“Root file system not defined” in ubuntu

timurs022

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Hello. Today I was trying to get a ubuntu dist on my computer, I specified the root file system, but after that it still said “root file system not defined. Please correct this” even though I did. Could anyone help?
 


*Just going to add that as soon as I open the part where you define it, it’s not defined and I tried redoing it like 10 times.
 
Just checking. You will need a file system mounted as "/" and set to be formatted to a file system of your preferences (I prefer xfs but Ubuntu, in the default install, use Ext4). This is then your "root file system"
 
Just checking. You will need a file system mounted as "/" and set to be formatted to a file system of your preferences (I prefer xfs but Ubuntu, in the default install, use Ext4). This is then your "root file system"
I already did, the mount point keeps resetting itself that is the problem.
 
Make sure you have at least three partitions on the target disk, in this particular order: ESP, "root" and "swap".

EFI system partition = at least 512MiB, with mount point /boot/efi. This should be near the beginning of the disk. Some installers leave a 1MiB to 2MiB blank in front for some reason, and if not they give up easily trying to install the bootloader. This is maddening, like generally dealing with GRUB.
"swap" = with mount point swap and file system "linuxswap". Well this is subjective, some people say it should be at least the amount of your RAM or twice as much, but if you have 64GiB or less on disk and at least 4GB RAM then it's not practical, is it? So put down 4GiB or so because in many Calamares installer examples, in "auto" mode then about 3GiB is chosen. If you need to compile really big projects and your CPU is four cores or less you might want to put down more memory for this partition.
"root" = what is in between, with mount point "forward slash" and "ext4" file system. You could venture choosing "btrfs" if you know what you're doing and are interested in a backup solution such as Snapper or Timeshift.

Ubiquity is a bit buggy and very slow. You might want to start over again. Turn off computer, wait a moment then turn on and try again. Make sure the target disk could be written to. There are a couple of lemons out there and manufacturers like to play "ebil" on rare occasions.
 

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