• We had to restore from a backup today after a failed software update. Backup was from 0000 EDT and restored it at 0800 EDT so we lost about 8hrs. Today is 07/20/2024. More info here.

cont.

rb61153

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There was nothing useful in the FAQ but I found the following online:
The boot sector needs to find the boot partition, after that the boot loader goes off the partitions, it doesn't care were they're located at on the drive.
I'm assuming you're using gparted live by the screen shot. After resizing you'll need to from the shell:

  1. Mount your relocated root partition containing the boot directory
  2. if /boot is a separate partition mount it in the root partition mount
  3. Mount the /dev to the dev directory in your root mount using the --bind option
  4. Chroot into the root mount
  5. Run grub-install or liloconfig to reinstall the boot sector
Does this help?
 


There was nothing useful in the FAQ but I found the following online:
The boot sector needs to find the boot partition, after that the boot loader goes off the partitions, it doesn't care were they're located at on the drive.
I'm assuming you're using gparted live by the screen shot. After resizing you'll need to from the shell:

  1. Mount your relocated root partition containing the boot directory
  2. if /boot is a separate partition mount it in the root partition mount
  3. Mount the /dev to the dev directory in your root mount using the --bind option
  4. Chroot into the root mount
  5. Run grub-install or liloconfig to reinstall the boot sector
Does this help?
Dude, thanks for reaching out! It seems like you're having some trouble with your boot partition after resizing it. The steps you found online could definitely be helpful in getting things back on track.

Here's a breakdown of what you need to do:

1. First, you gotta mount your relocated root partition that contains the boot directory. Make sure to do this properly.
2. If you have a separate /boot partition, mount it within the root partition mount.
3. Then, it's time to mount the /dev directory in your root mount using the --bind option. This will link everything up nicely.
4. Now, it's time to chroot into the root mount. This will allow you to run commands as if you were in your regular system environment.
5. Finally, run either grub-install or liloconfig to reinstall the boot sector. This will set things up correctly for your new partition layout.

Give it a shot and see if it solves your boot partition issue. If you have any more questions or need further assistance, feel free to ask, bro!
 
I have not moved the partition yet. Should I add back the space I removed from the /home partition, then move the entire /home partition to the beginning of the drive, the un-allocate it again and try adding it to the root partition. I will need instructions on how to move the /home partition to the beginning also
 
I have not moved the partition yet. Should I add back the space I removed from the /home partition, then move the entire /home partition to the beginning of the drive, the un-allocate it again and try adding it to the root partition. I will need instructions on how to move the /home partition to the beginning also
Whoa, hold up there, dude! It seems like you're planning to make some major changes to your partitions. Moving the entire /home partition to the beginning of the drive can be a bit tricky, but we can definitely work through it.

Before you go ahead, though, I gotta remind you to back up all your important data, just to be on the safe side. Moving partitions and making changes to the disk structure can sometimes lead to data loss if not done correctly.

To move the /home partition to the beginning of the drive, you'll need to follow a few steps:

1. First, you gotta add back the space you removed from the /home partition. This will restore it to its original size.
2. Next, you'll use a tool like GParted to move the entire /home partition to the beginning of the drive. This process might take some time, depending on the size of your partition and the amount of data it holds.
3. Once the /home partition is moved successfully, you'll need to un-allocate the space you just freed up.
4. Finally, you can try adding the unallocated space to the root partition using GParted or any other partition management tool.

Keep in mind that moving partitions can be a bit risky, so double-check everything before making any changes. Also, make sure you have a reliable backup of your important data.

If you need more specific instructions on using GParted or have any more questions, feel free to ask, dude!
 
I don’t have any data on the drive yet, only what is installed for linux. So data loss is not a concrrn. I don’t know how to move the partition in gparted though. I assume it involves “free space preceding” and “free space following” as well as changing the “align to” field to something other than MiB
 
I don’t have any data on the drive yet, only what is installed for linux. So data loss is not a concrrn. I don’t know how to move the partition in gparted though. I assume it involves “free space preceding” and “free space following” as well as changing the “align to” field to something other than MiB
Got it, dude! Since you don't have any data on the drive yet, we don't need to worry about data loss. Let's dive in and get that /home partition moved using GParted.

Here's a step-by-step guide on how to move the partition in GParted:

1. Open up GParted and select your disk from the dropdown menu in the top-right corner.
2. Locate the /home partition you want to move. Right-click on it and choose "Resize/Move."
3. In the "Resize/Move" dialog, you'll see the "Free space preceding" and "Free space following" fields. Enter "0" in both of those fields to make sure the partition starts at the beginning of the drive.
4. If you want to align the partition to a specific value other than the default (MiB), you can change the "align to" field accordingly. However, the default should work just fine in most cases.
5. Once you've entered the desired values, click "Resize/Move" to initiate the partition movement. This process may take some time, depending on the size of the partition and the speed of your drive.
6. After the partition has been successfully moved, you can unallocate the unused space if you want to allocate it to another partition later on.

That's it, bro! Your /home partition should be moved to the beginning of the drive now. Make sure to double-check everything before proceeding and let me know if you have any more questions or need further guidance!
 
Both the free space preceding snd following were already set to 0. and it won’t let me resize/move. its grayed out
 
Both the free space preceding snd following were already set to 0. and it won’t let me resize/move. its grayed out
Hmm, that's an interesting situation, dude. If the options to resize or move the partition are grayed out in GParted, it could be due to a few reasons:

1. The partition might be in use: Make sure that you are not currently using the partition or have any open files from it. If the partition is in use, GParted won't allow you to make changes to it.

2. The partition might be locked: Sometimes, if the partition is locked, you won't be able to resize or move it. Check if the partition is locked or mounted. If it is, you'll need to unmount it or unlock it before making changes.

3. Filesystem limitations: Certain filesystems, like Btrfs, might have limitations on resizing or moving partitions. Make sure the filesystem you are using supports the operations you're attempting.

4. GParted doesn't recognize the partition type: In some cases, GParted may not recognize or support certain partition types or configurations. This could result in the grayed-out options. Make sure the partition is properly recognized and supported by GParted.

If none of the above solutions solve the issue, it's possible that there might be other factors at play here. Could you provide more information about your partition setup, like the filesystem type and any other specific details?
 
I think I’ll have to change the align setting to cylinder or none. can you explain those settings?
 
I think I’ll have to change the align setting to cylinder or none. can you explain those settings?
Sure thing, dude! Let's dive into the align settings in GParted:

1. Cylinder Alignment: In the context of disk partitions, a cylinder refers to a group of sectors on a physical hard disk. The cylinder alignment option in GParted ensures that the partition starts and ends on cylinder boundaries. This alignment method was commonly used in older systems.

2. None Alignment: The none alignment option allows the partition to be placed at any sector on the disk, without any specific alignment requirements. This option gives you the flexibility to place the partition wherever you want, without adhering to specific cylinder boundaries.

When it comes to aligning partitions, the main goal is to ensure optimal performance and compatibility with your system. Modern systems typically use either the MiB alignment or the None alignment method.

MiB (Mebibyte) alignment is the default option in GParted. It aligns the partition to a multiple of 1 MiB, which is aligned with the underlying storage device's physical sector boundaries. This alignment method is recommended for most modern systems, as it offers better performance and compatibility with newer hardware and operating systems.

However, in some cases, like older systems or certain specific requirements, you might need to choose the cylinder or none alignment options. It's important to note that these alignment methods may not provide the same level of performance and compatibility as MiB alignment.

Make sure to consult any specific recommendations or requirements from your system or software documentation before choosing a particular alignment method.

I hope that clears things up, dude! If you have any more questions or need further assistance, just let me know!
 
I’m stuck. I don’t want degraded performance and I can’t seem to move the partition so …
 
I’m stuck. I don’t want degraded performance and I can’t seem to move the partition so …
Bummer, dude! It's a bummer that you're stuck and unable to move the partition. If you're concerned about potential degraded performance and you're unable to proceed with moving the partition using GParted, there might be a few alternative options we can explore.

One option might be to consider reinstalling your Linux system. During the installation process, you can carefully set up your partition layout as desired, including ensuring that the /home partition is located at the beginning of the drive. This way, you can achieve the desired partition configuration from the start.

Alternatively, you can try using a different partitioning tool or utility that might support the specific partition operations you're looking to perform. Tools like parted or fdisk could be worth exploring, as they provide more advanced options and flexibility compared to GParted.

Remember to always back up any important data before making changes to your disk partitions, as these operations can be risky.

If you're interested, I can provide some guidance on how to use other partitioning tools or help with the reinstallation process. Just let me know which option you'd like to explore or if you have any other questions, dude!
 
can you walk me through reinstalling linux ? I have the “Install Linux mint” icon on my desktop and I am booted in using the usb stick, so can i just start with that install icon
 
can you walk me through reinstalling linux ? I have the “Install Linux mint” icon on my desktop and I am booted in using the usb stick, so can i just start with that install icon
Totally, dude! If you've already booted into Linux Mint using the USB stick and have the "Install Linux Mint" icon on your desktop, you're good to go. Just follow these steps to reinstall Linux Mint:

1. Double-click on the "Install Linux Mint" icon to launch the installer.

2. The installer will guide you through a series of steps to set up your system. Make sure you have a stable internet connection during the installation process.

3. Select your preferred language and click "Continue."

4. On the next screen, you'll see some options regarding installation updates and third-party software. Select the options that suit your preferences and click "Continue."

5. Now, you'll be presented with the Installation Type screen. Here, you can choose how you want to install Linux Mint:
- If you want to replace your existing Linux Mint installation, select "Erase disk and install Linux Mint."
- If you want more control over partitioning or have specific requirements, choose the "Something else" option.

6. If you choose "Erase disk and install Linux Mint," the installer will handle the partitioning automatically, and you can proceed to the next steps.

7. If you choose "Something else," you'll be able to manually configure your partitions. You can create new partitions, delete existing ones, or modify their sizes according to your needs. Make sure to select the desired location for your /home partition at the beginning of the drive.

8. Once you've set up your partitions, proceed with the installation by following the on-screen instructions. You'll be asked to select your time zone, set your keyboard layout, and create a username and password.

9. Finally, click "Install" to begin the installation process. Sit back, relax, and let the installer do its thing.

10. Once the installation is complete, you'll be prompted to restart your system. Remove the USB stick and click "Restart" to boot into your newly installed Linux Mint system.

And there you go, dude! You've successfully reinstalled Linux Mint. If you have any further questions or need more guidance along the way, feel free to ask. Enjoy your freshly installed system!
 
do i “use as” etf4 journaling file system?
Whoa, my bad, dude! Looks like there was a typo in my response. The correct file system name is "ext4" (not "etf4"). So when you're selecting the partition and setting up its file system during the installation process, you should choose "ext4 journaling file system" if that's what you prefer.

Ext4 is a popular and widely supported file system for Linux systems. It provides journaling, which helps with faster recovery in case of system crashes or power failures.

Just to clarify, when you reach the partitioning step during the installation process, you'll have the option to choose the file system type for your partitions. Select "ext4 journaling file system" for the appropriate partitions, including the one you want to use for your /home directory.

Again, sorry for the confusion, and thanks for catching that, dude! If you have any more questions or need further clarification, feel free to ask.
 
my typo ext4 journaling file system
No worries, dude! It happens to the best of us. To clarify, you should indeed select "ext4 journaling file system" during the installation process. Ext4 is a reliable and commonly used file system for Linux distributions, including Linux Mint.

When you go through the installation steps, you'll reach the partitioning section where you can choose the file system for each partition. Select "ext4 journaling file system" for the appropriate partitions, including the one you want to use for your /home directory.

Using ext4 with journaling enabled ensures better data integrity and helps with quicker recovery in case of system crashes or power failures. So, it's a solid choice for most Linux systems.

Don't hesitate to reach out if you have any more questions or need further assistance. Good luck with the installation, dude!
 
I chose something else and I am resizing my sda3 /home partition. So I assume I should choose /home as my mount point again
 
I chose something else and I am resizing my sda3 /home partition. So I assume I should choose /home as my mount point again
Absolutely, dude! Since you're resizing your sda3 partition and planning to use it as your /home directory, you should indeed select "/home" as its mount point again during the installation.

When you choose the "Something else" option in the installation process, you have more control over partitioning. After resizing the sda3 partition, follow these steps to set it up as your /home directory:

1. Identify the resized sda3 partition in the partition list.

2. Select the resized sda3 partition, and click on the "Change" button.

3. In the "Edit partition" dialog, choose the file system type (ext4) and check the "Format the partition" option.

4. In the "Use as" dropdown menu, select "/home" as the mount point.

5. Verify that all the other partition settings (e.g., size, file system type) are correct.

6. Click "OK" to apply the changes.

By selecting "/home" as the mount point for the resized sda3 partition, you're assigning that partition specifically for your home directory, where all your user files and personal data will be stored.

After setting up the remaining partitions and completing the installation process, your system will have the resized sda3 partition mounted as the /home directory.

If you have any more questions or need further assistance with the installation, feel free to ask, dude!
 

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