Automation

spanish

New Member
Hi,
I’m new to Linux and don’t know where to take off.
My primary purpose is to learn the automation tools and then go into linux security.
Which of the linux distributions do I need to install and where can I get the software?
Please note that presently, I have windows 10 laptop and would prefer VM for linux software.
Thanks for your anticipated assistance.
 


TechnoJunky

Well-Known Member
You can use any Linux distro to do anything in Linux. They're all good, all have pretty much the same stuff available. I would suggest though, if you're getting into Linux to work at an enterprise doing some sort of support on Linux that you use a RedHat variant. Fedora and CentOS are probably the best there. I believe most enterprise companies use RedHat due to their great enterprise support. RedHat Linux isn't freely available outside of Cent OS and Fedora. Check out this site for differences between them.
 

JulienCC

Active Member
Hello,

I’m new to Linux and don’t know where to take off.
My primary purpose is to learn the automation tools and then go into linux security.
Good luck and welcome !
There are different kind of security. When it comes to technical field security comes by knowing as much as possible on the systems involved.

If you wan't to be in linux security to brag about being a hacker well you have two options : being a script kiddie and use programs made by other without really understanding what you are doing, or really get yourself into the computer world.

I know this is not a "millenial" approach but you should get your hands on good books. Go to a library or buy used ones if you want to save money. Books will have a structured approach that will teach you a lot a concepts and words, this way you can start by one concept your heard about and the book will give you other hints about what you can learn.
The reference editor for computer books is O'Reilly, you basically can't be wrong if you take a book from them.
The "dummies" collection is not bad for a first start. Things are explained properly without too many shortcuts. However they will only cover some basic parts of the matter.

Exemple of book : http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596154493.do

Relying solely on websites and articles will only give you a hint about what's going one. Most topics are way too complex to be covered in less than 300 pages, so if you think that you got it all in a 20 lines/4 pictures tutorial you are wrong.

Online courses can also be really nice but since it's way cheaper to build an online courses platform than printing a book there's a lot of poor quality courses out there.

Ofcourse this is all about theorical knowledge. You must get your hands dirty if you want some real world skills. Install a Linux distro but don't go the VM way. Linux is a lot about hardware and VM will make some things very blurry to you. Get your hands on an old machine. You can find cheap used desktops from offices quite easilly nowadays.

Like TechnoJunky said if you want to go pro about it you should go for a redhat based distro. I would suggest Fedora since it has a wider community arround.
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/10/html-single/Installation_Guide/index.html jump to chapter 3 for installation procedure

To sum it up : install a linux distro and avoid VM as possible. Then get your hands on good learning material.
 

spanish

New Member
You can use any Linux distro to do anything in Linux. They're all good, all have pretty much the same stuff available. I would suggest though, if you're getting into Linux to work at an enterprise doing some sort of support on Linux that you use a RedHat variant. Fedora and CentOS are probably the best there. I believe most enterprise companies use RedHat due to their great enterprise support. RedHat Linux isn't freely available outside of Cent OS and Fedora. Check out this site for differences between them.
You can use any Linux distro to do anything in Linux. They're all good, all have pretty much the same stuff available. I would suggest though, if you're getting into Linux to work at an enterprise doing some sort of support on Linux that you use a RedHat variant. Fedora and CentOS are probably the best there. I believe most enterprise companies use RedHat due to their great enterprise support. RedHat Linux isn't freely available outside of Cent OS and Fedora. Check out this site for differences between them.
Technojunky,
Many thanks for your response
 

spanish

New Member
Hello,



Good luck and welcome !
There are different kind of security. When it comes to technical field security comes by knowing as much as possible on the systems involved.

If you wan't to be in linux security to brag about being a hacker well you have two options : being a script kiddie and use programs made by other without really understanding what you are doing, or really get yourself into the computer world.

I know this is not a "millenial" approach but you should get your hands on good books. Go to a library or buy used ones if you want to save money. Books will have a structured approach that will teach you a lot a concepts and words, this way you can start by one concept your heard about and the book will give you other hints about what you can learn.
The reference editor for computer books is O'Reilly, you basically can't be wrong if you take a book from them.
The "dummies" collection is not bad for a first start. Things are explained properly without too many shortcuts. However they will only cover some basic parts of the matter.

Exemple of book : http://shop.oreilly.com/product/9780596154493.do

Relying solely on websites and articles will only give you a hint about what's going one. Most topics are way too complex to be covered in less than 300 pages, so if you think that you got it all in a 20 lines/4 pictures tutorial you are wrong.

Online courses can also be really nice but since it's way cheaper to build an online courses platform than printing a book there's a lot of poor quality courses out there.

Ofcourse this is all about theorical knowledge. You must get your hands dirty if you want some real world skills. Install a Linux distro but don't go the VM way. Linux is a lot about hardware and VM will make some things very blurry to you. Get your hands on an old machine. You can find cheap used desktops from offices quite easilly nowadays.

Like TechnoJunky said if you want to go pro about it you should go for a redhat based distro. I would suggest Fedora since it has a wider community arround.
https://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/10/html-single/Installation_Guide/index.html jump to chapter 3 for installation procedure

To sum it up : install a linux distro and avoid VM as possible. Then get your hands on good learning material.
JulienCC,
Really appreciate your feedback.
 


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