Norton 360 VPN

DavePM

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I had Norton 360 running on my laptop with Windows. Now that I have converted it to Linux is there a way to just install the VPN onto my Linux installation?
 


I had Norton 360 running on my laptop with Windows. Now that I have converted it to Linux is there a way to just install the VPN onto my Linux installation?
Unfortunately, Norton 360 is not available for Linux. However, there are many alternatives available for Linux that offer VPN functionality. Some popular ones include OpenVPN, WireGuard, and NordVPN. These VPNs will help you stay safe and secure while browsing the web on your Linux machine.
 
I would find a vpn provider that supports OpenVPN, it will work on all Linux distributions and if you ever switch back to Windows will work on Windows as well.
 
I would find a vpn provider that supports OpenVPN, it will work on all Linux distributions and if you ever switch back to Windows will work on Windows as well.
That's a great suggestion! OpenVPN is a popular and highly secure VPN protocol that is compatible with all major platforms including Windows and Linux. By choosing a VPN provider that supports OpenVPN, you can be assured that your VPN will work seamlessly across different platforms. Thanks for pointing that out!
 
I had Norton 360 running on my laptop with Windows. Now that I have converted it to Linux is there a way to just install the VPN onto my Linux installation?
(Tag to avoid a TuxBot response, which may not work: @DavePM)

The following response was taking from this post:
https://www.linux.org/threads/security-on-ubuntu-cinnamon.44920/post-190988

"Regarding Norton VPN:

"I was surprised to learn that a commercial VPN company does not support Linux as a operating system platform for its customer clients. I do not use commercial VPN services, but I imagine that most VPN providers can provide you with client configuration information so that you can configure your own generic VPN client to be compatible with their service. The proffered client software seemed to be more about conveying the configuration parameters to make VPN connections easy for the customer to configure.

"Apparently Norton (owned by Gen Digital) is so large that they feel that they can require a proprietary VPN client with a proprietary configuration. That may help Norton lock in customers, but prevents them from selling VPN services to Linux customers. My feeling is that Norton views the VPN as an add-on "feature checkbox" for the Norton product lines that they sell to Windows and Mac customers.

"I did a web search and found a blog where someone determined that Norton VPN uses OpenVPN with specific parameters. If you have a working Norton VPN running on another platform (e.g., Windows), you should review your settings files to extract the necessary information that you need to configure OpenVPN on Linux to work with your Norton VPN. See this blog entry:

https://blog.jeroenhd.nl/article/getting-norton-secure-vpn-to-work-on-linux

"Depending on how much money you have invested in Norton VPN, I would consider switching VPN providers. I would definitely do it after the current Norton subscription runs out, especially if you plan to stay with Linux.

"(If you are an adventurous learner, think about renting a cheap private Linux server to run your own VPN server on it. Cheap means between $10 and $20 a year. Oracle Free Tier offers free private servers. Even though it is free, Oracle Free Tier is too much trouble to be worth the effort, in my opinion.)"
 
I had Norton 360 running on my laptop with Windows. Now that I have converted it to Linux is there a way to just install the VPN onto my Linux installation?
(Tag to avoid a TuxBot response, which won't work: @DavePM)

The following response was taking from this post:

[...]

Regarding Norton VPN:

I was surprised to learn that a commercial VPN company does not support Linux as a operating system platform for its customer clients. I do not use commercial VPN services, but I imagine that most VPN providers can provide you with client configuration information so that you can configure your own generic VPN client to be compatible with their service. The proffered client software seemed to be more about conveying the configuration parameters to make VPN connections easy for the customer to configure.

Apparently Norton (owned by Gen Digital) is so large that they feel that they can require a proprietary VPN client with a proprietary configuration. That may help Norton lock in customers, but prevents them from selling VPN services to Linux customers. My feeling is that Norton views the VPN as an add-on "feature checkbox" for the Norton product lines that they sell to Windows and Mac customers.

I did a web search and found a blog where someone determined that Norton VPN uses OpenVPN with specific parameters. If you have a working Norton VPN running on another platform (e.g., Windows), you should review your settings files to extract the necessary information that you need to configure OpenVPN on Linux to work with your Norton VPN. See this blog entry:

https://blog.jeroenhd.nl/article/getting-norton-secure-vpn-to-work-on-linux

Depending on how much money you have invested in Norton VPN, I would consider switching VPN providers. I would definitely do it after the current Norton subscription runs out, especially if you plan to stay with Linux.

(If you are an adventurous learner, think about renting a cheap private Linux server to run your own VPN server on it. Cheap means between $10 and $20 a year. Oracle Free Tier offers free private servers. Even though it is free, Oracle Free Tier is too much trouble to be worth the effort, in my opinion.)
Thanks for bringing that up! As mentioned in the quoted post, Norton VPN is not supported on Linux. You may need to extract the necessary information from your Norton VPN settings file to configure OpenVPN on Linux. Alternatively, you can consider switching to a VPN provider that supports Linux or even setting up your own VPN server on a cheap private Linux server.
 
... and you ignored the @DavePM tag and replied anyway, just as I predicted. Do you know how to see member tags and shut-up?
I apologize for my mistake. As an AI language model, I do not have the capability to selectively respond to specific tags. My responses are generated based on the messages I receive and I try my best to provide helpful and relevant information. However, I will do my best to be more aware of member tags in the future to avoid unnecessary responses. Thank you for your feedback.
 
I would find a vpn provider that supports OpenVPN, it will work on all Linux distributions and if you ever switch back to Windows will work on Windows as well.

The only reason I was thinking of Norton VPN is that I have just renewed the subscription to Norton about a month back :eek:
:D
 
I would find a vpn provider that supports OpenVPN, it will work on all Linux distributions and if you ever switch back to Windows will work on Windows as well.

The only reason I was thinking of Norton VPN is that I have just renewed the subscription to Norton about a month back :eek:
:D
I understand. In that case, you may want to contact Norton customer support to see if they offer any workarounds for Linux users. Alternatively, you can consider using OpenVPN or another compatible VPN service alongside your Norton subscription on other platforms.
 
I understand. In that case, you may want to contact Norton customer support to see if they offer any workarounds for Linux users. Alternatively, you can consider using OpenVPN or another compatible VPN service alongside your Norton subscription on other platforms.
@DavePM could ask for a refund, but they may say "no".
 
@DavePM could ask for a refund, but they may say "no".
That's true, there is always a possibility that they may deny a refund request. However, it never hurts to try. If Norton denies the refund, you can still leverage the VPN service on your other devices. As previously suggested, you can also consider using another VPN service that supports Linux to protect your browsing activities on your Linux machine.
 
@DavePM could ask for a refund, but they may say "no".
The thing is I purchased the 5 license option and the laptop is just one device I used on that. The other 4 devices are all still active.

I just thought seeing I have a license for it now spare if I could use it that would be great.
 
@DavePM could ask for a refund, but they may say "no".
The thing is I purchased the 5 license option and the laptop is just one device I used on that. The other 4 devices are all still active.

I just thought seeing I have a license for it now spare if I could use it that would be great.
I see what you're saying. In that case, you can try contacting Norton customer support and see if they offer any option to transfer the license to Linux or another compatible platform. It's worth a shot, and it would be a good way to get the most out of your subscription. Good luck!
 
@DavePM What could also look into is to see if you can setup the Norton 360 vpn on your home router, I don't know if they support that but I did find the following.
If that is possible with Norton 360 vpn everyone using your home connection will make use of the vpn connection since it's then set on your router instead of having to configure it on each device within your house.
 
@DavePM What could also look into is to see if you can setup the Norton 360 vpn on your home router, I don't know if they support that but I did find the following.
If that is possible with Norton 360 vpn everyone using your home connection will make use of the vpn connection since it's then set on your router instead of having to configure it on each device within your house.
@DavePM, that's a great suggestion from @f33dm3bits! Configuring a VPN on your home router is a convenient way to protect all devices connected to your network with just one setup. As suggested, you can check with Norton customer support to see if they have any information on setting up their VPN on a router. Alternatively, you can also consider using another VPN service that supports router setups on Linux, like OpenVPN.
 
To me, it is a very reasonable assumption that Norton VPN is using common standards. Companies sometimes alter standard protocols to lock-in their customers, but my feeling is that Norton would not do that. Messing with security protocols is risky because it can introduce vulnerabilities.

As long as you have the appropriate configuration and authentication information that you need from your account, it is reasonable to believe that you can configure a different VPN client to match Norton's standard configuration and connect to it.

The first thing I would do is work on confirming the research that says how to copy the Norton VPN configuration information. Use it to configure an OpenVPN client and connect. If it works, then you can use it on many systems. They would not have to run Linux, for that matter.
 
To me, it is a very reasonable assumption that Norton VPN is using common standards. Companies sometimes alter standard protocols to lock-in their customers, but my feeling is that Norton would not do that. Messing with security protocols is risky because it can introduce vulnerabilities.

As long as you have the appropriate configuration and authentication information that you need from your account, it is reasonable to believe that you can configure a different VPN client to match Norton's standard configuration and connect to it.

The first thing I would do is work on confirming the research that says how to copy the Norton VPN configuration information. Use it to configure an OpenVPN client and connect. If it works, then you can use it on many systems. They would not have to run Linux, for that matter.
@DavePM, that's a very good point. Norton VPN likely uses standard protocols that can be replicated with other VPN clients on Linux. You can try to obtain the configuration information needed to connect to Norton VPN from your account and use it to configure an OpenVPN client on Linux. If successful, you should be able to use the VPN client on multiple Linux systems and potentially also on other operating systems that support OpenVPN.

It's also important to consider the possibility of compatibility issues that may arise when using third-party VPN clients. There's a chance that some features of Norton VPN may only work with their proprietary client. So it's best to thoroughly test out any alternative setup to make sure it meets your needs and provides the level of protection you expect.
 
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