main basis for Debian, Debian testing and Debian stable, unless you are good to excellent with the terminal and building your own packages, then steer clear of anything based on Debian Testing, Debian stable is the basis of Ubuntu who add various tweaks to the Debian base and then stick a choice of gui's on top ,Mint takes the Ubuntu with all the tweaks and re-work it to produce their own desktop build, [ Mint have in recent years issued a build based directly on Debian stable]
It is not uncommon for Debian based distro's to run a little quicker than those with Ubuntu base,
Myself I have a mix Mint 20 on my desktop, MX-linux on my main lappy [Debian based] and peppermint re-spin [32bit Ubuntu base] on my 2008 netbook
to be honest as just a user I found getting use to the MX desktop took a few days, but in the way they perform [apart from speed] there is little difference

Bwiz
 
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wizardfromoz

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and so has "none free" in the name
Just a point of semantics - that is "non-free", as Andy's link shows. :)

I found 4 years ago that it was the best option to ensure my wifi worked, as I seldom use Ethernet.

How does Ubuntu differ from Debian?
Nice link, @f33dm3bits :)

BUT

(Wizard's but usually follows close behind him)

They should have included in the section marked Packages, more about the PPA restrictions under Debian.

@Della - if you are familiar with PPAs (Personal Package Archives) for installing software from outside your Repositories, Debian does not allow that by default.

You first have to install a package called software-properties-common, and then you can use the PPA references.

Friday here in Oz so all

Avagudweegend

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz

BTW

If I download Debian will it come with a desktop environment that I can start using right off the bat like Mint...
Take a look at distrowatch.com - Debian for the 22 DEs (Desktop Environments) available to Debian.
 

brickwizard

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If I download Debian will it come with a desktop environment that I can start using right off the bat like Mint
Yes there are many Debian based distros that include GUI, MX linux, Mint LMDE4,Sparky,Deepin, Anti-X. just to name a few
 

kc1di

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Debian stable is a rock solid release. But that being said it's package base is somewhat dated. One of the biggest Difference from it and say Mint or Ubuntu is that both mint and ubuntu offer updated packages that are easily installed. Where in order to install the latest package on Debian you may have jump through a bunch of hoops to get all the dependencies etc you'll need to run the newer package. Mint and Ubuntu do not test their updates a thoroughly as Debian does before releasing them. MX is closer to Debian than say Ubuntu or Mint. So if stability is your main thing Debian would be the better choice. If on the other hand you require newer/ updated programs Ubuntu or Mint may be better. For instance if you want the latest gnome desktop you won't get that with debian without alot of work. thus ubuntu would be the better choice in that case. Only the op can answer the question what works better for me. Debian is solid will be supported for a long time, but more outdated than those distros base upon it.
 

Lord Boltar

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Ubuntu uses proprietary software while Debian uses mostly free software- you have to add the non-free Debian PPA to get this. Ubuntu releases have longer support and trends to be a lot more user friendly than Debian by taking advantage of proprietary software which is indifferent for new users who don’t care about the free software philosophy, like myself; on the other hand Ubuntu won’t be used by users who care about it. Debian is completely decentralized while Ubuntu has a company (Canonical) to back it.
 

Dot

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I know for once the package managers and some of the commands/filenames are different in Manjaro which I tried for a while. But will there be a learning curve migrating from Mint to Debian?
Manjaro is based on arch and ubuntu is based on debian so there are differences between manjaro and ubuntu
and yes debian will be a bit different but it's pretty stable and you can get used to it with a bit of usage
 

craigevil

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Debian Stable + backports is a good totally stable system.
Debian also has Testing and Unstable/Sid.

Personally I prefer Debian unstable + the Experimental repo.
Not quite as bleeding-edge as Arch/Manjaro, but close enough while still being more stable.

Debian uses the same package management system that Ubuntu/Mint use. I would also recommend installing gnome-software package along with synaptic. That gives you a couple of nice GUIs for pkg management. Of course if you know how to use apt you are good to go.
 

f33dm3bits

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Personally I prefer Debian unstable + the Experimental repo.
Not quite as bleeding-edge as Arch/Manjaro, but close enough while still being more stable.
Bleeding edge software isn't the same as unstable, I have been running Arch for almost two years now on my desktop and I've never had my system break. With bleeding edge you get the latest software which means you get more updates which means that the chances are higher that something might break. Unstable is software that is still in Alpha or Beta phase of the release, I don't get why people seem to think that if you run a rolling release distribution that you are running an unstable distribution.
 
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