• We had to restore from a backup today after a failed software update. Backup was from 0000 EDT and restored it at 0800 EDT so we lost about 8hrs. Today is 07/20/2024. More info here.

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rb61153

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I removed 200gb from the home partition, and now am adding 200gb to the root sda1. settings : ext4 journaling, check the format the partition box, and set the mount point to “/“. sound correct?
 


I removed 200gb from the home partition, and now am adding 200gb to the root sda1. settings : ext4 journaling, check the format the partition box, and set the mount point to “/“. sound correct?
Hey dude! It sounds like you want to resize your partitions. If you removed 200GB from your home partition and want to add it to the root partition (sda1), there are a few steps you can take. First, make sure to back up your important data just in case anything goes south.

To add the 200GB to sda1, you'll need to follow these steps:

1. Open up a terminal and run sudo gparted to open the GParted partition editor.
2. In GParted, select the home partition and choose "Resize/Move."
3. Shrink the home partition by 200GB (you can enter the value or drag the slider).
4. Apply the changes to resize the partition.
5. Next, select the root partition (sda1) and choose "Resize/Move" once again.
6. Expand the root partition to utilize the free space you just created.
7. Apply the changes to resize the root partition.
8. Once the resize is complete, you should be good to go!

Make sure the format for the root partition (sda1) is set to ext4 with journaling enabled. Check the "Format the partition" box if it's not already selected. Also, set the mount point to "/" since it's the root partition.

Remember, always double-check your settings before applying any changes to avoid any accidental data loss. Good luck, dude!
 
been through all that in earlier thread. Can I delete sda1 “/“. and delete sda3 “/“ and start over. or should I go back a step and choose drlete and reinstall instead of something else?Reminder, this is a clean install so no data loss risk
 
been through all that in earlier thread. Can I delete sda1 “/“. and delete sda3 “/“ and start over. or should I go back a step and choose drlete and reinstall instead of something else?Reminder, this is a clean install so no data loss risk
Whoa, sorry if I misunderstood the situation in your previous thread, dude! If you're doing a clean install and there's no data loss risk, you have a couple of options.

If you want to start over completely, you can delete sda1 ("/") and sda3 ("/") and then create new partitions from scratch during the installation process. Just make sure to take note of any important settings or configurations you might have made before deleting those partitions.

Alternatively, if you prefer a simpler approach, you can go back a step in the installation process and choose the "Delete and reinstall" option. This will delete the existing partitions and reinstall the OS without much hassle. It's a quick way to start fresh while avoiding unnecessary complications.

Ultimately, the choice is yours, dude! Just make sure to back up any important data before going ahead with any partition deletion to be on the safe side. Good luck with your installation!
 
I chose delete and reinstall & am at the Install now. Will it give me the ability to size my partitions in the next step ?
 
I chose delete and reinstall & am at the Install now. Will it give me the ability to size my partitions in the next step ?
Right on, dude! Choosing the "Delete and reinstall" option was a good move. Once you've reached the "Install now" step, the next screen should give you the ability to size your partitions.

During the installation process, you'll typically come across a step where you need to select the installation type or partitioning method. Depending on the Linux distribution you're installing, you should see options like "Guided - use entire disk," "Manual partitioning," or something similar.

If you choose the "Manual partitioning" option, you'll have full control over the partition sizes and mount points. From there, you can create and resize partitions as needed. It's a great opportunity to define the sizes for your root ("/"), home ("/home"), and any other partitions you may need.

Be careful, though! Make sure to double-check your choices and take note of the mount points and file systems you select. Once you're satisfied with the partition sizes and configurations, proceed with the installation process.

If you're uncertain about any specific steps during the installation, feel free to ask for guidance, dude. Happy installing!
 
it went to select time zone and after I selected, it started installing without giving me sizing options. will that come later?
 
it went to select time zone and after I selected, it started installing without giving me sizing options. will that come later?
Hey, dude! It's a bit unusual that the installation process skipped the partition sizing options after selecting the time zone. In most Linux distributions, the partitioning step usually comes right after selecting the time zone.

If the installation process started without giving you the sizing options, it's possible that the installation is using a default partitioning scheme. In such cases, the installer automatically creates standard partitions based on predetermined sizes.

To ensure you have control over the partition sizes, you might want to consider doing a manual partitioning setup from scratch. This gives you the ability to define the sizes and mount points for each partition according to your preferences.

If you're unable to access the manual partitioning option during the installation, you may need to restart the installation process and choose the "Manual partitioning" or "Custom partitioning" option right from the start.

Remember, it's crucial to be cautious when modifying partitions, especially if you have existing data on the disk. Backing up important data is always a wise move before embarking on such changes.

If you encounter any specific issues during the installation, feel free to ask for further assistance, dude. Good luck, and I hope you get your partitions set up just the way you want!
 
the install completed, and I chose “continue testing” instead of “restart”. The partition sizes it used were not what i needed, so I tried to start at Install Linux Mint again & it threw an error. Do I need to restart and select my usb stick as the boot sector and start over?
 
the install completed, and I chose “continue testing” instead of “restart”. The partition sizes it used were not what i needed, so I tried to start at Install Linux Mint again & it threw an error. Do I need to restart and select my usb stick as the boot sector and start over?
Bummer, dude! If you're encountering an error when trying to start the installation process again, it might be worth restarting your system and selecting your USB stick as the boot device. This way, you can start fresh and ensure that the partition sizes are set up correctly.

To do this:
1. Restart your computer.
2. During the startup process, access the BIOS or UEFI settings. The specific key to press (like F2 or Delete) varies depending on your computer manufacturer.
3. Once in the BIOS or UEFI settings, navigate to the boot order options.
4. Move the USB stick to the top of the boot order or select it as the primary boot device.
5. Save the changes and exit the BIOS or UEFI settings.
6. Your computer will then boot from the USB stick and you can start the installation process again.

This time, pay attention to the manual partitioning step and make sure to set the partition sizes to meet your needs. Take your time and double-check your choices before proceeding with the installation.

If you continue to experience errors or encounter any other issues, don't hesitate to reach out for further assistance. Good luck, and I hope you get your Linux Mint installation up and running smoothly soon!
 
when i went back into installation, it had changed my partition name from sda to sdb. so I will delete all sdbx partitions except /dev/sdb and revset them up with the correct sizes. correct?
 
when i went back into installation, it had changed my partition name from sda to sdb. so I will delete all sdbx partitions except /dev/sdb and revset them up with the correct sizes. correct?
Whoa, that's an unexpected change, dude! If your partition names have changed from sda to sdb, it means that there may be a difference in the device naming or order. Deleting the unnecessary sdbx partitions and setting them up with the correct sizes sounds like a solid plan to get things back on track.

Here's what you can do:

1. Open up the partition manager or disk utility tool (like GParted) to manage your partitions.
2. Identify the sdbx partitions that you want to delete, keeping in mind that you only want to retain /dev/sdb as your main disk.
3. Delete all the unwanted sdbx partitions, making sure not to delete the primary /dev/sdb partition.
4. Once the unnecessary partitions are deleted, recreate the partitions with the correct sizes according to your needs.
5. Ensure that the partition names and mount points (like /, /home, etc.) are set correctly.
6. Review your partition changes carefully to avoid any accidental data loss.
7. Once you're satisfied with the partition setup, you can proceed with the installation process again, making sure to select the correct partitions during the installation.

Remember, it's always a good idea to back up any important data before making any changes to your partitions, just in case anything goes awry.

If you need further guidance or encounter any issues along the way, feel free to ask for help, dude. Good luck with setting up your partitions correctly!
 
In Installation Type window, I highlighted /dev/sdb and the + sign is grayed out , so I chose “New partition table”. A message -“ you have selected an entire device to partition. If you proceed with creatinga new partition table on tge device then all current partitions will be removed”. is this ok?
 
In Installation Type window, I highlighted /dev/sdb and the + sign is grayed out , so I chose “New partition table”. A message -“ you have selected an entire device to partition. If you proceed with creatinga new partition table on tge device then all current partitions will be removed”. is this ok?
Whoa, that message is letting you know that selecting "New partition table" will erase all current partitions on the /dev/sdb device. If you're okay with that and you've already backed up any important data, then it's safe to proceed.

By choosing "New partition table," you'll be starting with a clean slate on /dev/sdb, allowing you to set up new partitions and sizes according to your preferences.

Just make sure you're absolutely certain about erasing all existing partitions on /dev/sdb before proceeding. Take a moment to review your data backup, and if you're ready to move forward with the fresh partition table, go ahead and confirm the action.

Remember, this will remove all current partitions on /dev/sdb, so double-check that you have a proper backup of any important data.

If you have any further doubts or need additional assistance during the installation, feel free to ask, dude. Good luck with setting up your new partition table!
 
ok i set up a large 250gb root at beginning of soace. and am allocating the remainder of the 2tb to /home. Does it matter if I leave /home at “ beginning of this space” or change it to “ end of this space”?
 
ok i set up a large 250gb root at beginning of soace. and am allocating the remainder of the 2tb to /home. Does it matter if I leave /home at “ beginning of this space” or change it to “ end of this space”?
Dude, that sounds like a solid plan! Allocating a large 250GB partition for root ("/") at the beginning of the space and using the remaining 2TB for "/home" is a great way to set up your partitions.

Regarding the location of the "/home" partition within the available space, it doesn't really matter whether you choose to set it at the "beginning of this space" or the "end of this space." It won't affect the functionality of your system or performance.

The decision to position "/home" at the beginning or end typically depends on personal preference or specific requirements. Some users prefer to have it at the beginning for easier management and separation from the root partition, while others prefer to have it at the end to allow for future partitions or expansion.

In the end, it's up to you, dude! Choose the option that you feel most comfortable with and that aligns with your needs. As long as you've set up your root ("/") and "/home" partitions with the sizes you want, you're good to go!

If you have any more questions or need further assistance, feel free to ask. Enjoy setting up your Linux system just the way you want it!
 

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