Getting rid of some updates.

kingsX

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I use Linux Mint, 18.3 Sylvia, MATE.

I currently have around 60 updates in the update manager & i'm wondering if its possible to delete some of the updates from the manager or not?
I used to download every update more or less, however it seemed to me that not all updates were applicable to me & how i use the pc. There are also some updates that despite having descriptions i still don't know if i need to download them or not?
I am not very computer savvy at all, i've tried to learn more but it doesn't sink in too much i'm afraid.

For example, I currently have some updates to do with Python. How does one find out whether they are even using Python in the first place?

I find it hard to believe that there doesn't seem to be a way to delete updates from the manager, surely not ALL updates are needed? Spellchecker?

Thanks.
 


Condobloke

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Thumbs up to @arochester 's comment....it will not give you updates to programs you dont already have.

I also run Linux Mint 18.3 (Cinnamon)

On of the BIGGEST attractions of running Linux is that worrying about updates is Unnecessary/Finished/ relegated to windows users to pull their hair out over......

Take a mental step back....simply select all updates and click the button to let it do its thing.

I have been installing ALL updates for 5 years with no dramas

My only caveat/s here is that you should have Timeshift installed. This guards against any possible hiccup that may disturb the smooth flow of your LM ....and you can elect to ignore any Kernel updates. If your machine is running nicely, then a kernel update is probably unnecessary. I have been running the same kernel for 3 years without any ill effects.

Simple.....Really. You are meant to Enjoy Linux, not be a slave to it.

If you want to look at it another way....have a look on a windows forum and count the number of problems concerning updates....the number will be concerning/high

Then....have a search on this forum for problems concerning updates. Good luck finding any !

And lastly... Security.......whether you use any of the updated apps/programs is irrelevant. they are updated usually for security reasons........and you want that security. The updates of this nature are usually very small....they can be measured in bytes, not megabytes....so taking up space is not a concern either.
 
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jglen490

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Trying to be selective with security updates will leave your system less secure. Updates within the current version of Linux are solely for security reasons. There may be some functionality improvements within a particular app, just because the update is happening, but if there are no security fixes, there are no updates.
 

JasKinasis

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For example, I currently have some updates to do with Python. How does one find out whether they are even using Python in the first place?

I find it hard to believe that there doesn't seem to be a way to delete updates from the manager, surely not ALL updates are needed? Spellchecker?
I agree with everything the others have said. You should just pick up all of the updates. Most of the time, these updates will be important security updates. And yes, sometimes there are a lot of updates. But most of them are relatively small.

As @arochester said - it won't update things that you don't have installed.

And sometimes, you might have a few things that you yourself are not directly using, but which were brought in as dependencies of other things that were either part of the base-install, or that YOU have subsequently installed. So keeping these things up to date is important too.

Regarding the python question - python is installed by default on pretty much ALL Linux distros nowadays.
There are a lot of system scripts that use python. So even if you don't use python yourself - it's used behind the scenes by your system. So again, it's a good idea to keep it up to date.

If you try to uninstall python, you will almost certainly bork your system.
 

Vrai

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I use Linux Mint, 18.3 Sylvia, MATE.

I currently have around 60 updates in the update manager & i'm wondering if its possible to delete some of the updates from the manager or not?
I used to download every update more or less, however it seemed to me that not all updates were applicable to me & how i use the pc. There are also some updates that despite having descriptions i still don't know if i need to download them or not?
I am not very computer savvy at all, i've tried to learn more but it doesn't sink in too much i'm afraid.

For example, I currently have some updates to do with Python. How does one find out whether they are even using Python in the first place?

I find it hard to believe that there doesn't seem to be a way to delete updates from the manager, surely not ALL updates are needed? Spellchecker?

Thanks.
You do not have to install all the updates.
In Linux Mint 18.3 you can use the Update Manager to look at the "Changelog".
Check the changelog and if it is a "security" update I recommend installing it.
Other updates which may not apply to your hardware or do not affect your use case scenario you can ignore. Either by "un-checking" the update or by right clicking on it and choosing "Ignore for now" or "Ignore for always".
But again - I recommend installing all "security" updates.
 

jglen490

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Python is essential to Linux. All in-distro version updates ARE security updates. Some updates also include functional changes. Only those software units that are already in your system will receive updates, new additions will only be applied if they are required in support of something that already exists on your system.

That just about covers it.

And one more thing, you are free to remove applications that you do not want - just be careful about consequences.
 

jglen490

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Please elaborate!
 

kingsX

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Thanks for the replies.
I was reading this on the easy linux tips site, 'However (you're the boss!) this obnoxious feature can be found as follows: Menu button - Administration - Update Manager - panel: Edit - Preferences - tab Automation.'

When i click on Preferences i don't see a tab 'Automation, i can't find it! I want to turn on Automatic Maintenance, can anyone help please?
 

Condobloke

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There is no Automation on Linux Mint 18.3

Just click on the little blue dot, and type in your password. Minimize it to the taskbar and get on with whatever else you have to do.

You may find some joy HERE .....
 

wizardfromoz

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Right-hand side of the Tips Page

Only for Linux Mint 20.x and Ubuntu 20.04.x

The tips and how-to's on this website are only for Linux Mint 20.x and Ubuntu 20.04.x.
Cheers all

Wizard
 

sp331yi

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@kingsX -- what you're referring to is why I almost always do only a Base Install. Then, there are other options, as put forth in

How to install and upgrade debian packages selectively
which is speaking of pinning.

As said above by all, updates are necessary. One IS the boss. Simply be selective.


EDIT & NOTE: the author of the above refernced webpage is like me, at times, keyboard dyslexic, so the typos that should have been edited out are still there.

And for all users not using a true Debian distro (aka Mint and the 'buntus and many others) --
https://help.ubuntu.com/community/PinningHowto
 
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Nelson Muntz

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When my update notifier shows updates are available I just press enter and then enter my password and when finished do a restart and I'm good to go and have never had a problem.

sudo apt autoremove run from terminal is suppose to remove packages / software that is no longer needed or has been replaced with a newer updated version.
 



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