Download Mint Using a Torrent

Sherri is a Cat

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Linux Mint Cinnamon Edition has a link for a torrent download.

Beyond a fair understanding of what a torrent is, I'm not sure exactly what this is for, what it does, how to use it.

I'm re-downloading Mint. I don't want to wait all day. Is this torrent that can be used in Windows? Is it specifically for downloading Mint? Can I use my VPN (NordVPN) if I use this torrent?

I haven't used a torrent in a very long time. I'm a little lost here!

Thank you!


Torrent.JPG
 


Sherri, I seldom use torrents, and I am not aware of what is available to Windows. Someone else may come along with helpful information.

Other than that, scrolling down that page you will find 20 or more US sites you can choose from to download the regular way.

It should only take a few minutes if your download speeds are reasonable.

Cheers

Wizard
 
Sherri, I seldom use torrents, and I am not aware of what is available to Windows. Someone else may come along with helpful information.

Other than that, scrolling down that page you will find 20 or more US sites you can choose from to download the regular way.

It should only take a few minutes if your download speeds are reasonable.

Cheers

Wizard
It took about an hour last time. I live in the boonies.
 
Whoops - I'll leave it to the torrent experts to say whether torrent usage will likely improve on that. :)
 
It's much easier and quicker to use one of the download mirrors...the ISO will be downloaded to the Downloads folder.
m1213.gif


I don't torrent myself but If you must download the ISO as a torrent...click Torrent Download 64bit...this sends the file to be downloaded to your Downloads folder...open your Torrent Client and select the file and download it.
m1212.gif
 
I also use official Mirrors, I have tried torrent but on the occasions I did try the download quality was not the best and I had several corrupted efforts. [always a possibility when using P2P systems]
 
Torrent is slower than downloading from the servers. but it guarantee the integrity of the file in my experience. Use qbittorrent on Windows, it is free and open source, once you are in Linux you will have Transmission installed by default
 
Torrent download is fine

No need to use a vpn....an .iso file is not recognised as being "naughty", or infringing copyright in any way
give it a try...all it takes is a click or two....and you will soon see if it is slow or otherwise.
It is my experience that it is quicker than the mirrors....and it also guarantees the integrity...no need to check of verify the .iso

you will need a torrent client....qbittorrent is good. When you click on the 64 bit torrent to download it should find qbittorrent all on its own and start the download....either that or it will download a small file to wherever your downloads currently go (download folder?...or maybe desktop)......you would then double click on that small file and qbittorent should then 'see' it and start downloading it.
 
Sherri, further to the above - Linux Mint 21.1 'Vera' Cinnamon has available to it, in torrent clients
  • Deluge
  • qbittorrent
  • Transmission
  • and some others
but as @Terminal Velocity has said, Transmission is actually installed on Mint.

They are all also available to Windows, so perhaps trying Transmission will give you a choice that you can then get used to for the move to Linux.

You can get Transmission for your Windows at

https://transmissionbt.com/

Cheers

Wizard
 
The BitTorrent protocol is a method of sharing and downloading files in a distributed way. Instead of one big HTTP file download from a single server, different pieces of the file are downloaded concurrently from many different sources on the internet in any order. The pieces are reassembled into the final file (and integrity-checked) at the client computer that downloaded them.

Using torrents can reduce internet costs for the people with servers that host files for download by distributing the download workload to many servers, which may be volunteered by others, possibly without their knowledge. Torrents are also used as a method to avoid "takedowns" of copyrighted material by spreading many copies of the file among many servers, which may be contributed by volunteers. It expanded the availability of popular large files (such as bootleg movies) through an exponential growth of available servers to offer files and parts of files. Some bad guys use hacked home computers as torrent servers for their illegal or copyrighted products.

Using torrents can improve performance and reduce download times. The client can utilize the full potential of their internet connection by downloading pieces from many different servers at once, in situations where one server cannot keep up.

I do not use torrents because my internet connection is good enough for regular HTTP downloads (300 Mbits/sec download, 10 Mbits/sec upload). Besides, I do not feel like installing another application to handle the protocol. (Some of those torrent applications require that you contribute sharing (server) duties too. That ain't happenin' for me.)

Regardless of which protocol you use to download a Linux distro or other file, always confirm the checksum or digital signature on the file, check it for malware, or both. I do.
 
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