How do you download or install software?

YeahRight

Member
Hello... I'm curious how to install software? I have a vpn software that I would like to install and curious how it's done under Linux, thanks
 


arochester

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
What is the extension of the VPN file? (What does it say after the .?)

Is it a VPN that offers support? Do they have instructions about installing?
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
OK you're going to have to do this using the command terminal.




 
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YeahRight

Member
After I downloaded and try to follow the instruction in Teriminal I run the first command and I see E: Unable to locate package {/path/to ... I can see the software in my Download folder
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Have a look at the 2nd link and 3rd link on the how to install surfshark.

I've no experiance with vpn softwre or setting them up so not going to be of any help. :(
 
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arochester

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
What distro are you using?

The Debian/Ubuntu download provides a .deb

The easiest way with Debian/Ubuntu is to install Gdebi (Package Installer)
Code:
sudo apt install gdebi
and then install with Gdebi.
 

YeahRight

Member
What distro are you using?

The Debian/Ubuntu download provides a .deb

The easiest way with Debian/Ubuntu is to install Gdebi (Package Installer)
Code:
sudo apt install gdebi
and then install with Gdebi.
I'm using Mint Cinnamon 19.2 ... What is Gdebi and what will it do? Thanks
 

YeahRight

Member
Have a look at the 2nd link and 3rd link on the how to install surfshark.

I've no experiance with vpn softwre or setting them up so not going to be of any help. :(
The second link is what I already try doing and got the following above, the third link I don't have OpenVPN, or does that matter?
 

arochester

Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Gdebi is a Package Installer. It will take a .deb and install it/

OpenVPN is normally available from Repository.
Code:
sudo apt install openvpn
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
The second link is what I already try doing and got the following above, the third link I don't have OpenVPN, or does that matter?
I'm uncertain but you may need to install OpenVPN.

Try it and see if it makes a difference.

arochester is correct OpenVPN is in the Repository.

Open the terminal and copy and paste this command in the terminal and press enter and then enter your password when ask and press enter again.

sudo apt install openvpn
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Follow these steps.


You may need to set up a sharksurf account first according to the how to in the above link.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Excellent and good job.
https://rlv.zcache.com/thumbs_up_emoji_shirts_stuff_postcard-r9071f1287456491aa7c4cec922e626e8_vgbaq_8byvr_324.jpg
 

YeahRight

Member
Thanks ... I'm curious about where the guide is for how to install software? Like how I had to do with this vpn software
 
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poorguy

Well-Known Member
Thanks ... I'm curious about where the guide is for how to install software? Like how I had to do with this vpn software
Hmm good question.

I've found it best to jump in and get your hands dirty and learn by the seat of your pants.

You will learn the Linux how to as you are using Linux and search the forums there's a lot of how to available here on the Linux.org forum.

Learn to use Synaptic Package Manager as it is the best and it does a lot although it's not hard to use once you become familiar with it.

Perhaps one of the wiser ones here know where some user guides are located.

Have a look at the tutorial sections here on Linux.org and see what they may offer or create a thread and see what others have used and find useful.


I've found these useful.


 

YeahRight

Member
Thanks, Poorguy, maybe I didn't make my question clear ... When it comes to installing software its not like how one does with windows just download and extract it or is it? Is Synaptic Package Manager how one gets the software? The whole software method with installing onto a Linux system isn't like windows? Now that I got this VPN software working there no icon anywhere is this normal? Thnanks
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member

I use Synaptic Package Manager and search for the software I'm wanting to install.

Sometimes it takes a bit to find what I'm looking for providing that it is in the Linux repository.

Most software that is needed is for the most in the Linux repository of the Linux distro being used.

It is best to use software from the Linux repository's as it is secure and tested to work for the most.

If and when it isn't than if you know what software you are wanting then you can go to the website of the software you want and see if a deb package is offered for Linux.

Linux
also uses what is known as PPA software.

Usually the software you download and install doesn't install a desktop icon as Linux considers desktop icons as unsecure although I don't understand why.

I hope this helps to explain but to be honest I suck at explaining things by typing them on a keyboard.
 
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atanere

Well-Known Member
I have a vpn software that I would like to install and curious how it's done under Linux
When you first asked, it sounded like you probably wanted to install Windows software... either an .exe or .msi file.... that you previously used. But as you have now learned, that is not how Linux works. There is only one way to use .exe or .msi installers, but it should be a last resort, not a first choice.... and it would need a whole new thread of it's own. (Or you can Google for "using Wine in Linux" to learn more).

Linux has MANY ways of installing software. Here are the most common:
1. Software Manager (Linux Mint has one)
2. Synaptic Package manager (also in Linux Mint)
3. Install from terminal, like sudo apt install gdebi
4. Install from pre-packaged .deb files (run the code above to install gdebi so you can do this)
5. Compile new software from source code, just like a programmer. It's easy (sometimes).

While I'm typing this, I see Tom (@poorguy) has mentioned above about PPA's too.... but those are more for specialty software than the standard items in Software Manager, or PPA's can also provide a newer version than what is stored in a distro's repositories. Linux Mint and Ubuntu use PPA's, but many other distros do not, so if you start distro-hopping you may lose this ability.

Linux Mint does have a User Manual that would be good for you to go through. It's a bit outdated at Cinnamon version 18, but it would still be helpful. It's available as PDF in English and many other languages, although other languages are sometimes a bit older than version 18.
 
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