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lekkerlinux

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Not quite probably more accurate to say " Ubuntu/Mint is Debian " so they share last time i looked same command :
apt-get
apt search

but the commands are nothing like that in slackware nor its approach to package management
Yes, just like you said. I have to learn some Fedora commands now because I want to try it out.

So its not sudo apt whatever or sudo eopk anymore, but sudo dnf or something.

Hope the graphical interface work most of the time. It's much easier to get information on Debian/Ubuntu commands.
 


wizardfromoz

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lekkerlinux

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i find a good comparison between the different formats is found at pacman rosetta provided by our friends at arch

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Pacman/Rosetta

wiz
Ooh, that was exactly what I was looking for, thanks Wiz! I had something like that and forgot where I put it. This time I'll put it into my Pocket, where I can find it again. The cloud one! I am so absent minded, that I won't be surprised if I woke up one day with a mini skirt on.

Just one question, if you please. Do I get root access in Fedora by typing "su" and then my password or do I use "sudo dnf" and then whatever the case might be?

I know Debian/Ubuntu use sudo apt and Solus, sodu eopkg.
 

Tolkem

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Just one question, if you please. Do I get root access in Fedora by typing "su" and then my password or do I use "sudo dnf" and then whatever the case might be?

I know Debian/Ubuntu use sudo apt and Solus, sodu eopkg.
If you want to become root, you can certainly do that by issuing "su" in a terminal in Fedora or any other distro for that matter and typing root's password when asked, not yours, not the one you use with sudo, but root's. This I believe is the common behaviour in all Linux distros. DNF is Fedora's/Red Hat's package manager. Not so long ago it used to be YUM which I really liked in CentOS but it's now deprecated and replaced by the former. Fedora does have its own set of particular commands for performing certain actions but, from the top of my head and as far as I can remember, unless things has changed, just like in debian you can
Code:
sudo dnf update
sudo dnf upgrade
sudo dnf install
sudo dnf remove
Another command is RPM which I think's something like DPKG in debian, not really sure though (something to look up later)
 

lekkerlinux

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If you want to become root, you can certainly do that by issuing "su" in a terminal in Fedora or any other distro for that matter and typing root's password when asked, not yours, not the one you use with sudo, but root's. This I believe is the common behaviour in all Linux distros. DNF is Fedora's/Red Hat's package manager. Not so long ago it used to be YUM which I really liked in CentOS but it's now deprecated and replaced by the former. Fedora does have its own set of particular commands for performing certain actions but, from the top of my head and as far as I can remember, unless things has changed, just like in debian you can
Code:
sudo dnf update
sudo dnf upgrade
sudo dnf install
sudo dnf remove
Another command is RPM which I think's something like DPKG in debian, not really sure though (something to look up later)
That is very helpfull Tolkem, thank you for the info.

I am still learning about Fedora Workstation and the install went well, the updates just takes long to install. Reminds me of Windows.

Is there a firewall in Fedora?
 

wizardfromoz

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just heading a little off-topic here, folks, we want to keep Buddha smiling :)

jot down a few questions and start a thread in Fedora if you like.

cheers

wizard
 

Tolkem

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Is there a firewall in Fedora?
Well, most LInux distros ship with iptables which
is a command line utility for configuring Linux kernel firewall implemented within the Netfilter project.
https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Iptables You could run
Code:
iptables
in a terminal, if installed you should see the help screen, otherwise "command not found". I use UFW, an acronym for Uncomplicated Firewall, which is a cli tool and has a GUI; gufw. To install it open a terminal and type
Code:
sudo dnf install ufw
or for the GUI
Code:
sudo dnf install gufw
If the cli-tool, once installed run
Code:
sudo ufw enable
and start it with
Code:
sudo ufw start
check that it's active with
Code:
sudo ufw status
Gufw should be available in Fedora's menu, look it up and start it like you do with any other regular GUI programs. Also, there's firewalld which I kind of remember it's installed by default in Fedora, at least it used to some versions ago, not sure now though https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Firewalld you could check whether or not it is in yours tipying
Code:
firewalld
in a terminal.
 

lekkerlinux

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Well, most LInux distros ship with iptables which https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Iptables You could run
Code:
iptables
in a terminal, if installed you should see the help screen, otherwise "command not found". I use UFW, an acronym for Uncomplicated Firewall, which is a cli tool and has a GUI; gufw. To install it open a terminal and type
Code:
sudo dnf install ufw
or for the GUI
Code:
sudo dnf install gufw
If the cli-tool, once installed run
Code:
sudo ufw enable
and start it with
Code:
sudo ufw start
check that it's active with
Code:
sudo ufw status
Gufw should be available in Fedora's menu, look it up and start it like you do with any other regular GUI programs. Also, there's firewalld which I kind of remember it's installed by default in Fedora, at least it used to some versions ago, not sure now though https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Firewalld you could check whether or not it is in yours tipying
Code:
firewalld
in a terminal.
Hatts of to you. Tolkem! I understand what your describing and it's very clear and helpful. I also use gufw, because it's so uncomplicated.

You are my favorite Linux learning resource! Such accessible help! (Back on topic. If there is a survey, I vote Tolkem as my favourite Linux resource!)
 

Tolkem

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Hatts of to you. Tolkem! I understand what your describing and it's very clear and helpful. I also use gufw, because it's so uncomplicated.

You are my favorite Linux learning resource! Such accessible help! (Back on topic. If there is a survey, I vote Tolkem as my favourite Linux resource!)
Thank you!! I'm just glad to help anywhere and every time I can man. :)
 

smooth_buddha

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I will put this website on here again as its such a brilliant linux resource, its simple, not too heavy a read and gives a really great overview of the system and the various parts that make up linux including netowrking. Cant recomment this website enough.

Every llinux user should make this website there home page and everytime you use the internet read a section or 2 about the system

 

smooth_buddha

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This is not a linux course but it is a full course on networking which will of course help with our linux studies!!!! Covers all the fundamentals of networking:


 

jglen490

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Last edited by a moderator:

wizardfromoz

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@jglen490 just edited the above to become a hyperlink for the viewers

good read, too, for the milk and cookies at bedtime, at 555 pages :)

wizard
 

wizardfromoz

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Vrai

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may i ask are the commands an actual part of the linux kernel, or are they classed as seperate apps/programs and simply bolted on into a package when a distro is made up???? ive been trying to learn the file system , is the /bin and/sbin where all the commands are stored??? do the commands have anything to do with the kernel????
The "commands" are actually small 'programs' or 'applications' which perform a certain function.
They are not 'part of' the kernel nor are they 'bolted on into ' a package.
They are more akin to a 'tool' which can be used to manipulate the operating system (kernel and applications).
The Linux Cookbook by Michael Stutz does a very good job of explaining this.

 


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