Partion related query.

It does not matter what OS, you can always keep separate home partition. Partitioning works similarly under Linux, Windows, BSD (e.g. UFS but not OpenZFS).
Ok
The only time where manual partitioning is not advised is if you plan to use ZFS or BTRFS because of intrinsic properties of file system e.g. you would generate pools but not partitions.
I have no idea about ZFS and BTRFS sorry (I am amature :D)

Thanks by the way @Aristarchus
 


Why I don't create partitions...it's very simple.

You can create an image of your system and store it on an External HDD/SSD...should anything happen even HDD/SSD failure...you loose nothing...so for me there's no need to create partitions for anything especially for Home or anything else.
I mentioned HDDs because SSDs weren't around back then but they are now and are much better than HDDs and more reliable too. At the end of the day the choice is yours...I've been doing this for years (Cloning and Imaging) mostly Imaging now so I know what's good.
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I also did the same thing in past:
Always keep my data in other drive/partition beside "c: drive (root and /home)" for that even my system drive removed or corrupted or deleted it doesn't bother me, I reinstall os install all software and all done, also my system is always oy one user so there is no chance to get deleted other saved data in /home too.
And for my personal data in keep it in other partition in complete different drive and I use raid 5 partition of my 3 hdd so my data is complete secure, same thing I did in Linux too (not now because I don't know how to do it).
 
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Here's my partition setup, the volumes listed under luksdev are btrfs subvolumes.
Code:
NAME        MAJ:MIN RM  SIZE RO TYPE  MOUNTPOINTS
zram0       253:0    0 31.4G  0 disk  [SWAP]
nvme0n1     259:0    0  1.8T  0 disk
├─nvme0n1p1 259:1    0    2G  0 part  /efi
└─nvme0n1p2 259:2    0  1.8T  0 part
  └─luksdev 254:0    0  1.8T  0 crypt /home/maarten/Qemu/images
                                      /var/log
                                      /var/cache
                                      /home
                                      /
I have no idea about "btrfs" but I don't know why it attract me to try it.:D
I need to control myself to do something without knowing it.:D
 
Mine is tiny by comparison !

1707086210857-png.18116
I notice one thing that majority of Linux user don't make many partition, try to keep the number small and simple, it's completely different that what I learn in window, we normally prefer atleast 4 partition minimum.
Please note I am not saying everyone do this but what I normally observe maybe I am wrong.
 
There is really no right or wrong.

Because Linux is about choice......having the freedom to choose freely.

Personally, I like to keep it simple.

Sometime ago I experimented with having a separate /home ect etc etc.....and sometime after that realised that if things went sideways and all sorts of mayhem affected my system, then the probable cause of that mayhem was likely ME....not the system.....and all the work and worry of separating /home and having extra partitions etc etc was not going to help....infact it would make life harder !

I have spent a great deal of time finding a reliable backup app. One that will definitely restore perfectly. It was not as easy as it sounds. It did not need to have all the bells and whistles.....incremental backups and all of that, I do not need that. I simply need to take a full backup each month, and store it on an external drive. Simple.
I do need something that will work. If I manage to screw something up really badly, then I need a backup which will restore, perfectly.

So, I don't need /home someplace else, or numerous partitions etc etc

I just need a system (linux Mint 21.3) which is rock solid, and totally reliable.

Then I can get on with simply enjoying my Linux, without worrying about every little thing. I left all of that behind when I left windows.

I KNOW it is going to be reliable.

It works.

Simple.
 
I think it's better to do things the easy way and not create problems.
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These days with Backup software like Foxclone and Redorescue that can create an image of all used space on the Drive so nothing is lost and it's a simple matter to put the image back on the Drive.

Because the image is stored on an external Drive...if disaster strikes...the worst being Drive failure...you just put the image on a new Drive. I still put files...videos...music etc on an external Drive too...that goes without saying...it's better to be sure than sorry.
m1212.gif
 
I notice one thing that majority of Linux user don't make many partition, try to keep the number small and simple, it's completely different that what I learn in window, we normally prefer atleast 4 partition minimum.
Please note I am not saying everyone do this but what I normally observe maybe I am wrong.
This shows how complicated Windows is.
Linux {depending on which distro you use} is very simple and intuitive; and LOGICAL.
It's all about making things work as simple as possible.
Once you clean the Windows complexity out of your head, and get accustomed to the way Linux works, you will see what I am writing about. Meanwhile, enjoy the Linux journey.
Cheers!
OG
TC
 
This shows how complicated Windows is.
Linux {depending on which distro you use} is very simple and intuitive; and LOGICAL.
It's all about making things work as simple as possible.
Once you clean the Windows complexity out of your head, and get accustomed to the way Linux works, you will see what I am writing about. Meanwhile, enjoy the Linux journey.
Cheers!
OG
TC
Yep you are right sir.
But it take time to know partition system completely.
In window I know mbr and gpt, primary and logical, basic and dynamic, NTFS and Fat32, I know all of this.
But in Linux I don't know anything, so it takes times, main problem is I dont know from where I know all of this, but I find it definitely.
Thanks sir.
 
The fact that Linux doesn't have drives...it has files does confuse beginners but you can use NTFS and FAT32 formatted Flash Drives and External HDDS and SSDs confuses beginners even more.
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Yep you are right sir.
Gparted and my disk partitioning.png

But it take time to know partition system completely.
In window I know mbr and gpt, primary and logical, basic and dynamic, NTFS and Fat32, I know all of this.
But in Linux I don't know anything, so it takes times, main problem is I dont know from where I know all of this, but I find it definitely.
Thanks sir.
you are making things unnecessary alien/complicated. All these are similar under Linux and Windows. Partitioning scheme depends on user. If you want to keep /tmp separate you can (catch: remember to make it big enough) and so on and so for. You can have separate swap partition, you can also keep /var and /var/log on separate partitions too. In fact some of the partitioning schemes are easier under Linux than Windows.
If you have an experience with Windows partitioning then the same rules apply to Linux.
 


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