New to Linux. Please help



VP9KS

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Welcome to the group. As far as selecting a distribution to start with, there are as many opinions as there are distributions, a whole hockey-sock full. To start with, let us know what level of experience you have, that is have you looked around any, or are you just sticking your toe in the water for the first time?

One place to see just what I am talking about, that is the multiple distributions, is DistroWatch.
There is a listing on the right side of the most popular 100 distributions, rated by the number of hits on their site. When you decide on one or two to try, let us know, and we will assist you in making a bootable dvd or thumb drive to actually try it. The best part about this is that most distributions will allow you to test run from the media without installing. This is called a"live DVD" or "live USB drive". Check it out, and let us know. you cannot just copy the install file to a dvd and expect it to run. It takes a bit more than that, but we can assist you with that.

Happy Trails
Paul
 
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Welcome to the group. As far as selecting a distribution to start with, there are as many opinions as there are distributions, a whole hockey-sock full. To start with, let us know what level of experience you have, that is have you looked around any, or are you just sticking your toe in the water for the first time?

One place to see just what I am talking about, that is the multiple distributions, is DistroWatch.
There is a listing on the right side of the most popular 100 distributions, rated by the number of hits on their site. When you decide on one or two to try, let us know, and we will assist you in making a bootable dvd or thumb drive to actually try it. The best part about this is that most distributions will allow you to test run from the media without installing. This is called a"live DVD" or "live USB drive". Check it out, and let us know. you cannot just copy the install file to a dvd and expect it to run. It takes a bit more than that, but we can assist you with that.

Happy Trails
Paul
Thanks Paul.
I'll have a look. My level right now is basic. I'm just looking for something to replace Windows that no fuss and easy to use
 

wizardfromoz

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Boodhoo ... sounds like Indian-Mauritius.

(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke, trips over world atlas ... curses)

Hi Raakhee and welcome to linux.org :). I am from Australia, east coast.

Some of the choices that are available to you can be influenced by the type of computer you have. If you let us know the brand name and model number, we can better advise. For example, I am typing this from my laptop, a Toshiba Satellite S70t-A, about 3 years old. With its configuration, I can easily run any of those hundreds of Linux Paul referred to.

As well as DistroWatch, an excellent starting point, there is an article here

https://renewablepcs.wordpress.com/about-linux/kde-gnome-or-xfce/

... which gives a little detail on some of the Desktop Environments (DEs) available. Some of the Distributions (distros) have a number of options available, others might just have the one or two. Think of them as being a little like the differences in "look and feel" between Windows 7, 8 and 10.

...you cannot just copy the install file to a dvd and expect it to run...
... or USB stick. That is quite so.

If you have ever "burned" a DVD for data storage, or burned a music or movie DVD, similar process, but we use special tools. There are ones available (free) which can be downloaded and installed on Windows, or your Windows may have one already.

So let us know your Windows version as well. ;)

Yet another option for you is to download a Linux Distro file (called .iso), burn it to USB/DVD, and install it alongside Windows. This is called dual-booting.

You can then evaluate how you like Linux (or not) and whether it suits your purposes, and if you choose to commit to it, you can then blow away your Windows, and recover the extra space for your Linux. After backing up any personal data you wish to safeguard, of course.

So, many many options, but Linux is all about freedom of choice. :D

I went totally Linux 4 years ago, after 25 years with Windows, and I have not looked back.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

VP9KS

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Cough, cough. we need a vent fan for all this smoke:p:D. Oh, Hi Wiz. I didn't see you there. nyuk, nyuk
 

VP9KS

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I'm just looking for something to replace Windows
I completely understand. I have to put up with windows:eek: at work:eek::eek::eek: (there I go using 4 letter words!), but I have a choice at home, and prefer Linux. My preferred distro is Slackware, but I have other distros in use also.

Happy Trails,
Paul
 
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Boodhoo ... sounds like Indian-Mauritius.

(Wizard appears in a puff of smoke, trips over world atlas ... curses)

Hi Raakhee and welcome to linux.org :). I am from Australia, east coast.

Some of the choices that are available to you can be influenced by the type of computer you have. If you let us know the brand name and model number, we can better advise. For example, I am typing this from my laptop, a Toshiba Satellite S70t-A, about 3 years old. With its configuration, I can easily run any of those hundreds of Linux Paul referred to.

As well as DistroWatch, an excellent starting point, there is an article here

https://renewablepcs.wordpress.com/about-linux/kde-gnome-or-xfce/

... which gives a little detail on some of the Desktop Environments (DEs) available. Some of the Distributions (distros) have a number of options available, others might just have the one or two. Think of them as being a little like the differences in "look and feel" between Windows 7, 8 and 10.



... or USB stick. That is quite so.

If you have ever "burned" a DVD for data storage, or burned a music or movie DVD, similar process, but we use special tools. There are ones available (free) which can be downloaded and installed on Windows, or your Windows may have one already.

So let us know your Windows version as well. ;)

Yet another option for you is to download a Linux Distro file (called .iso), burn it to USB/DVD, and install it alongside Windows. This is called dual-booting.

You can then evaluate how you like Linux (or not) and whether it suits your purposes, and if you choose to commit to it, you can then blow away your Windows, and recover the extra space for your Linux. After backing up any personal data you wish to safeguard, of course.

So, many many options, but Linux is all about freedom of choice. :D

I went totally Linux 4 years ago, after 25 years with Windows, and I have not looked back.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
Hi Wizard
That sure is a lot of information.
Husband's surname is Boodhoo. Mine is Toolsi. We both are South African born but have ancestral ties to Mauritius.

My laptop is a Samsung Ativ Notebook. Model NP270E5G running Windows 10, 64 bit. Possibly 5yrs old.

I've burned CDs before but would rather use a USB.
I would like a replacement to my Windows Desktop for everyday use. Not been keeping up with the programming world so my skills are pretty basic now.
 

VP9KS

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Ok, I show that as a 1.8ghz dual core with 4gb of ram. That should do you fine.

What is the capacity of the USB stick that you intend to use?

Have you any ideas on which distributions you would like to take for a test drive, (kick the tires, so to speak) or are you still looking? If so, no worries, take your time:D. It is like an all you can eat buffet, without the bloating or gas.:p

Happy Trails,
Paul
 

wizardfromoz

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That sure is a lot of information.
Yes, it's said that I can talk 6 feet under water with a mouth full of cement, but I usually turn those people into toads :rolleyes:

Thanks for the laptop details, so it is likely you have a 500GB HDD with 4GB RAM (up to a maximum of 8GB), and can run any Linux you choose :p

You also have a computer that runs on what is called UEFI, which replaces the traditional BIOS system, although the expression "UEFI BIOS" is often misused.

What that means is that you may encounter a few hiccups if you install Linux Lite, recommended by good colleague @arochester above.

It is best installed by switching your computer's "BIOS" over to what is known as Legacy BIOS, or CSM (Compatibility Support Module) Mode.

According to Linux Lite's maker, Jerry Bezencon, they are not likely to change over to UEFI support (https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/introductions/uefi-and-linux-lite/ ).

Don't get me wrong, LL is a great product, here's my desktop in it.



SCREENSHOT 1 - Linux Lite v3.8 codenamed 'Citrine', Xfce DE (Desktop Environment) and "Architecture" wallpaper (my choice)

Note the stylised capital T on the red background icon in the panel 2nd from right. That is my install of Timeshift, which is like Windows Restore you may be familiar with. Very handy, can be installed on most Linux.

LL currently ships with a similar product, called Systemback, which is also good, but it is being replaced in 2 days time, with the release 1st June (likely 2nd your time and mine) of the 'Diamond' series, starting with v4.0. Replaced with ... Timeshift.

If you wish to read up on Timeshift, and see how useful it can be, I have a Tute here - https://www.linux.org/threads/timeshift-similar-solutions-safeguard-recover-your-linux.15241/

... it's a lot of info to absorb, but you know where to find it, now :p

MX-17

... is another I like (I run about 40 Linux on each computer), you can read about that here https://mxlinux.org/ , it is as low on memory consumption as Linux Lite, and my desktop for it looks like this



SCREENSHOT 2 - MX-17 with a default desktop wallpaper

My best advice mirrors that of Paul ... arm yourself with a small supply of USB sticks, 4GB or larger, they can all be reused later.

Take a wee wander through DistroWatch and see what is available, what takes your fancy. Using the links from DistroWatch you can get official downloads, they will be a filename ending in .iso . Then come back here and we can tell you how to verify their integrity, burn them (not just copy) to stick, and how to tweak your startup BIOS to boot from a stick.

Cheers

Wizard
 

atanere

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My best advice mirrors that of Paul ... arm yourself with a small supply of USB sticks, 4GB or larger, they can all be reused later.
All good advice above, and welcome to the forums! I would comment here to note that you don't need the super large size USB flash drives that are available these days (64 GB and larger). As Wizard said, 4 GB (up to 8 GB or 16 GB) are really ideal and should be much cheaper to purchase 2 or 3 of them. They are reusable, but it is nice to have several so that you can boot up on one version of Linux, then remove that one and boot up on another to compare them to find what you like best.

Sometimes in the process of installing and re-installing Linux on the flash drives, they can seem to become corrupted... or Windows may think that it is corrupted (or damaged, or reduced in capacity). This doesn't always happen, but just to let you know that the drives can be fixed/restored with Linux if this happens, although Windows may not be able to fix/restore it.

Besides Linux Lite and MX-17, I would also recommend Linux Mint and Peppermint OS. These are all good starters for you to try. But if none of these appeal to you, there are dozens more... each with a slightly different look and feel to it. Your Samsung laptop should be capable of running any Linux distro, but as mentioned, you may need to go into the UEFI/BIOS settings to enable Legacy Mode (disable UEFI Mode) and also disable Secure Boot. Some Linux versions will require that, but others will work without making those changes.

Cheers
 

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