MX Linux Installation

buffalo

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I used UNetbootin to burn the iso on C drive and hit reboot. Following screens are:


1.
IMG_20200621_003025.jpg



2. This is where it got stuck.
IMG_20200621_003214.jpg


How do I fix this? Plz suggest.
 

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captain-sensible

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C: drive is pretty much synonymous with Microsoft speak for hard drive , so are you saying you put an iso straight onto your hard drive ?

Normally you use unetbootin to put an iso on a usb stick; boot from the usb stick and proceed to install to hard drive. unetbootin may also not be one of the best tools to put an iso onto a usb stick .
 

buffalo

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C: drive is pretty much synonymous with Microsoft speak for hard drive , so are you saying you put an iso straight onto your hard drive ?

Normally you use unetbootin to put an iso on a usb stick; boot from the usb stick and proceed to install to hard drive. unetbootin may also not be one of the best tools to put an iso onto a usb stick .
Since I don't have a usb stick available right now, I followed the instructions from this video :
How to install Linux without CD or USB
You can see that he used the boot folder created by unetbootin onto the hard-drive as a live boot media and then proceeded to install as normal.
 
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Condobloke

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I would not recommend following that

The comments are full of complaints and problems, and the majority of the question go unanswered.

At the bottom of the page there is this...

Dustin M

Dustin M 3 months ago

Can I install this and completely remove windows from my hard drive?



TUTORIALS HOME


TUTORIALS HOME
3 months ago

No, dual boot only
 

Condobloke

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So.....get yourself a usb stick....and READ the tutorial below. Yes it is a long read, but it makes sense. Read it several times.

BE SURE....that you either wish to WIPE windows completely, or that you wish to dual boot

If you wish to dual boot, ignore the tutorial below and post a fresh topic saying that is what you wish to do.




**How to install/try Linux Mint on your Windows PC**

First, you can -- __and should__ -- try Linux Mint before switching to it. Fortunately, unlike other operating systems, Linux distros like Mint make it easy to give them a test run before installing it.

First you'll need to download a copy of Linux Mint, which comes with three different desktops: MATE, Xfce, and its default desktop, Cinnamon. If you have a 2012-or-newer PC, I recommend you download the 64-bit version of Mint with Cinnamon and multi-media support.

If you don't have an __ISO burner program__, download one. I recommend freeware programs ImgBurn for optical drives and Yumi for Windows for USB sticks. Other good choices are LinuxLive USB Creator and UNetbootin. These are also free programs.

((( I use unetbootin. I download the iso file separately....I don't use unetbootin to download it for me. I then use the area at the bottom of the unetbootin window to locate the iso on my pc, select the USB stick to write it to....select 4gb of persistence (so that after a reboot most/all the changes i have made will still be there)....and away we go !)))


**Giving Mint a try**

Once you've installed the burner program and have the latest Linux Mint ISO file in hand, use the burner to put the ISO image to your disc or USB stick. If you're using a DVD -- __Mint is too big to fit on a CD__ -- check your newly burned disc for errors. Over the years, I've had more __problems with running Linux and installing Linux from DVDs__ from bad discs than all other causes combined.

You can set it up a USB stick with persistent storage. With this, you can store your programs and files on the stick. This way you can carry Linux and use it as a walk-around operating system for hotel, conference, and library PCs. I've found this to be very handy and there's always at least one Linux stick in my laptop bag.

**Next, you place your disc or USB stick into your PC and reboot**. During the reboot, stop the boot-up process and get to your PC's UEFI or BIOS settings. How you do this varies according to the system.

Look for a message as the machine starts up that tells which key or keys you'll need to press in order to get to the BIOS or UEFI. Likely candidates are a function key or the "esc" or "delete" keys. __If you don't spot it the first time, don't worry about it. Just reboot and try again.__


Once you get to the BIOS or UEFI, look for a menu choice labeled "Boot," "Boot Options," or "Boot Order." If you don't see anything with the word "boot" in it, check other menu options such as "Advanced Options," "Advanced BIOS Features," or "Other Options." Once you find it, set the boot order so that instead of booting from the hard drive first, you boot from either the CD/DVD drive or from a USB drive.

Once your PC is set to try to boot first from the alternative drive, insert your DVD or USB stick and reboot. __Then, select "Start Linux Mint" from the first menu. And, from there, you'll be running Linux Mint.__

Some Nvidia graphics cards don't work well with Mint's open-source driver. If Linux Mint freezes during boot, use the "nomodeset" boot option. You set this to the Start Linux Mint option and press __'e'__ to modify the boot options. Then, replace "quiet splash" with "nomodeset" and press F10 to boot. On older PCs using BIOS, press 'tab' instead of 'e.'

__MINT WILL RUN SLOWER THIS WAY, BUT IT WILL BOOT AND RUN__. If you decide to install Mint, you can permanently fix the problem with the following steps:

Run the Driver Manager
Choose the NVIDIA drivers and wait for them to be installed
Reboot the computer

SO **FAR YOU HAVEN'T INSTALLED ANYTHING ON YOUR PC, BUT YOU WILL BE RUNNING LINUX MINT. USE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO PLAY WITH IT TO SEE IF YOU LIKE IT..**

Using a DVD drive Mint will run slowly, but it will run quickly enough to give you an idea of what it's like to use Mint. With a USB stick, it runs fast enough to give you a good notion of what working with Mint is like.

P__LEASE...play with it...explore everywhere....you CANNOT break it...remember it is on a thumb drive....if it goes up in smoke, just reboot and away you go again. No harm done.__

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

The rest is for later reference....if you ultimately decide to Install Linux, you should read the rest of this tome

Advice : Have a look at **'Timeshift'** it is similar to windows system restore.....just MUCH better. It actually works.

A good tutorial can be found : https://www.linuxliteos.com/manual/tutorials.html#timeshift

While you are //playing with Linux// on a thumb drive //you will not need Timeshift//.....but after you have **actually INSTALLED Linux...then i HIGHLY recommend you give Timeshift a run**. If you have an __external hard drive as well, this is the ideal set up.__ You are able to send a 'snapshot' of your system to the external hard drive via Timeshift' ....it serves as a 'safe spot' which you can restore from with one click.
In the case of a (HIGHLY unlikely) bad update, where your normal __Linux__ would not boot.....simply boot the pc to the external hard drive...select the 'snapshot' you wish to run (usually the one made before the bad update)....click on 'restore'....go make coffee.
It will be done by the time you have made it. __Simple.__


=+==================================================================================================


==================================================================================================

Read the rest of this article online.

**PLEASE NOTE...THE MOST CRITICAL CHOICE IN ACTUALLY INSTALLING WILL BE :....HOW TO PARTITION YOUR HARD DRIVE !!!!!!.....GO ONE WAY AND LINUX WILL INSTALL ALONGSIDE YOUR WINDOWS INSTALL......GO THE OTHER WAY AND YOUR WINDOWS INSTALL WILL BE WIPED OUT. GONE. FOREVER. CHOOSE CAREFULLY !!!!!!!!**

I have always installed Linux in such a way that wipes out windows/whatever else is on the Hard drive/ssd
 

captain-sensible

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the above by condobloke is the best way of doing it. you will have a problem if you burned unetbootin to the partition you want to install linux to! in theory (never done it myself) if you set up partitions with a spare one of appropriate capacity to install to and unetbootin on a small separate one maybe could could install ? safer to do what condobloke recommends


out of interest looking back at image 3 , what do you get if you back text to get rid of "exit" and you type :

ls

eg: grub > ls
 

buffalo

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the above by condobloke is the best way of doing it. you will have a problem if you burned unetbootin to the partition you want to install linux to! in theory (never done it myself) if you set up partitions with a spare one of appropriate capacity to install to and unetbootin on a small separate one maybe could could install ? safer to do what condobloke recommends


out of interest looking back at image 3 , what do you get if you back text to get rid of "exit" and you type :

ls

eg: grub > ls
I was using a different partition to install linux and was burning unetbooin in the windows partition.

And Oops! I have already deleted the remnants of previously installed Ubuntu and hence the img 3 is now gone.

Anyway, followed the regular method through live usb and running MX rn.
✌
 
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Condobloke

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