Problem installing linux

Georgepsl

New Member
Hello everyone. Well i made a bootable usb and i tried to install linix mint 19.2
The problem is that after the grub menu i ve got a black screen. I managed to install mint via compatible and after reboot i get again black screen , help me please .
 


Condobloke

Well-Known Member
G'day Georgepsi, and Welcome to linux.org

what do you mean by " install mint via compatible"..?

Where did you download LM 19.2 from ?

Did you use a program/app to "burn" the download/ISO to a disc/cd/dvd, or to a usb stick ?

Did you verify the downloaded file ?
 

Georgepsl

New Member
G'day Georgepsi, and Welcome to linux.org

what do you mean by " install mint via compatible"..?

Where did you download LM 19.2 from ?

Did you use a program/app to "burn" the download/ISO to a disc/cd/dvd, or to a usb stick ?

Did you verify the downloaded file ?
First of all thank u for replaying.
I used rufus to burn the iso into the usb. I download LM from the official website but i didnt verify the file.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
It may be worth your while to go back and verify it. Then again I have installed a number of Os's (operating systems) without verifying and have had no problems.

official site

I entered a link in my first post to tell you how to verify.

Did you attempt to run the lm 19.2 "live"......in other words, plug in the usb...start the pc....and have the pc boot to the usb.
If it will do that, then there is every chance that it will install.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Compatibility mode blacklists a wifi driver b43 because of some freezing problems, disables fast graphics mode switching, disables the advanced configuration and power interface and doesn't load the splash screen.

So.......I think it would be best if you were to give us the specs of your pc/laptop...all the info you have....make and model, motherboard, ram, graphics card, etc etc

What was the pc running before you decided to try linux ?

Are you trying to dual boot Linux Mint with windows ?...or is this a completely clean install with nothing else on the hard drive ?
 

JulienCC

Active Member
Your hardware is really recent, both in age and in architecture.
You should use a distro with a recent kernel, like Arch Linux, I think that would be the easiest way.

If you can get your hands on a terminal you can also install a newer kernel with apt.
Code:
# apt search linux-image
# apt install linux-image-[VERSION_NUMBER]
The first line to list the available kernel binaires, the second one to install one. Try to get one above version 5.
 

Georgepsl

New Member
Your hardware is really recent, both in age and in architecture.
You should use a distro with a recent kernel, like Arch Linux, I think that would be the easiest way.

If you can get your hands on a terminal you can also install a newer kernel with apt.
Code:
# apt search linux-image
# apt install linux-image-[VERSION_NUMBER]
The first line to list the available kernel binaires, the second one to install one. Try to get one above version 5.
I will give a try with Arch Linux
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
Good Luck.
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
Oh gosh its so difficult
G'day and welcome @Georgepsl
Just been reading this and I sympathise with you with regards to your problem. I am aware that it seems daunting and challenging. Just sit back a little, relax and think about what @Condobloke and @JulienCC have written, take your time with the problem and do some research and read those items that have been posted on this site that are fairly similar to your problem as they may give you a lead in helping to solve your problem.
 

Georgepsl

New Member
G'day and welcome @Georgepsl
Just been reading this and I sympathise with you with regards to your problem. I am aware that it seems daunting and challenging. Just sit back a little, relax and think about what @Condobloke and @JulienCC have written, take your time with the problem and do some research and read those items that have been posted on this site that are fairly similar to your problem as they may give you a lead in helping to solve your problem.
Hello . Well i 've try everything . Yesterday i installed ubuntu 19.10 which has newest kernel and i had again the same problem (black screen)
 

Nik-Ken-Bah

Active Member
I am with @JulienCC in that you having trouble with your graphics driver and firmware as I am having the same sort of problem in that regards as I cannot connect to the internet at all.
Tell me something. Before you installed Ubuntu did you first run it up from the USB stick?
Did it display the desktop and did you open folders to see what they contain or opened up any of the programs and played with them, before you installed it?
This is what I did with my problem first and no matter what distro I used my problem still persisted with them as well. Why because the distro on the USB stick loads up your Ram and uses all the firmware that is on your motherboard, in your case the graphics card and drivers, and the USB is the default disk for the distro instead of your Hard Drive.
 

Georgepsl

New Member
I am with @JulienCC in that you having trouble with your graphics driver and firmware as I am having the same sort of problem in that regards as I cannot connect to the internet at all.
Tell me something. Before you installed Ubuntu did you first run it up from the USB stick?
Did it display the desktop and did you open folders to see what they contain or opened up any of the programs and played with them, before you installed it?
This is what I did with my problem first and no matter what distro I used my problem still persisted with them as well. Why because the distro on the USB stick loads up your Ram and uses all the firmware that is on your motherboard, in your case the graphics card and drivers, and the USB is the default disk for the distro instead of your Hard Drive.
Yes i run it up first from safe mode where i did the instalation and then after the reboot i had black screen
 

atanere

Well-Known Member
When booting on Ubuntu live USB, it should pause briefly on the "GRUB" screen. This is simple plain screen with text on it... near the bottom it shows "press 'e' to edit" or something like that. You need to be quick and press 'e' before it goes into boot.

Next, anther simple plain screen with text. Look down the screen, probably near the bottom, for line that starts with 'linux'. You'll also see 'ro' and 'quiet' and 'splash'. Use arrow keys to move the cursor into that area, and enter the word 'nomodeset' (without the quotes) between 'quiet' and 'splash'. Be sure to include the extra space needed so words are not jammed together.

After entering 'nomodeset'.... hit F10 key, or you can also CTRL-X to start the boot with the 'nomodeset' now enabled. If that works, you can then install Ubuntu. If after installing, it again goes to black screen, we can tell you how to make 'nomodeset' permanent.

This trick should work with Linux Mint too, if it works with Ubuntu.

Good luck!
 

Georgepsl

New Member
When booting on Ubuntu live USB, it should pause briefly on the "GRUB" screen. This is simple plain screen with text on it... near the bottom it shows "press 'e' to edit" or something like that. You need to be quick and press 'e' before it goes into boot.

Next, anther simple plain screen with text. Look down the screen, probably near the bottom, for line that starts with 'linux'. You'll also see 'ro' and 'quiet' and 'splash'. Use arrow keys to move the cursor into that area, and enter the word 'nomodeset' (without the quotes) between 'quiet' and 'splash'. Be sure to include the extra space needed so words are not jammed together.

After entering 'nomodeset'.... hit F10 key, or you can also CTRL-X to start the boot with the 'nomodeset' now enabled. If that works, you can then install Ubuntu. If after installing, it again goes to black screen, we can tell you how to make 'nomodeset' permanent.

This trick should work with Linux Mint too, if it works with Ubuntu.

Good luck!
Thank you , i will give a try and i ll tell you .
 

JulienCC

Active Member
I realize I didn't really take the time to explain my point, so here are more info :

One of my machines runs with a Ryzen 2400G, which in a way is really similar to a 2700U. The graphics part now runs flawlessly but I had to move to a bleeding edge recent version of everything.

I struggled a lot to make things work using backports and all but then I realized I had to tweak almost everything related to graphics. I decided to move to Debian sid, which an unstable release, and everything worked out of the box, since it has really up to date versions of everything.

The nomodeset is a trick to fallback to default video mode and you won't be able to use the iGPU of your system with this. So it will only be a temporary workarround which could help us getting our hands on log files and tell you what's exactly going on. But from my experience, what's going on is that your hardware is not properly supported by the version of your kernel and everything arround it.

You should also update your bios if you can still boot on Windows. I've seen some people telling that some bios for ryzen laptops are broken.
Take a look at this if you dare : https://bugzilla.kernel.org/show_bug.cgi?id=200087
 

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