World's Most Secure Web Browser

G

guardian785

Guest
Does a Linux web browser exist that will allow you to browse the web completely anonymous, and will change your ip address automatically at periodic intervals that is for sale? I found one online for Windows but can't find one for Linux. It seems to me like it would make more sense to have a secure web browser making your computer more centralized rather than going through a proxy server.
 


K

Kerms

Guest
Changing your IP cannot really be done by the browser itself, and the only ways I know how to do this is via contact with the ISP, or a router reset if you know that you get your IP from a pool of IPs.

This means, the browser is using some type of dynamic proxying layer--something like The Onion Router. As they advertise it to be, don't rely on it for pure anonymity. (However, it did thwart the FBI trying to take down a child porn site, so I say it's good enough.) I recommend downloading the TOR browser bundle, which is Firefox accompanied with the TOR router.

There are a couple addons that work with the browser bundle, that provide extra security:
Ghostery--an anti-tracker/anti-cookie addon, and Ad Block Plus (And it's accompanying addons) with the filters `EasyList', `Fanboy's Adblock List', and `EasyPrivacy', along with other lists that fit in with the languages of the sites you're visiting.

Lastly, if you really are the Paranoid Parrot, I recommend getting a VPN and look into I2P.

I also recommend getting into computer security to get a better understanding of privacy, therefore boosting it.
 
G

guardian785

Guest
Excellent information thanks! You've been a great help. I really appreciate the expertise.
 
M

mcneely.mike

Guest
Does the tor browser bundle increase your bandwidth much? I heard tor will do that.....
 
K

Kerms

Guest
No, it does not. In fact it does the opposite.

Doing relative measurements, I have found that TOR eats around 20 KiB/s of your upload for just pure encryption layers (even if you do something insanely small like 1 KiB/s).

This is because TOR jumps around several nodes before it exits the `Onion Cloud', and each node has it's own layer of encryption; an encrypted layer, within an encrypted layer, within an encrypted layer...

If you have a connection that can handle that spare 20 kilobytes, just hope you don't have a node that's in the United States, and if it is, hope it's a university or a group with a lot of money (because the USA offers crappy internet speeds for a lot of money and no vice versa).
 


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