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Can a dodgy power supply fry your cpu/graphics card ?

Discussion in 'General Computing' started by darrendazzler, Jan 19, 2017.

  1. Had my Jeantech jnp-700-A12C 700Watt power supply for 8/9 years. Yes shes worked hard God bless her. Anyway my computer dies before christmas, I didn't know the cause as the computer still powered up, but the power to the graphics card was intermitent and it wouldnt boot up, so I decided my 8 year old computer need a serious upgrade.

    Got a new motherboard, i7 cpu and Toshiba PCI-E SSD, decided my graphics card and power supply was ok (i was still unaware it was misbeahaving at this point). Soooo, put it all together and boom graphics card was intermittent, wouldn't boot up and the CPU warning light on the new motherboard was flashing red. Decided to remove the graphics card and use the motherboards onboard graphics........ CPU red light still there and wouldn't even go into bios.

    At this point I looked at the power supply and thought, oh shheeeeet. I bought a new Corsair 800Watt PSU and switched it on, still not going into BIOS. so I am assuming the old power supply fried the graphics card (it required two 12v connectors) the old CPU and probably the new i7 CPU and even the new motherboard ?????



    Help, what do I do now, if i had a multimeter i could test the old PSU i guess ?
     
    EthereumEnthusiast likes this.
  2. Crippled

    Crippled Guest

    If a power supply has voltage regulation problems that cause over voltage issues it can destroy the motherboard and everything attached to it.
     
  3. Thanks for you reply, I suppose newer motherboards have voltage protection but my motherboard was 8 years old so I guess it didn't.
     
    EthereumEnthusiast likes this.
  4. Crippled

    Crippled Guest

    Those protections can only go so far.
     
    EthereumEnthusiast likes this.

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