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how to install linux mint 19 and replace windows without usb or dvd?

Mr Mushroom

New Member
again im trying to fully install Linux and replace windows with it, but is there any way I can fully install it
safely in case it fails and I can restore it?
My Specs:
i5 m540
8gb ram
intel hd graphics
 


Bayou Bengal

Active Member
What kind of expansion ports does the computer have? Maybe a mini or Micro USB, or USB C? There are a few small laptops that have these and many owners don't realize they are USB. Also, what make is the computer and the model number?
 

Bayou Bengal

Active Member
The only way I know you can install any flavor of Linux is by using a thumb drive or a DVD. Get a 8 gig thumb drive and you should be able to install most versions.
 

poorguy

Well-Known Member

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
if I can, I suppose a cd would work too right
Has to be a DVD, download file is too large for a CD.

As I asked, elsewhere, is it Windows 7, Windows 8, or Windows 10 that you have?

Wizard
 

xXNORDXx

Member
usb drive is the way to go as a noobie it was super easy.
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
have a Slow read....then read it again

**How to install/try Linux Mint on your Windows PC**

First, you can -- __and should__ -- try Linux Mint before switching to it. Fortunately, unlike other operating systems, Linux distros like Mint make it easy to give them a test run before installing it.

First you'll need to download a copy of Linux Mint, which comes with three different desktops: MATE, Xfce, and its default desktop, Cinnamon. If you have a 2012-or-newer PC, I recommend you download the 64-bit version of Mint with Cinnamon and multi-media support.

If you don't have an __ISO burner program__, download one. I recommend freeware programs ImgBurn for optical drives and Yumi for Windows for USB sticks. Other good choices are LinuxLive USB Creator and UNetbootin. These are also free programs.

((( I use unetbootin. I download the iso file separately....I don't use unetbootin to download it for me. I then use the are at the bottom of the unetbootin window to locate the iso on my pc, select the USB stick to write it to....select 4gb of persistence (so that after a reboot most/all the changes i have made will still be there)....and away we go !)))


**Giving Mint a try**

Once you've installed the burner program and have the latest Linux Mint ISO file in hand, use the burner to put the ISO image to your disc or USB stick. If you're using a DVD -- __Mint is too big to fit on a CD__ -- check your newly burned disc for errors. Over the years, I've had more __problems with running Linux and installing Linux from DVDs__ from bad discs than all other causes combined.

You can set it up a USB stick with persistent storage. With this, you can store your programs and files on the stick. This way you can carry Linux and use it as a walk-around operating system for hotel, conference, and library PCs. I've found this to be very handy and there's always at least one Linux stick in my laptop bag.

**Next, you place your disc or USB stick into your PC and reboot**. During the reboot, stop the boot-up process and get to your PC's UEFI or BIOS settings. How you do this varies according to the system.

Look for a message as the machine starts up that tells which key or keys you'll need to press in order to get to the BIOS or UEFI. Likely candidates are a function key or the "esc" or "delete" keys. __If you don't spot it the first time, don't worry about it. Just reboot and try again.__


Once you get to the BIOS or UEFI, look for a menu choice labeled "Boot," "Boot Options," or "Boot Order." If you don't see anything with the word "boot" in it, check other menu options such as "Advanced Options," "Advanced BIOS Features," or "Other Options." Once you find it, set the boot order so that instead of booting from the hard drive first, you boot from either the CD/DVD drive or from a USB drive.

Once your PC is set to try to boot first from the alternative drive, insert your DVD or USB stick and reboot. __Then, select "Start Linux Mint" from the first menu. And, from there, you'll be running Linux Mint.__

Some Nvidia graphics cards don't work well with Mint's open-source driver. If Linux Mint freezes during boot, use the "nomodeset" boot option. You set this to the Start Linux Mint option and press __'e'__ to modify the boot options. Then, replace "quiet splash" with "nomodeset" and press F10 to boot. On older PCs using BIOS, press 'tab' instead of 'e.'

__MINT WILL RUN SLOWER THIS WAY, BUT IT WILL BOOT AND RUN__. If you decide to install Mint, you can permanently fix the problem with the following steps:

Run the Driver Manager
Choose the NVIDIA drivers and wait for them to be installed
Reboot the computer

SO **FAR YOU HAVEN'T INSTALLED ANYTHING ON YOUR PC, BUT YOU WILL BE RUNNING LINUX MINT. USE THIS OPPORTUNITY TO PLAY WITH IT TO SEE IF YOU LIKE IT..**

Using a DVD drive Mint will run slowly, but it will run quickly enough to give you an idea of what it's like to use Mint. With a USB stick, it runs fast enough to give you a good notion of what working with Mint is like.

P__LEASE...play with it...explore everywhere....you CANNOT break it...remember it is on a thumb drive....if it goes up in smoke, just reboot and away you go again. No harm done.__
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
So I take it you have Linux Mint 19 on the DVD, is that so?

Have you read Brian's (@Condobloke 's) Spoiler content above at #9 ? Just substitute DVD for USB stick and it works the same, for you to try it out.

If, after trying it out, you decide you want to install, then while the DVD session is running, double-click the Install icon on the desktop.

If you want to erase Windows, choose to erase whole disk and install MInt.

If you want to dual-boot, choose to install alongside Windows.

Cheers

Wizard
 

Mr Mushroom

New Member
So I take it you have Linux Mint 19 on the DVD, is that so?

Have you read Brian's (@Condobloke 's) Spoiler content above at #9 ? Just substitute DVD for USB stick and it works the same, for you to try it out.

If, after trying it out, you decide you want to install, then while the DVD session is running, double-click the Install icon on the desktop.

If you want to erase Windows, choose to erase whole disk and install MInt.

If you want to dual-boot, choose to install alongside Windows.

Cheers

Wizard
ok, so i pressed write to dvd, i wrote the iso image to dvd btw, but when i tried to boot from the dvd and it selected boot failed to start. anything im doing wrong?
 

Condobloke

Well-Known Member
What did you use to write the image to dvd ?

Are you using a windows computer to do this ?
 

Mr Mushroom

New Member
What did you use to write the image to dvd ?

Are you using a windows computer to do this ?
yes i am using a windows computer, the specs are above
yes i did write the image to dvd, was i supposed to format it before i wrote the linux mint iso to it?
also im using something called inferarecorder
 

Mr Mushroom

New Member
IMG_20190422_153211.jpg
okay, judging from my last thread, i was supposed to use a usb or dvd
(i have a dvd btw.)
and when i predded write image to disc, it did its thing
but when i tried to boot from it, it said selected boot failed (or something like that)
so i tried it again, still didnt work.
am i doing something wrong?
i used InfraRecorder btw.

update:
 

TechnoJunky

Active Member
Look at your DVD in Windows Explorer. What are the contents of the drive (just the top level)? The contents should basically be a folder named boot, install, isolinux, some others a file md5sum.txt a readme. Yours may be different based on the distro.
 
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