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Foreign language text

Discussion in 'General Linux' started by Larryrl, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Larryrl

    Larryrl New Member

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    I have an alternate alphabet font that I use as a replacement for the Latin alphabet. I use it to keep a pen and paper journal in English, so my family is not able to read my private thoughts. I also keep one on windows and have started migrating it to linux by installing my font on some of my virtual machine distros. Now some people call the letters glyphs. In the old chineese kung fu movies you would always see people writing on wood or paper with a paint and a brush making those beautiful characters. That is the way I want the data written to the hard drive, so that the file can only be viewed in my alphabet and no other.


     
  2. wizardfromoz

    wizardfromoz Well-Known Member

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    OK, that is called calligraphy, typically used by the Chinese, Japanese, and Koreans, &c.

    Is this in any way related to

    in your other thread?

    It is an intriguing question. There are likely others here whom know more about such things than I.

    I'll keep my eyes open, and report back if I find something. Don't hold your breath waiting, and take the first help that comes along. I am 5,000 years old, and can take an aeon to get some jobs done :confused:

    Cheers

    Wiz
     
    Rob and CptCharis like this.
  3. atanere

    atanere Moderator
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    Not quite, oh wise Wizard! :D Calligraphy is a "visual art related to writing," according to Wikipedia, usually performed with a broad tip pen or a brush. Calligraphy is not exclusive to Asian characters, but is often used in English (and probably just about any language) for special artistic applications. Wedding invitations commonly use calligraphy, for example.

    Chinese characters are not an alphabet... Wikipedia calls them "logograms." In China they are called Hanzi. Japan and Korea both have borrowed the characters for their own use. Japan calls them Kanji, and Korea calls them Hanja. Japan also uses a phonetic script based on simplified Kanji, but Korea developed their own true alphabet, called Hangul. I was once a student of the Korean language so I'm more familiar with it than with Japanese or Chinese.

    건배 (Cheers)
     
    wizardfromoz likes this.
  4. atanere

    atanere Moderator
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    Hi Larry! I'm not quite sure what you mean here. If you have a computer font that is used in Windows and Linux, and you use that font to create a diary or journal (or any document)... then saving the file should store your document in that font. If the file is moved to another computer that doesn't have your special font, then I'm unsure what the result would be when opening the file.... but it will have to choose some font that is built into that system (and it may map back to English if it doesn't know what to do). I don't think there is a way to "lock" your glyph alphabet into the file if you type the file with a computer. Or if there is a way that seems to do that, then I don't think I would really trust it... computers are just too good at translating things when asked.

    You could create your documents in your glyph alphabet on paper... then scan them for computer storage. That achieves your goal, as I understand it. But I don't think that is what you want to do here.

    If you want to preserve your privacy, I think you should use encryption on your documents instead. And if you want to preserve your documents, you should also keep backups to external media, like flash drives, external hard drives, or DVD's. To me, encryption is a somewhat fragile thing... a small hiccup on your computer (especially when the file is open)... and you may damage the file so that it would no longer be usable. I say this because I lost an encrypted password database awhile back, and I was not happy to rebuild all the data manually after the corruption. Backups are essential for anything important to you

    Cheers
     
    wizardfromoz likes this.
  5. Larryrl

    Larryrl New Member

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    OK,:) I keep a paper journal using the language characters I chose, but I also used an internet site to create a font of those characters, and installed it into my windows 10 and my Linux vm's. Now I can use my special revenline journal program I wrote to keep it on the computer as well. If the computer could write the data to the hard drive in the font I made, there woud be no need for my current encryption method I employ. It's not like I'll die if it isn't done the way I want it but It looks like from the time computers took up whole rooms untill basic was invented in Dartmouth college in the 60's to now, it at least should be possible.

    Oh and before I forget I love the Homer simpson vibe.
     
    #5 Larryrl, Jun 16, 2018
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2018
    wizardfromoz likes this.
  6. ryanvade

    ryanvade Moderator
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    Are you using the correct encoding for writing to the file? You should be able to write any human language character set to file if it is encoded in unicode.

    Quick Python3 Example:
    Code:
    foo = u'Δ, Й, ק, ‎ م, ๗, あ, 叶, 葉, and 말.'
    f = open('test.txt', 'w')
    f.write(foo)
    f.close()
     
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