• Important: We recently upgraded our forum software - please let us know if you run into any issues.

windows 10 boot issue

K_ogren

New Member
I installed Linux mint to my sdb drive using something else option. I believe my windows install on sda was affected because of the hibernation issue created by fast-boot. I now can't boot into windows. Linux won't mount the drive, and a windows 10 recovery disk doesn't see the windows install. I have created an image of the sda disk using boot-repair and placed it in a third drive sdc. I cant mount the ISO image to verify its contents. I am hoping to repair the boot information in order to boot into windows again. Any help would be appreciated.

BTW is it normal not to be able to paste into this text box?
 
Last edited:


K_ogren

New Member
Does this output strike any thoughts;

[email protected]:~$ sudo gdisk -l /dev/sda
[sudo] password for ken:
GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 1.0.3

Partition table scan:
MBR: MBR only
BSD: not present
APM: not present
GPT: not present


***************************************************************
Found invalid GPT and valid MBR; converting MBR to GPT format
in memory.
***************************************************************

Disk /dev/sda: 500118192 sectors, 238.5 GiB
Model: M4-CT256M4SSD2
Sector size (logical/physical): 512/512 bytes
Disk identifier (GUID): 900C90DD-A709-4D82-8F1A-9271C671C274
Partition table holds up to 128 entries
Main partition table begins at sector 2 and ends at sector 33
First usable sector is 34, last usable sector is 500118158
Partitions will be aligned on 2048-sector boundaries
Total free space is 500118125 sectors (238.5 GiB)

Number Start (sector) End (sector) Size Code Name
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
G'day Ken and welcome to linux.org, albeit under trying circumstances :(:)

Did you get on the wrong side of Santa or something (naughty or nice)?

What a curly one.

My assumptions here (if wrong, enlighten me) are that you have your "Mintie" working on /dev/sdb, which is perhaps a SATA HDD, the Crucial SSD 256GB /dev/sda is where Win 10 lives, and you have internet access from Mint.

How am I doing?

From Terminal, can you post to us the output of

Code:
inxi -Fxz
... that will give us some output to get rolling.

On your reply pane toolbar 4th from right is an icon of a plus sign in an oblong "square". It has Quote, Spoiler, Code and Strike-Through.

If you copy and paste the output in between the code fields, we can read it more easily. Just as you did above, including user prompt and command, because then we can check for syntax errors with commands as well.

The "z" option in inxi -Fxz filters out your MAC addresses for Ethernet and Wifi, for privacy so use that here.

Mine looks like this

Code:
chr[email protected]:~$ inxi -Fxz
System:    Host: Tara-Cinnamon-SSD Kernel: 4.15.0-42-generic x86_64
           bits: 64 gcc: 7.3.0
           Desktop: Cinnamon 3.8.9 (Gtk 3.22.30-1ubuntu1)
           Distro: Linux Mint 19 Tara
Machine:   Device: laptop System: Dell product: Inspiron 5770 serial: N/A
           Mobo: Dell model: 0XH3XD v: A00 serial: N/A
           UEFI: Dell v: 1.1.8 date: 08/15/2018
Battery    BAT0: charge: 39.9 Wh 100.0% condition: 39.9/42.0 Wh (95%)
           model: SMP DELL Y3F7Y6B status: Full
CPU:       Quad core Intel Core i7-8550U (-MT-MCP-)
           arch: Kaby Lake rev.10 cache: 8192 KB
           flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 15936
           clock speeds: max: 4000 MHz 1: 800 MHz 2: 792 MHz 3: 800 MHz
           4: 800 MHz 5: 800 MHz 6: 799 MHz 7: 800 MHz 8: 800 MHz
Graphics:  Card-1: Intel UHD Graphics 620 bus-ID: 00:02.0
           Card-2: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Topaz XT [Radeon R7 M260/M265 / M340/M360 / M440/M445]
           bus-ID: 01:00.0
           Display Server: x11 (X.Org 1.19.6 )
           drivers: modesetting,ati,amdgpu (unloaded: fbdev,vesa)
           Resolution: [email protected]
           OpenGL: renderer: Mesa DRI Intel UHD Graphics 620 (Kabylake GT2)
           version: 4.5 Mesa 18.0.5 Direct Render: Yes
Audio:     Card Intel Sunrise Point-LP HD Audio
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1f.3
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.15.0-42-generic
Network:   Card-1: Realtek RTL8101/2/6E PCIE Fast/Gigabit Ethernet controller
           driver: r8169 v: 2.3LK-NAPI port: d000 bus-ID: 02:00.0
           IF: enp2s0 state: down mac: <filter>
           Card-2: Qualcomm Atheros QCA9377 802.11ac Wireless Network Adapter
           driver: ath10k_pci bus-ID: 03:00.0
           IF: wlp3s0 state: up mac: <filter>
           Card-3: Atheros usb-ID: 001-008
           IF: null-if-id state: N/A speed: N/A duplex: N/A mac: N/A
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 6288.5GB (13.8% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: ST2000LM007 size: 2000.4GB
           ID-2: /dev/sdb model: Micron_1100_SATA size: 256.1GB
           ID-3: USB /dev/sdc model: My_Book_25EE size: 4000.8GB
           ID-4: USB /dev/sdd model: Cruzer_Glide size: 15.7GB
           ID-5: USB /dev/sde model: Cruzer_Glide size: 15.6GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 20G used: 15G (76%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sdb10
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 54.0C mobo: N/A gpu: 55.0
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 325 Uptime: 1 day Memory: 2039.5/15938.0MB
           Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 7.3.0
           Client: Shell (bash 4.4.191) inxi: 2.3.56
Anything that will plug in, plug it in.

If you want to keep a record for yourself, use inxi -Fxs , the "s" will reveal your MAC addresses and you can save it as a text file.

Cheers

Chris Turner
wizardfromoz
 

K_ogren

New Member
G'day Chris

It does appear to be a bit of a curly one, I didn't think I had behaved poorly, but it looks like Santa sees it differently.

You are doing well. I have a "Mintie" working on /dev/sdb, which is an SSD SATA HDD, the Crucial SSD 256GB /dev/sda is where Win 10 lives, and I have internet access from Mint. There is a third drive which is a 2 TB mechanical drive where I have made a couple of attempts to save the data from the Crucial using photorec, and I have created an ISO of the crucial.

Code:
System:    Host: ken-desktop Kernel: 4.15.0-43-generic x86_64
           bits: 64 gcc: 7.3.0
           Desktop: Cinnamon 3.8.9 (Gtk 3.22.30-1ubuntu1)
           Distro: Linux Mint 19 Tara
Machine:   Device: desktop Mobo: ASRock model: Z87 Killer serial: N/A
           BIOS: American Megatrends v: P1.10 date: 11/11/2013
CPU:       Quad core Intel Core i5-4670K (-MCP-)
           arch: Haswell rev.3 cache: 6144 KB
           flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 ssse3 vmx) bmips: 27191
           clock speeds: max: 3800 MHz 1: 2650 MHz 2: 2040 MHz 3: 1895 MHz
           4: 1894 MHz
Graphics:  Card: NVIDIA GK104 [GeForce GTX 760] bus-ID: 01:00.0
           Display Server: x11 (X.Org 1.19.6 )
           drivers: nouveau (unloaded: modesetting,fbdev,vesa)
           Resolution: [email protected]
           OpenGL: renderer: NVE4 version: 4.3 Mesa 18.0.5 Direct Render: Yes
Audio:     Card-1 Intel 8 Series/C220 Series High Def. Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:1b.0
           Card-2 NVIDIA GK104 HDMI Audio Controller
           driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1
           Card-3 Logitech HD Webcam C525 driver: USB Audio usb-ID: 003-002
           Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture v: k4.15.0-43-generic
Network:   Card: Qualcomm Atheros Killer E220x Gigabit Ethernet Controller
           driver: alx port: d000 bus-ID: 03:00.0
           IF: enp3s0 state: up speed: 100 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>
Drives:    HDD Total Size: 2868.1GB (1.5% used)
           ID-1: /dev/sda model: KINGSTON_SVP100S size: 96.0GB
           ID-2: /dev/sdb model: M4 size: 256.1GB
           ID-3: /dev/sdc model: ST2000DM001 size: 2000.4GB
           ID-4: USB /dev/sdi model: USB_2.0_FD size: 15.5GB
           ID-5: USB /dev/sdh model: External_USB_3.0 size: 500.1GB
Partition: ID-1: / size: 88G used: 39G (47%) fs: ext4 dev: /dev/sda1
RAID:      No RAID devices: /proc/mdstat, md_mod kernel module present
Sensors:   System Temperatures: cpu: 34.0C mobo: N/A
           Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A
Info:      Processes: 204 Uptime: 5 min Memory: 1250.0/7908.0MB
           Init: systemd runlevel: 5 Gcc sys: 7.3.0
           Client: Shell (bash 4.4.191) inxi: 2.3.56
Thanks so much for your time and help, I hope Santa had a better opinion of your year. :)
 
Last edited:

K_ogren

New Member
I used testdisk to write the partition table, then used the windows recovery drive to access the command prompt to run bootrec /fixmbr bootrec /scanos bootrec /rebuildbcd. Now I just need to figure the booting back into Linux. :)
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
That's great, Mate :). 3 things before you go -

1. Enable your firewall. Ctrl-Alt-t is a shortcut to open Terminal. Type in, then enter

Code:
sudo ufw enable
It will ask for your password, type it in and enter (there is no movement, security). It will reward you with a message that your firewall is enabled in real time and will also be switched on each time you boot/reboot.

2. Make the acquaintance of Tony George's Timeshift, it is installed already on your Mintie. By default it will set up a hidden folder called .timeshift (note the dot, hides it) in your /home/yourusername folder or partition. It is like Windows Restore but way better. Better, with all the space you have, would be to dedicate a partition on one of the externals. You've used 39GB, so you might make it 60 - 80 - 100GB your choice, it can always be grown later.

3. To make the partition, you can use the GNOME Partition Editor, aka GParted. They had it on your install disk, which you could use for the purpose, but I think Mint still removes it on the way out, but it is in your Repositories.

Code:
sudo apt install gparted
Top right side of GParted screen allows you to go through the drives, you would identify the drive you want to use for GParted, then Create New and set the size, tell it to use EXT4 for Linux, and label it, say, Timeshift?

See my Tute on Timeshift here, and ask any questions at the Tute thread.

4. If that F11 method begins to annoy you, we can work with you to get a menu called Grub Menu that will appear at bootup, it will feature Linux Mint on top followed by Advanced Options and then Windows Boot Manager, which is the entry point for Windows. Before we would monkey with that, you would perform a Timeshift snapshot, so that if things headed south for the winter, you could roll back with confidence.

OK that was 4, I lied.

Cheers, enjoy your Linux and

Avagudweegend

Wizard
 
That's great, Mate :). 3 things before you go -

1. Enable your firewall. Ctrl-Alt-t is a shortcut to open Terminal. Type in, then enter

Code:
sudo ufw enable
It will ask for your password, type it in and enter (there is no movement, security). It will reward you with a message that your firewall is enabled in real time and will also be switched on each time you boot/reboot.

2. Make the acquaintance of Tony George's Timeshift, it is installed already on your Mintie. By default it will set up a hidden folder called .timeshift (note the dot, hides it) in your /home/yourusername folder or partition. It is like Windows Restore but way better. Better, with all the space you have, would be to dedicate a partition on one of the externals. You've used 39GB, so you might make it 60 - 80 - 100GB your choice, it can always be grown later.

3. To make the partition, you can use the GNOME Partition Editor, aka GParted. They had it on your install disk, which you could use for the purpose, but I think Mint still removes it on the way out, but it is in your Repositories.

Code:
sudo apt install gparted
Top right side of GParted screen allows you to go through the drives, you would identify the drive you want to use for GParted, then Create New and set the size, tell it to use EXT4 for Linux, and later
That's great, Mate :). 3 things before you go -

1. Enable your firewall. Ctrl-Alt-t is a shortcut to open Terminal. Type in, then enter

Code:
sudo ufw enable
It will ask for your password, type it in and enter (there is no movement, security). It will reward you with a message that your firewall is enabled in real time and will also be switched on each time you boot/reboot.

2. Make the acquaintance of Tony George's Timeshift, it is installed already on your Mintie. By default it will set up a hidden folder called .timeshift (note the dot, hides it) in your /home/yourusername folder or partition. It is like Windows Restore but way better. Better, with all the space you have, would be to dedicate a partition on one of the externals. You've used 39GB, so you might make it 60 - 80 - 100GB your choice, it can always be grown later.

3. To make the partition, you can use the GNOME Partition Editor, aka GParted. They had it on your install disk, which you could use for the purpose, but I think Mint still removes it on the way out, but it is in your Repositories.

Code:
sudo apt install gparted
Top right side of GParted screen allows you to go through the drives, you would identify the drive you want to use for GParted, then Create New and set the size, tell it to use EXT4 for Linux, and label it, say, Timeshift?

See my Tute on Timeshift here, and ask any questions at the Tute thread.

4. If that F11 method begins to annoy you, we can work with you to get a menu called Grub Menu that will appear at bootup, it will feature Linux Mint on top followed by Advanced Options and then Windows Boot Manager, which is the entry point for Windows. Before we would monkey with that, you would perform a Timeshift snapshot, so that if things headed south for the winter, you could roll back with confidence.

OK that was 4, I lied.

Cheers, enjoy your Linux and

Avagudweegend

Wizard
Wizard,
Awesome work. Happy New Year. I did my snapshot and my firewall is enabled. I just would like to work on annoying F11 and also being able to boot without a usb stick. Also is there a way to expand my storage space for linux inside linux terminal?
 

wizardfromoz

Super Moderator
Staff member
Gold Supporter
Wizard,
Awesome work. Happy New Year. I did my snapshot and my firewall is enabled. I just would like to work on annoying F11 and also being able to boot without a usb stick. Also is there a way to expand my storage space for linux inside linux terminal?
Is that you, Chris? Do you suffer the same problem with F11 having to be used to choose which OS to boot, and you've lost me on the usb stick.

You might want to start a new Thread and we'll swing along and see what we can do?

Happy New Year to all.

Wiz
 



Top