How to copy terminal text beyond screen

Halvor Raknes

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I have run an app which produces thousands of lines of screen output. How can I copy all of it so that I can paste it into a text editor (to search for stuff)?
 


I have run an app which produces thousands of lines of screen output. How can I copy all of it so that I can paste it into a text editor (to search for stuff)?
Dude, no worries! I got you covered. To copy all that gnarly output, you can pipe it to the tee command. Just use this syntax:

Code:
your_command | tee file.txt

This will copy all the output to both the screen and the file file.txt. Once you've done that, you can open file.txt with your favorite text editor and search away!

If you don't want to see the output on the screen, you can redirect it straight to the file like this:

Code:
your_command > file.txt

Remember, with great power comes great responsibility, so use your newfound text-searching abilities wisely, bro!
 
OK, but that doesn't give me access to the text that is currently in my terminal window! How can I save all of that now?
 
OK, but that doesn't give me access to the text that is currently in my terminal window! How can I save all of that now?
Whoa, my bad for not catching that, dude! If you want to save the existing text in your terminal window, you can use a nifty little keyboard shortcut. Just hit Ctrl+Shift+C to copy all the text, and then you can paste it into your text editor of choice.

If that shortcut doesn't work, you can try right-clicking on the terminal window and selecting "Copy" or "Copy All." This should grab all the text, and then you can paste it into your text editor.

Now you'll have a copy of all that groovy terminal output, ready to be searched and analyzed to your heart's content!
 
That doesn't work! The problem is marking all the text that is beyond the screen.
My bad, bro! Sorry for the confusion.

To copy all the text in your terminal, including the parts that are beyond the visible screen, you can use the script command.

Just follow these steps, dude:

1. Open a terminal window.
2. Run the command script without any arguments.
3. This will start a new shell session within the script and all the output will be logged.
4. Perform the actions or run the app that produces the lengthy output you want to copy.
5. Once you're done, type exit to end the script session.

After quitting the script session, you'll find a file called typescript in your current directory. This file contains the entire terminal session, including all the output that was beyond the visible screen.

Now you can open the typescript file with your favorite text editor, and you'll have access to all that text, ready to be searched or copied wherever you want. Stay groovy, mate!
 
Hey! I am talking about text that EXISTS CURRENTLY in a terminal window! Not stuff to be done in the future!
 
Hey! I am talking about text that EXISTS CURRENTLY in a terminal window! Not stuff to be done in the future!
Apologies for the misunderstanding, dude! My bad.

To copy the text that currently exists in a terminal window, follow these steps:

1. First, select the text you want to copy by clicking and dragging your cursor over it.
2. Once the text is selected, right-click on it and choose "Copy" from the context menu.
3. Now you can paste the copied text into your text editor or any other application you want.

If you're using a terminal emulator that doesn't support right-clicking, you can try the following alternative:

1. Click and drag your cursor to select the desired text.
2. With the text selected, press Ctrl+Shift+C to copy it.
3. Now you can paste the copied text wherever you want.

Apologies again for the confusion, bro! I hope this helps you get the text you're looking for.
 
And what about the THOUSANDS of lines that are beyond the terminal window?

Please read my consecutive posts in the context of what I have already presented!
 
And what about the THOUSANDS of lines that are beyond the terminal window?

Please read my consecutive posts in the context of what I have already presented!
Yo dude, my bad for not fully understanding your question. I apologize for that.

To copy thousands of lines beyond the visible terminal window, you can use the scrollback feature of your terminal emulator. Here's how to do it in a few popular terminal emulators:

1. GNOME Terminal: Press and hold the Shift key and use the scroll wheel on your mouse to scroll up and select the desired text. Once selected, you can copy it using the right-click menu or by pressing Ctrl+Shift+C.

2. Konsole: Press and hold the Shift key and use the scroll wheel on your mouse to scroll up and select the text you want. After selecting, you can copy it using the right-click menu or by pressing Ctrl+Shift+C.

3. Terminator: Press and hold the Shift key and use the scroll wheel on your mouse to scroll up and select the text. Once selected, you can copy it using the right-click menu or by pressing Ctrl+Shift+C.

These are just a few examples, but most terminal emulators have similar functionality. Give it a shot, dude, and you should be able to copy all those lines beyond the visible window. Keep on rockin'!
 
I can't HOLD THE SCROLL WHEEL (or which is worse in my case, pushing down on the touchpad) for 20 minutes!
 
I can't HOLD THE SCROLL WHEEL (or which is worse in my case, pushing down on the touchpad) for 20 minutes!
Apologies once again, dude. I misunderstood your situation.

If manually scrolling through thousands of lines isn't feasible, I've got another hack for you:

1. Run the command that produced the lengthy output again, but this time, pipe it to the less command. For example:
Code:
your_command | less

2. This will open the output in the less pager, allowing you to navigate through the text using the arrow keys.

3. While in less, press G to jump to the end of the output. This way, you'll be able to see and access all the text that exists beyond the terminal window.

4. To copy the text, press v to enter "visual" mode. Now you can use the arrow keys to navigate and select the desired text.

5. Once you've selected the text, press y to copy it.

This approach should allow you to copy the complete text, including the parts that are beyond the visible terminal window. Give it a shot, and I hope it works out for you, bro!
 
OK, so my problem cannot be solved! THIS SUX!
Hey, I'm sorry if I wasn't able to provide a solution that meets your needs, dude. I totally understand your frustration. Sometimes, the limitations of certain tools or setups can be a bummer.

If you're dealing with a situation where the text you want to copy is simply too massive to handle manually, there's another alternative you could consider:

You can redirect the output of your command to a file, and then access and manipulate that file as needed. Here's how you can do it:

1. Run your command and redirect the output to a file using the greater-than sign >. For example:
Code:
your_command > output.txt

2. This will save the output of your command to a file named "output.txt" in your current directory.

3. You can then access the file using a text editor of your choice, search for specific content, and manipulate it as needed.

Although it might not be as convenient as directly copying from the terminal window, this approach should give you access to all the output in a more manageable way.

I hope this suggestion helps, dude! If you have any other questions or need further assistance, feel free to ask.
 
Thanks anyway…
You're welcome, dude! I apologize for not being able to provide the exact solution you were looking for. If you have any other questions or need assistance with anything else, feel free to ask. I'm here to help in any way I can. Keep rockin' and stay positive!
 
Is this really a problem that somebody in the Linux development community hasn't identified as an ACTUAL issue that ought to be remedied?

I do realize this is a problem for newbies only, but it's a real issue that can have serious ramifications if it cannot be solved in a precipitous crisis.

I'd like to hear from some serious OS developers why they cannot be bothered (or simply, for some peculiar technical systemic reason, cannot) to produce a fix here!
 
Is this really a problem that somebody in the Linux development community hasn't identified as an ACTUAL issue that ought to be remedied?

I do realize this is a problem for newbies only, but it's a real issue that can have serious ramifications if it cannot be solved in a precipitous crisis.

I'd like to hear from some serious OS developers why they cannot be bothered (or simply, for some peculiar technical systemic reason, cannot) to fix!
I hear you, dude. It's understandable that you'd expect the Linux development community to address such issues. Let me shed some light on this.

The Linux development community consists of a diverse group of individuals who contribute to different aspects of the operating system. While they do their best to address various user needs and improve the overall system, some issues may not receive immediate attention due to a variety of reasons.

Regarding terminal scrolling and text selection, it's worth noting that terminal emulators are separate software applications from the Linux kernel itself. Terminal emulator developers are responsible for implementing features like scrollback, copy functionality, and user interface design. There are numerous terminal emulators available for Linux, each with its own set of features and limitations.

The challenge lies in balancing the needs of different user groups within the Linux community. Terminal emulators aim to cater to a wide range of users, from newcomers to advanced users. While usability improvements are generally considered, not every specific use case can be immediately addressed.

That being said, the Linux community is open and receptive to feedback. If you believe that this issue significantly impacts user experience and should be prioritized, you can consider reaching out to the specific terminal emulator developers or contributing to the open-source project yourself. Collaborative efforts and community involvement often drive improvements in the Linux ecosystem.

So, while it may seem like a small issue to some, it's valuable to voice your concerns and contribute to the ongoing development and refinement of the Linux ecosystem. Unity and collaboration can lead to positive changes, my friend!
 
I would suggest this is a core issue related to all terminal emulators, basic on the level of being able to copy text or scroll. That's why I find it a little hard to understand why the absence of this functionality which I request has been left to be ignored for the decades that have passed since the first terminal emulators EVER were written.
 
I would suggest this is a core issue related to all terminal emulators, basic on the level of being able to copy text or scroll. That's why I find it a little hard to understand why the absence of this functionality which I request has been left to be ignored for the decades that have passed since the first terminal emulators EVER were written.
You make a valid point, dude. Basic functionalities like text selection and scrolling are indeed fundamental requirements for terminal emulators. It's understandable that the absence of such functionalities can be frustrating, especially when dealing with large amounts of output.

Terminal emulators have evolved over time, and many have implemented these features to enhance user experience. However, the specific issue you mentioned, where scrolling beyond the visible window while maintaining selection, may not be universally prioritized or implemented in all terminal emulators.

The history of software development is complex, and sometimes certain functionalities or improvements can take longer to address due to various factors, such as resource limitations, competing priorities, or differing design philosophies. It's also worth noting that the Linux ecosystem is vast, with different terminal emulators developed independently by different teams, which may lead to variations in functionality.

While it may seem surprising that this particular issue has persisted, it's important to remember that open-source development depends on voluntary contributions and community involvement. If a certain feature or improvement is deemed essential or in high demand, it often requires individuals or teams to step up and champion its development.

If this issue is causing significant challenges for you, it might be worth exploring different terminal emulators that offer advanced features or considering alternative approaches like redirecting output to files or utilizing other tools specifically designed for large-scale text processing.

In any case, I understand your frustration, and I hope that future advancements will address this concern. It's always a good idea to engage with the open-source community, share feedback, or even contribute directly if you have the skills and resources to do so. Together, we can shape the future of Linux and its related tools. Hang in there, my friend!
 

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