What's involved in installing Linux on a computer currently running Windows XP?



Vrai

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What's involved in running Linux on a Windows XP computer?
It is very easy.
First step is to download the Linux distro of your choice.
Next make a bootable CD/DVD or USB with the downloaded Linux image.
Then set your computers BIOS to boot from the CD/DVD or USB.
Insert the CD/DVD or the USB and restart the machine.
The computer should start and run from the CD/DVD or USB with the Linux image on it.

The tricky part may be in finding a Linux operating system which will run well on a machine old enough to have come with Windows XP installed on it. Look for what is called a "lightweight" distro.

Puppy Linux comes to mind as well as Linux Lite.

Really can't make a good recommendation without knowing something about the hardware it will be run on.
 

arochester

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Does your computer have a make and model, or can you give us some basic specs?

How much RAM have you got?

Do you know if it is a 32bit or 64bit machine?
 
D

Deleted member 58530

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Although it was written for Linux Mint 18.xx it will work on most Linux distros 32 bit or 64 bit.

Have a read.

Please post model numeber and pc specs type / brand / how much memory / type of processor and speed of processor etc.
 

wizardfromoz

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Next make a bootable CD/DVD or USB with the downloaded Linux image.
something that is essential here is to let you know that the downloaded Linux .iso must be burned to the optical medium or usb stick. using special software. it is not sufficient to make a bootable device and then just copy the .iso to it.

software that can be used for this purpose on windows include (for USB stick)

Etcher
Rufus
UNetBootin

unetbootin includes an option for Persistence, which allows for changes to be made on the stick and saved between boots. i understand Rufus also has that option now, but have not tried it.

HTH and welcome to the site :)

chris turner
wizardfromoz
 

sp331yi

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wizardfromoz said, " . . . something that is essential here is to let you know that the downloaded Linux .iso must be burned to the optical medium . . ." and gave examples of software to 'burn' to USB. Another to
burn to CD
To dual-boot
Or just nuke the hard drive and install from ISO

Depending on RAM installed it's probably going to be a 32bit Linux distro of lightweight like (at most) a lubuntu minimal install (or antiX or Salix or Zenwalk) IMHO. Screwing with UEFI on an old machine is for the birds, so most likely non-sytemd distro is more practical. If you want "pretty" go with MX is one suggestion.

Above all, have fun and be free -- the greatest benefits of GNU/Linux!
 

Sigma333

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something that is essential here is to let you know that the downloaded Linux .iso must be burned to the optical medium or usb stick. using special software. it is not sufficient to make a bootable device and then just copy the .iso to it.

software that can be used for this purpose on windows include (for USB stick)

Etcher
Rufus
UNetBootin

unetbootin includes an option for Persistence, which allows for changes to be made on the stick and saved between boots. i understand Rufus also has that option now, but have not tried it.

HTH and welcome to the site :)

chris turner
wizardfromoz
Or if you're a lazy newbie like me, you can just buy a LiveCD of whatever version of whatever distro you like off Ebay for under $10. Going through the ten to twenty step process to burn a CD/DVD on XP I can live without....but then I'm a lazy newbie!
 

sp331yi

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+1 poorguy!

Download ISOburn
Download SystemRescueCD
Download MX Linux or buy it from the guy in Denver
Get CDs
Burn the above ISOs

Prepare hdd with SystemRescueCD
Partitioning
Formatting
Set boot flag on / partition
(this will have to be done, any way you look at it and It's all in the manual here)

Install Linux [See Vrai's post re: BIOS]
SIMPLE! and only 7 steps!
Enjoy!
 

Vrai

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Or if you're a lazy newbie like me, you can just buy a LiveCD of whatever version of whatever distro you like off Ebay for under $10. Going through the ten to twenty step process to burn a CD/DVD on XP I can live without....but then I'm a lazy newbie!
Send me $9 and I will burn any Linux distro you like to a DVD and mail it to you! :cool:
 
D

Deleted member 58530

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Download ISOburn
Download SystemRescueCD
Download MX Linux or buy it from the guy in Denver
Get CDs
Burn the above ISOs

Prepare hdd with SystemRescueCD
Partitioning
Formatting
Set boot flag on / partition
(this will have to be done, any way you look at it and It's all in the manual here)

Install Linux [See Vrai's post re: BIOS]
SIMPLE! and only 7 steps!
Enjoy!
Hmm.

I download the the iso.
Then write the image to the DVD.

I place the DVD into the DVD tray and restart the computer and let the DVD do the rest.

I never download and create a rescue disc.
What am I going to rescue I haven't installed the Linux distro yet.

Partitioning / Formatting / Set boot flag on partition is all done by the Linux installer that comes with the Linux distro.

A successful end result is the goal no matter what method used.
 

sp331yi

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I never download and create a rescue disc.
What am I going to rescue I haven't installed the Linux distro yet.
OPTIONS, my friend! Always keep them open. I refuse to accept only the ones that come with the distro installer. Besides, that's what GNU/Linux is all about!

A successful end result is the goal no matter what method used.
Damn right! You do it your way, I'll do it mine. (I've never fit under the bell curve!)
Have a good 'socially distanced' day! LOL
 
D

Deleted member 58530

Guest
I totally agree with having options and you are right about Linux being about options.

Perhaps by me only loading the bare minimum and letting the Linux installer do everything for me then perhaps I'm also lazy and just don't realize it. :D

Have a good day my friend. :)
 

Sigma333

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+1 poorguy!

Download ISOburn
Download SystemRescueCD
Download MX Linux or buy it from the guy in Denver
Get CDs
Burn the above ISOs

Prepare hdd with SystemRescueCD
Partitioning
Formatting
Set boot flag on / partition
(this will have to be done, any way you look at it and It's all in the manual here)

Install Linux [See Vrai's post re: BIOS]
SIMPLE! and only 7 steps!
Enjoy!
Sorry the guy in Denver is gone...Ebay now. And you neglected to mention all the additional steps to use ISOburn, the steps to burn the above ISOs, do the checksum, and whatever else is required. How about you include all them steps, then compare the final tally to going to Ebay, signing in, using the search box, looking for what you want in the search results, hitting the 'buy' button, logging into Paypal, hitting the 'buy' button, waiting for mail delivery, popping the CD in the PC, and following the install process laid out in your chosen distro?
 

jglen490

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What's involved in running Linux on a Windows XP computer?
Let's go back to basics, because everybody has given an opinion about what Linux, what media, and have assumed that your computer is a low end rock.

Basics (as detailed as possible):
CPU (type, speed)
RAM (amount)
Disk (size)
Motherboard (name, model - if possible)

Expectations:
Dual boot ( I would hope not, with XP, but your choice)
Single boot Linux
What you intend to do - office stuff, web surfing, coding, email, play videos, play music, and so on.
 

darry1966

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Duel booting is a great idea to explore different Linux distros to find the one that hits the spot.

XP is still a great system for tasks other than internet where of course it is a liability, so keep it till you no longer need it.

I see alot of Threads entitled which is the best Linux Distro - the best answer the one your using.
 

flavio

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I used to dualboot Windows XP and Kubuntu (and Linux Mint or Debian KDE, too) from 2009 to 2016, in my old computer.

If you have an old computer, as I had from April 2009 to last January 2020, it is probably a BIOS / MBR machine, and Windows XP is at the beginning of your "first" (or "unique") HDD. ─ Probably, WinXP uses all your unique HDD.

You will need some disk space for Linux ─ either by getting another HDD, either by partitioning your present HDD. ─ This second option is a whole chapter, as you will need to run a "Live" Linux (from DVD, or from a Pendrive), so let's see it later.

For now, you will need to download an ISO image of some newby-friendly Linux distro and "burn" it to a DVD, or to a Pendrive. ─ Mates did already talk about how-to do it.

Then, start or restart you machine, with this DVD in place, or with this Pendrive plugged in, and enter your BIOS Setup, probably by hit DEL since the Boot begins. ─ In BIOS Setup, go to "Boot" section and put DVD or Pendrive as the first option at the top of "Boot priority". ─ Then "save" this configuration, probably by hit F10 and Confirm, to go on.

If it is all right, you will be running a "Live" Linux session ─ where "Live" means that it doesn't affect your installed Windows XP.

Live sessions are a great way to try Linux and start to know about it, to see how does it feel, and how do you deal with it.

You may download and try many Linux distros, so you may find out which of them does match your feeling.

Do it for some weeks, before to choose one of them.

Meanwhile, remember to run GParted, just to "see" how is your HDD partitioned ─ but be aware to never "apply" any change to it!
 


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