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More packages related query.

Chrisgayle

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Few days ago I ask about packages in this forum and I learn lot of things about that from you all.
I know apt, dpkg, .deb, .rpm, repository, etc etc.
Now I encounter a new way to install any package and I didn't know anything about it, will you all spark my brain with info about it.

Today I see that some developer in GitHub give install script file instead of any .Deb file,
Example install.sh I need to download the .sh file only then run it by using bash command like bash install.sh.
Then it automatically download and install packages in my system.
My question is what is this process using bash instead of apt.
And if I download full code from that repository then can I install all packages offline.

For sample I give link of a perticular package -
To install this I need to download script:
Code:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/hestiacp/hestiacp/release/install/hst-install.sh
Then to install it:
Bash:
bash hst-install.sh

Please note I give the link of above software just as an example nothing more than that. I didn't want to install it or need it.
 


Few days ago I ask about packages in this forum and I learn lot of things about that from you all.
I know apt, dpkg, .deb, .rpm, repository, etc etc.
Now I encounter a new way to install any package and I didn't know anything about it, will you all spark my brain with info about it.

Today I see that some developer in GitHub give install script file instead of any .Deb file,
Example install.sh I need to download the .sh file only then run it by using bash command like bash install.sh.
Then it automatically download and install packages in my system.
My question is what is this process using bash instead of apt.
And if I download full code from that repository then can I install all packages offline.

For sample I give link of a perticular package -
To install this I need to download script:
Code:
wget https://raw.githubusercontent.com/hestiacp/hestiacp/release/install/hst-install.sh
Then to install it:
Bash:
bash hst-install.sh

Please note I give the link of above software just as an example nothing more than that. I didn't want to install it or need it.
For applications, programs or installable software from github, one normally clones the repository into a directory on one's system in /home/<user>/ somewhere of one's choosing rather than just downloading the install shell, e.g.:
Code:
git clone https://github.com/hestiacp/hestiacp.git
Then whilst within the directory tree where the cloned software is located, one would find the install shell and run it from there. There may be installation and user instructions on the github website from where the software came, or such info may be within the cloned directory tree in files often named README and/or INSTALL.

Programs installed this way are usually installed by default within the /usr/local directories and are not registered in the databases of the package manager on the system.
 
I know apt, dpkg, .deb, .rpm, repository, etc etc.
Please note I give the link of above software just as an example nothing more than that. I didn't want to install it or need it.
My personal opinion is that if you are new to Linux, is just to get familiar with the standard packing and package managers first. Then after that Flatpak, AppImages and Snaps. Then if you still need something or are just interested in it you can look into using scripts to install things.
 
Last edited:
Baby steps.
happy0144.gif
 
For applications, programs or installable software from github, one normally clones the repository into a directory on one's system in /home/<user>/ somewhere of one's choosing rather than just downloading the install shell, e.g.:
Code:
git clone https://github.com/hestiacp/hestiacp.git
Then whilst within the directory tree where the cloned software is located, one would find the install shell and run it from there. There may be installation and user instructions on the github website from where the software came, or such info may be within the cloned directory tree in files often named README and/or INSTALL.

Programs installed this way are usually installed by default within the /usr/local directories and are not registered in the databases of the package manager on the system.
Thanks @osprey I understand how to handle these kind of applications from GitHub.
But I don't know this "bash" and ".sh" things, I think I need to know this type of installation too in future.
 
My personal opinion is that if you are new to Linux, is just to get familiar with the standard packing and package managers first. Then after that Flatpak, AppImages and Snaps. Then if you still need something or are just interested in it you can look into using scripts to install things.
Thanks @f33dm3bits
Ok then first I need to learn default package manager and installer, which I understand lot of it by all of your's help and practice.:)
Then other package manager like Flatpack, etc. which I also started recently.
Then in future I need to understand this install script thing (.sh)
 
Unfortunately, infantilisation won't be of much assistance if the only repo for some desired software is only available on github.
Yes like the browser I use Thorium is available in github only so need to understand this GitHub download too.
(Ok thorium is also recently available in snap, but still sometimes some app only find in GitHub, like hestiacp)
 
Yes like the browser I use Thorium is available in github only so need to understand this GitHub download too.
For Thorium a Deb file or AppImage is provided. With the Deb file you just download it and install it with apt. For the AppImage, it's basically downloading the file, make it executable and then placing it in your $PATH so that you can use it.
 
For Thorium a Deb file or AppImage is provided. With the Deb file you just download it and install it with apt. For the AppImage, it's basically downloading the file, make it executable and then placing it in your $PATH so that you can use it.
Yes I know this now, I didn't know this way in past, thanks @f33dm3bits .
Yesterday night I try some .sh install scripts, and get success too, :) I understand it little bit now, just I can't find the packages detail anywhere means it doesn't show in install packages, I definitely mess it somewhere :D
 

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