Charlie Corder aka 70 Tango Charlie

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Moderator's NOTE - this set up for the Member, so please welcome him, not me :) Wizard



My name is Charlie Corder,
I guess there is something about old people having to take longer to do things: so, I will now fill you all in on some of my background.
I got involved with computers when Timex first came out with a small box to hook up to the TV set. I could not figure out what to do after I plugged it in so it sat in the basement in its' box.
Next came in 1993 when a friend invited me to 'get on the internet' at the local library. I knew nothing at the time about computers. It took 30 minutes, but I was finally able to turn the cp on and off.
Next came a gift desktop so I could learn how to type.
In 1995 I had my first internet capable cp. It was Windows 95. Stayed with Windows until about 2014 when I found Linux. Since then I have downloaded and installed several different distros, mainly to see which ones were the easiest to transition to for a Win person. I have settled on Linux Mint Mate.
My philosophy is - and has been for quite a while - you are never too old to learn something new.
I do some Terminal stuff, but prefer the GUI, because it's more familiar to me.
I am convinced that Linux would be everything that the average cp user could ever want or need. It does require some learning, but, doesn't everything when you are first introduced to it?
I just bought an ASUS netbook about a month ago for under $300. It came with Win 10 {which I cannot stand} which I immediately erased and installed LM 19.2 Tina. Have not been one bit sorry, not even a tiny bit. LOL.
I guess us older people tend to get 'windy' and don't know when to stop; so I will stop, with this comment - Keep the good things coming, as I am learning a whole lot on Linux dot Org.


Birthday Nov 15, 1934 (Age: 84) Location Jenison Michigan USA
Gender Male Occupation Retired Shoemaker
 


poorguy

Well-Known Member
My name is Charlie Corder,
Hello Charlie Corder,

Welcome to Linux.org forums and by the way It's still Halloween where I'm at so Happy Halloween.

I guess there is something about old people having to take longer to do things:
I don't know about that hell I'm 67 and ain't in no hurry to quickly do anything and never have been.

I am convinced that Linux would be everything that the average cp user could ever want or need. It does require some learning, but, doesn't everything when you are first introduced to it?
Linux is a good choice for anyone who has the willingness and desire to learn Linux.

I'm happy with Linux and it does most everything I need.

I guess us older people tend to get 'windy' and don't know when to stop; so I will stop, with this comment - Keep the good things coming, as I am learning a whole lot on Linux dot Org.
It ain't just older folks that tend to get "windy" , a lot of windy folks on Linux.org , you'll fit right in. :D
 
Last edited:

Granny Sue

Active Member
Welcome to you, Charlie Corte This is a great place to learn Linux. And I am just loving the Linux I’m learning. You had me caught up in your introduction until I got to the very end where you said you were 84! Not only was I caught up at that point, but I was also flabbergasted. I was proud of myself for learning a new computer operating system at 68, I don’t have anything on you. :D Don’t worry about being too windy here, I’m pretty windy myself and they seem to put up with me OK. I think we’re going to have a lot of fun here.
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Hey Charlie

In 1995 I had my first internet capable cp. It was Windows 95. Stayed with Windows until about 2014 when I found Linux.
I attended the local launch of Windows 95 in Brisbane Queensland Australia in October 1995.

The theme song was The Rolling Stones which begins "If you start me up, if you start me up I'll never stop".

Hilarious, in hindsight.

Likewise 2014 was when I blew away Windows 7 to embrace a totally Linux lifestyle, never looked back.

We look forward to sharing in your adventures and journeys in Linux.

Chris
 
Thanks to you all for your kind welcome.
It will take me a while to get things sorted out, but ..... I'll keep working at it.
Here's a bit of info on the name 'Tango Charlie'.
I earned a pilots' license in 1966. Later I advanced to high performance aircraft. One was a Cessna 210. The call letters on it were 70TC. In flying the letters are pronounced phonetically - Tango Charlie.
After flying that AC for some time, I became known to family and friends as Tango Charlie.
I retired from flying in 1995.
Gotta go for now.
TC
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Here's a bit of info on the name 'Tango Charlie'.
I earned a pilots' license in 1966. Later I advanced to high performance aircraft. One was a Cessna 210. The call letters on it were 70TC. In flying the letters are pronounced phonetically - Tango Charlie.
After flying that AC for some time, I became known to family and friends as Tango Charlie.
I retired from flying in 1995.

TC
I learned to fly a Cessna 172 Skyhawk in the 1990s and did get my private pilots license.


Due to the cost of flying I was forced to abandon it. :(

It was a thrill and I'm glad I had the opportunity to learn and experience. :)
 
Poor guy,
You would no doubt be poorer today if you had kept flying. As you said, it is expensive.
I was able to go on and get more ratings and a couple of instructor tickets. That was the only way I could keep flying - to get paid for it.
TC
 

Granny Sue

Active Member
My son took went to flight school for a time and absolutely loved it. He wanteed to take me up so bad, but I'm not one for small planes - safety in numbers, I always say. However, now he he's a truck driver and I really regret not going up with him when I had the opportunity.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member
Poor guy,
You would no doubt be poorer today if you had kept flying. As you said, it is expensive.
I was able to go on and get more ratings and a couple of instructor tickets. That was the only way I could keep flying - to get paid for it.
TC
No doubt.
A Wife and for children and everything else was expensive enough.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
@70 Tango Charlie
G'day and welcome to the community.
I concur with your philosophy about never being to old to learn something new.
TC, you and I have something in common, you flew'em and I fixed'em (Avtech - electrical) though I also learnt to fix engines and air-frames in the RAAF but didn't convert to a civilian licence.
 

VP9KS

Well-Known Member
I learned to fly a Cessna 172 Skyhawk in the 1990s and did get my private pilots license.


Due to the cost of flying I was forced to abandon it. :(

It was a thrill and I'm glad I had the opportunity to learn and experience. :)
I can relate! I have flown the 150, 172, 177RG, and182. I owned a 150 model J. Got my private ticket Jan 11th of 76! Welcome aboard Charlie!!
 
@70 Tango Charlie
G'day and welcome to the community.
I concur with your philosophy about never being to old to learn something new.
TC, you and I have something in common, you flew'em and I fixed'em (Avtech - electrical) though I also learnt to fix engines and air-frames in the RAAF but didn't convert to a civilian licence.
I flew out of an uncontrolled field most of the time. I had a friend who was the local mechanic and was an active member of the EEA - Experimental Aircraft Association. Many times he bailed me out when having trouble with one of the AC.
TC
 
My son took went to flight school for a time and absolutely loved it. He wanteed to take me up so bad, but I'm not one for small planes - safety in numbers, I always say. However, now he he's a truck driver and I really regret not going up with him when I had the opportunity.
Hi Granny Sue,
If I have any regrets about giving it up, it's that I am not able to take my grand-children for rides. Other than that, it was lots of fun - and safe too.
As a side; my mother in law was totally against me learning to fly. So, when my wife came home one time and said that her mother wanted to go for a plane ride, I was stunned. However, she had changed her mind and now wanted the experience of going up in the air.
Knowing how apprehensive most people are about flying, as an instructor I figured out why and was able to allay most fears they had.
Anyhow, once we got off the ground and up in the smooth air, she was hooked. I picked the best part of the day when there is almost no turbulence - just before sundown - and we flew over the city just as the lights were coming on. She was so happy that she did not want to come down!!!
More Later.
TC
 
I can relate! I have flown the 150, 172, 177RG, and182. I owned a 150 model J. Got my private ticket Jan 11th of 76! Welcome aboard Charlie!!
Hi VP9KS,
All very good aircraft. I flew many hours for a company that owned a 182. Nice.
The most fun I had was in an Aeronca Champ. Tail dragger with stick and rudder, and front and rear seats. Slow but so much fun to fly.
The last plane I had a piece of was a 150. Unfortunately, It got totaled out in a 100 mph windstorm. Had to sell it for salvage.
Later,
TC
 

VP9KS

Well-Known Member
Hi VP9KS,
All very good aircraft. I flew many hours for a company that owned a 182. Nice.
The most fun I had was in an Aeronca Champ. Tail dragger with stick and rudder, and front and rear seats. Slow but so much fun to fly.
The last plane I had a piece of was a 150. Unfortunately, It got totaled out in a 100 mph windstorm. Had to sell it for salvage.
Later,
TC
I kinda like the Champion Citabria, with the red paint scheme:p. It would tow banners across the beach nicely, low and slow. Of course you always needed to have a pair of binoculars at hand o_O. I loved the little red Pitts also:D. It was lots of fun. Nothing like doing hammerheads!! nyuk, nyuk

Happy Trails,
Paul

P.S. sorry about the spelling errors, I am on the road, using my tablet again.
 
Last edited:

VP9KS

Well-Known Member
Thanks to you all for your kind welcome.
It will take me a while to get things sorted out, but ..... I'll keep working at it.
Here's a bit of info on the name 'Tango Charlie'.
I earned a pilots' license in 1966. Later I advanced to high performance aircraft. One was a Cessna 210. The call letters on it were 70TC. In flying the letters are pronounced phonetically - Tango Charlie.
After flying that AC for some time, I became known to family and friends as Tango Charlie.
I retired from flying in 1995.
Gotta go for now.
TC
N8260E Beechcraft T-34B Used it and the C-177RG (N2614V) for complex aircraft time for the comercial ticket. Those were the days, My friend!!!

Happy Trails,
Paul
 

VP9KS

Well-Known Member
I flew out of an uncontrolled field most of the time. I had a friend who was the local mechanic and was an active member of the EEA - Experimental Aircraft Association. Many times he bailed me out when having trouble with one of the AC.
TC
The EAA flyin is a GAS!!! Got to go there in 83. OH MY!!!!!!!!! Watching Bob Hoover do aerobatics in a Rockwell Shrike Commander. It doesn't get any better than that, mate!
 

VP9KS

Well-Known Member
The nice thing about the 182 was that if you could get it into a field (read as a SHORT one) you had enough power to get it back out. You can't say the same thing for the 150 & 172. You can land them on a runway that you would not have enough power to get back out of, unless you only weigh 50 pounds.
 

Members online


Top